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Economic evaluation developing countries

Suresh Subramanian, Usha Pandey, Pradip Chaudhari, Monica Tyagi, Sanjay Gupta, Geetanjali Singh, Ashutosh Dash, Grace Samuel, Meera Venkatesh
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Yttrium-90 ( 90 Y)-based radioembolization has been employed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as commercial radioactive glass and polymeric resin microspheres. However, in India and other Asian countries, these preparations must be imported and are expensive, validating the need for development of indigenous alternatives. This work was aimed to develop an economically and logistically favourable indigenous alternative to imported radioembolizing agents for HCC therapy...
May 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Research
Ricarda Milstein, Jonas Schreyoegg
Across the member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), pay-for-performance (P4P) programs have been implemented in the inpatient sector to improve the quality of care provided by hospitals. This paper provides an overview of 34 existing P4P programs in the inpatient sector in 14 OECD countries based on a structured literature search in five databases to identify relevant sources in Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish...
September 20, 2016: Health Policy
Dung Phung, Cordia Chu, Shannon Rutherford, Huong Lien Thi Nguyen, Cuong Manh Do, Cunrui Huang
The effects of heatwaves on morbidity in developing and tropical countries have not been well explored. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between heatwaves and hospitalization and the potential influence of socio-economic factors on this relationship in Vietnam. Generalized Linear Models (GLM) with Poisson family and Distributed Lag Models (DLM) were applied to evaluate the effect of heatwaves for each province (province-level effect). A random-effects meta-analysis was applied to calculate the pooled estimates (country-level effects) for 'all causes', infectious, cardiovascular, and respiratory admissions queried by lag days, regions, sex, and ages...
October 13, 2016: Environmental Pollution
Brent Robert Heard, Shelie A Miller
The unbroken global refrigerated supply chain, or cold chain, is rapidly expanding in developing countries. In addition to increasing the energy intensity of the food system, the expanded cold chain may facilitate changes in the global diet, food waste patterns, food production and distribution, and shopping habits. The sustainability impacts of many of these changes chain are unknown, given the complexity of interacting social, economic, and technical factors. The current literature surrounding the environmental impacts of refrigeration in the food system focuses on the direct impacts of energy use and coolant emissions, and lacks a critical evaluation of the accompanying systemic societal changes that potentially carry greater environmental impacts...
October 14, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
D Ayoub, L R Lopetuso, F Chamseddine, A Dajani, K Lahiri, H Mahmoud, M S Miqdady, G Zirizzotti, M A Sultan, F Franceschi, A Gasbarrini
OBJECTIVE: Gastroenteritis represents with respiratory tract infection the most common infectious disease syndrome of humans in developing countries. Gut microbiota regional variation and dysbiosis play a crucial role in triggering and worsening this devastating GI disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: With this manuscript, we want to explore and emphasize the critical aspect of acute gastroenteritis in Middle-East Countries and its correlation with the clinical aspect of gut microbiota modification and intestinal homeostasis...
September 2016: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
Sujha Subramanian, Florence Tangka, Patrick Edwards, Sonja Hoover, Maggie Cole-Beebe
BACKGROUND: This article reports on the methods and framework we have developed to guide economic evaluation of noncommunicable disease registries. METHODS: We developed a cost data collection instrument, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) International Registry Costing Tool (IntRegCosting Tool), based on established economics methods We performed in-depth case studies, site visit interviews, and pilot testing in 11 registries from multiple countries including India, Kenya, Uganda, Colombia, and Barbados to assess the overall quality of the data collected from cancer and cardiovascular registries...
October 7, 2016: Cancer Epidemiology
Franco Matías Francisca, Marcos Alexis Montoro, Daniel Alejandro Glatstein
Landfill gas (LFG) management is one of the most important tasks for landfill operation and closure because of its impact in potential global warming. The aim of this work is to present a case history evaluating an LFG capture and treatment system for the present landfill facility in Cordoba, Argentina. The results may be relevant for many developing countries around the world where landfill gas is not being properly managed. The LFG generation is evaluated by modeling gas production applying the zero order model, Landfill Gas Generation Model (LandGEM - EPA), Scholl Canyon model and triangular model...
October 10, 2016: Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association
Arata Hidano, Tim E Carpenter, Mark A Stevenson, M Carolyn Gates
Many countries implement regionalisation as a measure to control economically important livestock diseases. Given that regionalisation highlights the difference in disease risk between animal subpopulations, this may discourage herd managers in low-risk areas from purchasing animals from high-risk areas to protect the disease-free status of their herds. Using bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in New Zealand as a case example, we develop a novel network simulation model to predict how much the frequency of cattle movements between different disease control areas (DCAs) could theoretically change if herd managers adopted the safest practices (preferentially purchasing cattle from areas with the lowest risk of bTB), if herd managers adopted the riskiest practices (preferentially purchasing cattle from areas with the greatest risk of bTB), or if herd managers made trade decisions completely at random (purchasing cattle without consideration for bTB disease risk)...
October 1, 2016: Preventive Veterinary Medicine
Ramy Salemdeeb, David Font Vivanco, Abir Al-Tabbaa, Erasmus K H J Zu Ermgassen
The environmental evaluation of food waste prevention is considered a challenging task due to the globalised nature of the food supply chain and the limitations of existing evaluation tools. The most significant of these is the rebound effect: the associated environmental burdens of substitutive consumption that arises as a result of economic savings made from food waste prevention. This study introduces a holistic approach to addressing these challenges, with a focus on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from household food waste in the UK...
October 4, 2016: Waste Management
Sorrel E Wolowacz, Andrew Briggs, Vasily Belozeroff, Philip Clarke, Lynda Doward, Ron Goeree, Andrew Lloyd, Richard Norman
Cost-utility models are increasingly used in many countries to establish whether the cost of a new intervention can be justified in terms of health benefits. Health-state utility (HSU) estimates (the preference for a given state of health on a cardinal scale where 0 represents dead and 1 represents full health) are typically among the most important and uncertain data inputs in cost-utility models. Clinical trials represent an important opportunity for the collection of health-utility data. However, trials designed primarily to evaluate efficacy and safety often present challenges to the optimal collection of HSU estimates for economic models...
September 2016: Value in Health: the Journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
E Yusuf, D S Y Ong, A Martin-Quiros, C Skevaki, J Cortez, K Dedić, A E Maraolo, D Dušek, P J Maver, M Sanguinetti, E Tacconelli
The purpose of this investigation was to perform a survey among European clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious disease (ID) trainees on training satisfaction, training tools, and competency assessment. An online, anonymous survey in the English language was carried out between April and July 2015. There were 25 questions: seven in a 5-point Likert scale (1: worst scenario, 5: best scenario) and the remainder as closed multiple-choice questions in five areas (satisfaction, adequacy, system, mentorship, and evaluation of training)...
October 4, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Krishna Prasad Acharya, Nirajan Niroula, Krishna Kaphle
Brucellosis is an abortifacient zoonotic disease which remains prominent in third world countries like Nepal. Brucellosis possess a public health concern, the incidences of which in livestocks can present substantial economic and health burdens for herders and health professionals. In Nepal, several cases of bovine including human brucellosis have been reported. This paper aims to evaluate the current status of the disease, the mechanism of infection, pathogenesis, zoonotic potential, diagnostic advances, treatment regimens, and the preventive measures that can be adopted in managing human brucellosis in under-developed countries like Nepal...
October 1, 2016: Epidemiology and Health
Carlos Martin-Saborido, Theodora Mouratidou, Anastasia Livaniou, Sandra Caldeira, Jan Wollgast
BACKGROUND: The adverse relation between dietary trans fatty acid (TFA) intake and coronary artery disease risk is well established. Many countries in the European Union (EU) and worldwide have implemented different policies to reduce the TFA intake of their populations. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the added value of EU-level action by estimating the cost-effectiveness of 3 possible EU-level policy measures to reduce population dietary TFA intake...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Dörthe Brüggmann, Christina Wagner, Doris Klingelhöfer, Norman Schöffel, Michael Bendels, Frank Louwen, Jenny Jaque, David A Groneberg
Maternal depression can be accounted for one of the most common complications during pregnancy and the postpartum period affecting women all over the world. So far, no detailed map of the worldwide maternal depression research architecture has been constructed, which encompasses aspects of research activity, quality, and also socioeconomic features. Using the NewQIS platform, density-equalizing mapping projections, scientometric techniques, and economic benchmarking procedures were applied to evaluate global maternal depression research for the period between 1900 and 2012...
September 27, 2016: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Christian Brengel, Andreas Thomann, Alexander Schifrin, Jens Eberhard, Rolf W Hartmann
Tuberculosis, which is predominantly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is still the most lethal bacterial infection with 1.5 million casualties in 2014. Moreover, the fact that the appearance of resistant mutants and long-term treatment are coupled with economic problems in developing countries hampers an efficient therapy. Interference with the essential cholesterol metabolism of Mtb could be a promising novel strategy to fight Mtb infections. CYP125, a P450 enzyme in Mtb, has been shown to play an important role in this metabolic pathway...
September 28, 2016: ChemMedChem
Philippa May, Asha Bowen, Steven Tong, Andrew Steer, Sam Prince, Ross Andrews, Bart Currie, Jonathan Carapetis
BACKGROUND: Impetigo, scabies, and fungal skin infections disproportionately affect populations in resource-limited settings. Evidence for standard treatment of skin infections predominantly stem from hospital-based studies in high-income countries. The evidence for treatment in resource-limited settings is less clear, as studies in these populations may lack randomisation and control groups for cultural, ethical or economic reasons. Likewise, a synthesis of the evidence for public health control within endemic populations is also lacking...
2016: Systematic Reviews
Nikki McCaffrey, Billingsley Kaambwa, David C Currow, Julie Ratcliffe
BACKGROUND: Although a five level version of the widely-used EuroQol 5 dimensions (EQ-5D) instrument has been developed, population norms are not yet available for Australia to inform the future valuation of health in economic evaluations. The aim of this study was to estimate HrQOL normative values for the EQ-5D-5L preference-based measure in a large, randomly selected, community sample in South Australia. METHODS: The EQ-5D-5L instrument was included in the 2013 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey, an interviewer-administered, face-to-face, cross-sectional survey...
2016: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Rafael Hernandez-Hernandez
For the last three-decade cardiovascular disease have been the principal causes of death in most Latin American countries. Their importance has been rising, as in developed countries; such as United State, the mortality rate for CV disease declined in LA rises as in the other developing countries.Cardiovascular risk factors epidemiological studies from LA tend to be limited, and with restrictions on the methodology for sampling and interpretation of results; making most of the studies little comparable each other;on the other hand, population characteristics from country to country and inside each country are so different in ethnicity, habits, socio-economic status which make difficult to integrate and compare results as a whole...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Susan Hillis, James Mercy, Janet Saul, Jessie Gleckel, Neetu Abad, Howard Kress
More than 1 billion children - half the children in the world - are victims of violence every year. As part of the Post-2015 sustainable development agenda, the UN has issued a global call-to-action: to eliminate violence against children. Essential to preventing violence against children is guidance to countries on using the best available evidence to address this problem. THRIVES provides this evidence. It represents a framework of complementary strategies that, taken together, have potential to achieve and sustain efforts to prevent violence against children...
September 2016: Journal of Public Health Policy
Lindsay McLaren, Nureen Sumar, Amanda M Barberio, Kathy Trieu, Diane L Lorenzetti, Valerie Tarasuk, Jacqui Webster, Norman Rc Campbell
BACKGROUND: Excess dietary sodium consumption is a risk factor for high blood pressure, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Currently, dietary sodium consumption in almost every country is too high. Excess sodium intake is associated with high blood pressure, which is common and costly and accounts for significant burden of disease. A large number of jurisdictions worldwide have implemented population-level dietary sodium reduction initiatives. No systematic review has examined the impact of these initiatives...
September 16, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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