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John S Bett
Cells have developed an evolutionary obligation to survey and maintain proteome fidelity and avoid the possible toxic consequences of protein misfolding and aggregation. Disturbances to protein homoeostasis (proteostasis) can result in severe cellular phenotypes and are closely linked with the accumulation of microscopically visible deposits of aggregated proteins. These include inclusion bodies found in AD (Alzheimer's disease), HD (Huntington's disease) and ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) patient neurons...
October 15, 2016: Essays in Biochemistry
Başak Akyıldız, Serkan Özsoylu, Mehmet Adnan Öztürk, Abdullah İnci, Önder Düzlü, Alparslan Yıldırım
Bee venom is a complex substance which acts in different ways; local or systemic anaphylaxis associated with IgE and direct toxic effects of the large volume of injected venom. We report a 10- year-old boy who was the vulnerable of 5989 honey bee attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this case had the ultimate number of honey bee stings in the literature, until now. He was admitted to pediatric intensive care unit after 3 hours of incident. Plasmapheresis was started to remove circulating venom that can cause many systemic side effects...
November 2015: Turkish Journal of Pediatrics
M Rodríguez-Arribas, S M S Yakhine-Diop, J M Bravo-San Pedro, P Gómez-Suaga, R Gómez-Sánchez, G Martínez-Chacón, J M Fuentes, R A González-Polo, M Niso-Santano
Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are structures that regulate physiological functions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to maintain calcium signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several proteins located in MAMs, including those encoded by PARK genes and some of neurodegeneration-related proteins (huntingtin, presenilin, etc.), ensure this regulation. In this regard, MAM alteration is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) and contributes to the appearance of the pathogenesis features, i...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Kodai Machida, Tomoaki Shigeta, Ayano Kobayashi, Ai Masumoto, Yuna Hidaka, Hiroaki Imataka
Protein misfolding and aggregation is one of the major causes of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. So far protein aggregation related to these diseases has been studied using animals, cultured cells or purified proteins. In this study, we show that a newly synthesized polyglutamine protein implicated in Huntington's disease forms large aggregates in HeLa cells, and successfully recapitulate the process of this aggregation using a translation-based system derived from HeLa cell extracts...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Biotechnology
Karen Manoutcharian, Roxanna Perez-Garmendia, Goar Gevorkian
Recombinant antibody fragments are promising alternatives to full-length immunoglobulins and offer important advantages compared with conventional monoclonal antibodies: extreme specificity, higher affinity, superior stability and solubility, reduced immunogenicity as well as easy and inexpensive large-scale production. Different antibody formats such as single-chain fragment variable (scFv), single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs or sdAbs), bispecific antibodies (bsAbs), intrabodies and nanobodies, are currently being studied in pre-clinical models of cancer as well as infectious and autoimmune diseases and many of them are being tested as therapeutics in clinical trials...
September 30, 2016: Current Neuropharmacology
Charles Van Liew, Maya S Santoro, Jody Goldstein, Shea Gluhm, Paul E Gilbert, Jody Corey-Bloom
We sought to investigate whether the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) could provide a brief assessment of recall and recognition using Huntington disease (HD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) as disorders characterized by different memory deficits. This study included 80 participants with HD, 64 participants with AD, and 183 community-dwelling control participants. Random-effects hierarchical logistic regressions were performed to assess the relative performance of the normal control (NC), participants with HD, and participants with AD on verbal free recall, cued recall, and multiple-choice recognition on the MoCA...
September 26, 2016: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Regine Hengge
The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP controls bacterial biofilm formation, motility, cell cycle progression, development and virulence. It is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (with GGDEF domains), degraded by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs, with EAL of HD-GYP domains) and sensed by a wide variety of c-di-GMP-binding effectors that control diverse targets. c-di-GMP-binding effectors can be riboswitches as well as proteins with highly diverse structures and functions. The latter include 'degenerate' GGDEF/EAL domain proteins that are enzymatically inactive but still able to bind c-di-GMP...
November 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Senthilkumar Rajagopal, Supraj Raja Sangam, Shubham Singh, Venkateswara Rao Joginapally
Proteins are playing a vital role in maintaining the cellular integrity and function, as well as for brain cells. Protein intake and supplementation of individual amino acids can affect the brain functioning and mental health, and many of the neurotransmitters in the brain are made from amino acids. The amino acid supplementation has been found to reduce symptoms, as they are converted into neurotransmitters which in turn extenuate the mental disorders. The biosynthesis of amino acids in the brain is regulated by the concentration of amino acids in plasma...
2016: Advances in Neurobiology
Preetham Elumalai, Sreeja Lakshmi
Neurodegenerative disorders are often life threatening and hired as an economic burden to the health-care system. Nutritional interventions principally involving polyphenols were practiced to arrest or reverse the age-related health disorders. Flavonoids, a class of dietary polyphenols, are rising to superstardom in preventing brain disorders with their potent antioxidant defense mechanism. Quercetin is a ubiquitous flavonoid reported to have all-natural myriad of health benefits. Citrus fruits, apple, onion, parsley, berries, green tea, and red wine comprise the major dietary supplements of quercetin apart from some herbal remedies like Ginkgo biloba...
2016: Advances in Neurobiology
Tammy D Barry, Raymond A Sturner, Karen Seymour, Barbara H Howard, Lucy McGoron, Paul Bergmann, Ronald Kent, Casey Sullivan, Theodore S Tomeny, Jessica S Pierce, Kristen L Coin, James K Goodlad, Nichole Werle
This report describes a school-based screening project to improve early identification of children at risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and communicate these concerns to parents, recommending that they contact their child's primary care provider (PCP). Of 17,440 eligible children in first through fifth grades in five school districts, 47.0% of parents provided required written consent, and teachers completed 70.4% of the online screeners (using the Vanderbilt AD/HD Diagnostic Teacher Rating Scale)...
2016: Children's Health Care: Journal of the Association for the Care of Children's Health
Yazan Samhouri, Mohammad Telfah, Ruth Kouides, Timothy Woodlock
BACKGROUND: Thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life-threatening condition which can lead to extensive thrombosis. Diagnosis of HIT relies on clinical suspicion determined by 4T score and immunoassays through testing for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. Clinical practice guidelines published by the American Society of Hematology in 2013 recommended use of the 4T score before ordering the immunoassays as a measure of pretest probability...
2016: Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives
Dexiang Liu, Zunji Ke, Jia Luo
Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient and indispensable for normal growth and development of the organism due to its multilateral participation in key biochemical and physiological processes. Humans must obtain thiamine from their diet since it is synthesized only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can result from inadequate intake, increased requirement, excessive deletion, and chronic alcohol consumption. TD affects multiple organ systems, including the cardiovascular, muscular, gastrointestinal, and central and peripheral nervous systems...
September 5, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Masaru Obokata, Hiroaki Sunaga, Hideki Ishida, Kyoko Ito, Tetsuya Ogawa, Yoshitaka Ando, Masahiko Kurabayashi, Kazuaki Negishi
UNLABELLED: End-stage renal disease is a major clinical and public health problem, and cardiovascular disease accounts for half of the mortality in hemodialysis patients. An existing mortality risk score (AROii score) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level have modest predictive power, but there is room for improvement. There are emerging cardiac biomarkers (soluble isoforms of ST2 [sST2], galectin-3 [Gal-3]), and uremic toxicity (indoxyl sulfate). We sought to determine whether these biomarkers predict cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients and have incremental prognostic value over the clinical score and NT-proBNP level...
September 2016: American Heart Journal
Honglin Dong, Laura J Sargent, Yianna Chatzidiakou, Caroline Saunders, Laura Harkness, Nicolas Bordenave, Ian Rowland, Jeremy P E Spencer, Julie A Lovegrove
Dietary fibre has been shown to increase subjective satiating ratings. However data from human trials has produced mixed results, possibly due to different types of fibre which have diverse physicochemical properties and gastrointestinal transit behaviour. The aim of the study 1 was to investigate whether orange juice (OJ) with 5.5 g of added orange pomace fibre (OPF) was as satiating as whole orange (WO, chopped AND blended to a liquid form) compared with OJ. Study 2 was to evaluate the dose-dependent satiating effect of OPF delivered in an orange-flavoured beverage...
August 27, 2016: Appetite
Adam R Clarke, Robert J Barry, Iris E Baker, Rory McCarthy, Mark Selikowitz
Stimulant medications are the most commonly prescribed treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). These medications result in a normalization of the EEG. However, past research has found that complete normalization of the EEG is not always achieved. One reason for this may be that studies have used different medications interchangeably, or groups of subjects on different stimulants. This study investigated whether methylphenidate and dexamphetamine produce different levels of normalization of the EEG in children with AD/HD...
August 23, 2016: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience: Official Journal of the EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ENCS)
Linda Møllersen, Olve Moldestad, Alexander D Rowe, Anja Bjølgerud, Ingunn Holm, Linda Tveterås, Arne Klungland, Lars Retterstøl
BACKGROUND: Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG repeat expansions in the HTT gene. Somatic repeat expansion in the R6/1 mouse model of HD depends on mismatch repair and is worsened by base excision repair initiated by the 7,8-dihydroxy-8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) or Nei-like 1 (Neil1). Ogg1 and Neil1 repairs common oxidative lesions. METHODS: We investigated whether anthocyanin antioxidants added daily to the drinking water could affect CAG repeat instability in several organs and behaviour in R6/1 HD mice...
2016: PLoS Currents
Jihene Fendri, Laura Palcau, Lucie Cameliere, Olivier Coffin, Aurelien Felisaz, Djelloul Gouicem, Julie Dufranc, Damien Laneelle, Ludovic Berger
: The donor artery after a long-standing arteriovenous fistula (AVF) for hemodialysis usually evolves exceptionally towards a true aneurysmal degeneration. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper was to describe true brachial artery AD in ESRD patients after AVF creation, as well as its influencing factors and treatment strategies. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We present a retrospective, observational, single centre study realized in Caen University Hospital's Vascular Surgery Department from May 1996 to November 2015...
August 12, 2016: Annals of Vascular Surgery
Sandeep K Sharma, Smriti Priya
Protein misfolding under stressful environmental conditions cause several cellular problems owing to the disturbed cellular protein homeostasis, which may further lead to neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Amyloid lateral sclerosis and Huntington disease (HD). The presence of cellular defense mechanisms like molecular chaperones and proteasomal degradation systems prevent protein misfolding and aggregation. Molecular chaperones plays primary role in preventing protein misfolding by mediating proper native folding, unfolding and refolding of the polypeptides along with vast number of cellular functions...
August 13, 2016: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
Swati Agarwal, Anuradha Yadav, Rajnish Kumar Chaturvedi
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors and they serve to be a promising therapeutic target for several neurodegenerative disorders, which includes Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PPARs play an important role in the downregulation of mitochondrial dysfunction, proteasomal dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation, which are the major causes of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we discuss about the role of PPARs as therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative disorders...
August 8, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Hannah Gilbert, Ling Qin, Dandan Li, Xuehua Zhang, Stuart J Johnstone
The current gold standard for the diagnosis of AD/HD is based on subjective reports from teachers, parents, and clinicians. These measures can be problematic as they are open to rater biases and also fail to account for the developmental nature of symptoms. The current study examined the diagnostic accuracy of two objective measures, a computer-based Continuous Performance Task and actigraphy (e.g. motion tracking device) in differentiating children with AD/HD (N=70) from healthy controls (N=70). It was predicted that task-unrelated movement (measured via actigraphy) during a CPT and CPT performance would have high classification accuracy in differentiating children with AD/HD from healthy controls, and that the inclusion of age would increase this accuracy...
August 3, 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
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