keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Facial reanimation

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930763/association-among-facial-paralysis-depression-and-quality-of-life-in-facial-plastic-surgery-patients
#1
Jason C Nellis, Masaru Ishii, Patrick J Byrne, Kofi D O Boahene, Jacob K Dey, Lisa E Ishii
Importance: Though anecdotally linked, few studies have investigated the impact of facial paralysis on depression and quality of life (QOL). Objective: To measure the association between depression, QOL, and facial paralysis in patients seeking treatment at a facial plastic surgery clinic. Design, Setting, Participants: Data were prospectively collected for patients with all-cause facial paralysis and control patients initially presenting to a facial plastic surgery clinic from 2013 to 2015...
December 8, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929602/facial-reanimation-according-to-the-postresection-defect-during-lateral-skull-base-surgery
#2
John P Leonetti, Sahar Nadimi, Sam J Marzo, Douglas Anderson, Darl Vandevender
The vast majority of benign tumors of the cerebellopontine angle, temporal bone, and parotid gland can be successfully resected without permanent injury to the facial nerve. Malignant tumors or recurrent disease may require facial nerve sacrifice, especially if preoperative facial paresis is present. This article will present case examples of the various methods to reconstruct facial animation after lateral skull base resections that require sacrifice of cranial nerve VII, and the associated mimetic facial musculature...
December 2016: Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892977/societal-value-of-surgery-for-facial-reanimation
#3
Peiyi Su, Lisa E Ishii, Andrew Joseph, Jason Nellis, Jacob Dey, Kristin Bater, Patrick J Byrne, Kofi D O Boahene, Masaru Ishii
Importance: Patients with facial paralysis are perceived negatively by society in a number of domains. Society's perception of the health utility of varying degrees of facial paralysis and the value society places on reconstructive surgery for facial reanimation need to be quantified. Objective: To measure health state utility of varying degrees of facial paralysis, willingness to pay (WTP) for a repair, and the subsequent value of facial reanimation surgery as perceived by society...
November 17, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27757349/cross-face-nerve-grafting-with-infraorbital-nerve-pathway-protection-anatomic-and-histomorphometric-feasibility-study
#4
Joseph Catapano, Daniel R B Demsey, Emily S Ho, Ronald M Zuker, Gregory H Borschel
Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27740958/the-spinal-accessory-nerve-for-functional-muscle-innervation-in-facial-reanimation-surgery-an-anatomical-and-histomorphometric-study
#5
Eva Placheta, Ines Tinhofer, Melanie Schmid, Lukas F Reissig, Igor Pona, Wolfgang Weninger, Thomas Rath, David Chwei-Chin Chuang, Chieh-Han John Tzou
INTRODUCTION: Facial reanimation surgery is performed in severe cases of facial palsy to restore facial function. In a 1-stage procedure, the spinal accessory nerve can be used as a donor nerve to power a free gracilis muscle transplant for the reanimation of the mouth. The aim of this study was to describe the surgical anatomy of the spinal accessory nerve, provide a guide for reliable donor nerve dissection, and analyze the available donor axon counts. METHODS: Dissections were performed on 10 nonembalmed cadavers (measurements of 20 nerves)...
October 6, 2016: Annals of Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27729154/enhancing-surgical-outcomes-the-effects-of-speech-therapy-on-a-school-aged-girl-with-moebius-syndrome
#6
Elizabeth Fairgray, Anna Miles
PURPOSE: Moebius Syndrome is a rare congenital neurological condition often characterized by multiple cranial nerve involvement. This case study presents an eight-year old girl with Moebius Syndrome (MC) who received 30 sessions of speech therapy. This occurred after presenting to clinic 11 months after left facial reanimation with gracilis thigh muscle transfer surgery. On examination, only flickers of left facial movement were observed. There was no movement on the right side of the face...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27684271/facial-reanimation-using-hypoglossal-facial-nerve-anastomosis-after-schwannoma-removal
#7
Ji Hyuk Han, Mischelle J Suh, Jin Won Kim, Hyun Sang Cho, In Seok Moon
CONCLUSION: In this series, the split type hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis resulted in more favorable outcomes in terms of both facial function and tongue atrophy. OBJECTIVE: This study compared surgical techniques for hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis after schwannoma removal and evaluated which technique achieves better facial outcomes and less tongue morbidity. METHOD: This study included 14 patients who underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis after schwannoma removal and were followed for more than 1 year...
August 12, 2016: Acta Oto-laryngologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27677201/body-proportions-as-possible-predictors-for-free-gracilis-one-stage-facial-reanimation
#8
M Bohac, M Palkovic, J Fedeles, J Hodosy
BACKGROUND: Gracilis muscle and its motor nerve belongs to most commonly used flap for facial reanimation. However, it is performed in two steps, which is time consuming. One stage technique can be also performed, but the length of the motor nerve cannot be currently determined before surgery. AIM: The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the body composition on the length and suitability of the motor nerve of gracilis muscle for one stage facial reanimation...
2016: Bratislavské Lekárske Listy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27667528/reanimation-surgery-in-patients-with-acquired-bilateral-facial-palsy
#9
D P Butler, K S Johal, D H Harrison, A O Grobbelaar
Acquired bilateral facial palsy is rare and causes difficulty with speech and eating, but dynamic reanimation of the face can reduce the effect of these problems. Of 712 patients who had these procedures during our study period, two had an acquired bilateral facial paralysis. In both, reanimation was completed in a single operation using a free-functional transfer of the latissimus dorsi muscle that was coapted to the masseteric branch of the trigeminal nerve. Both patients achieved excellent non-spontaneous excursion and an improvement in function...
September 22, 2016: British Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27632395/facial-nerve-axonal-analysis-and-anatomic-localization-in-donor-nerve-optimizing-axonal-load-for-cross-facial-nerve-grafting-in-facial-reanimation
#10
Austin Hembd, Purushottam A Nagarkar, Salim Saba, Dinah Wan, J Walter Kutz, Brandon Isaacson, Sachin Gupta, Charles L White, Rod J Rohrich, Shai M Rozen
PURPOSE: Donor nerve axonal count over 900 in two-stage reconstructions using cross facial nerve grafts is possibly associated with improved outcomes in facial reanimation. Facial nerve axonal analysis was performed to determine the ideal location for optimizing axonal load. Correlation between axonal number, branch diameter, and age was also assessed. METHODS: 28 fresh unpreserved cadaveric hemi-faces were dissected exposing the extracranial facial nerve branches...
September 14, 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27556626/lengthening-temporalis-myoplasty-virtual-animation-assisted-technical-video
#11
Nawaf Aljudaibi, Yasmine Bennis, Veronique Duquennoy-Martinot, Daniel Labbé, Pierre Guerreschi
Lengthening temporalis myoplasty is a well-established procedure for dynamic palliative reanimation of the lip in facial palsy sequelae. The particularity of this technique is that the entire temporal muscle is transferred from the coronoid process to the upper half of the lip without interposition of aponeurotic tissue. To date, no video describing the technique was available. This is the first video describing the entire procedure, from preoperative markings through postoperative rehabilitation. In the video presented herein, the authors craft virtual three-dimensional animations in addition to a live operation on a patient performed by Daniel Labbé, who first described this technique 20 years ago...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27556625/the-deep-temporal-nerve-transfer-an-anatomical-feasibility-study-and-implications-for-upper-facial-reanimation
#12
Phillip B Dauwe, Austin Hembd, Erika De La Concha-Blankenagel, Salim Saba, Charles White, Alexander Cardenas-Mejia, Shai M Rozen
BACKGROUND: Facial paralysis has a profound impact on the brow, and currently static procedures are the mainstay of treatment. The deep temporal branches of the trigeminal nerve, given their proximity to the brow, may serve as possible donor nerves for both potential innervation of a free muscle transfer in patients with prolonged facial palsy or nerve transfers in acute or subacute palsy. As such, the authors present the detailed surgical anatomy of the deep temporal nerve, assessing feasibility for both functional muscle and nerve transfers, including a proposed surgical technique...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27513774/correction-of-residual-static-and-dynamic-labial-deviations-in-a-paralyzed-face-after-free-gracilis-muscle-transplantation
#13
Ricardo Horta, Inês Correia-Sá, Ricardo Nascimento, Alvaro Silva, José Amarante
Free muscle flap transfer is currently the procedure of choice for longstanding facial paralysis to restore symmetry both at rest and when smiling. However, movements obtained are generally localized, unidirectional, and philtrum centralization and lower lip movement is not proportionally achieved. The stability of free flap insertion at the lips also interferes with the results, as gradual disinsertion and shifting of the nasolabial fold can be caused by repetitive movements. Asymmetry of smile can also be caused by lip depressor inactivity due to marginal mandibular paralysis, and both dynamic and static procedures are often required after dynamic reanimation...
August 10, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27501201/free-anterolateral-thigh-flap-and-masseter-nerve-transfer-for-reconstruction-of-extensive-periauricular-defects-surgical-technique-and-clinical-outcomes
#14
Lara Cristóbal, Sora Linder, Beatriz Lopez, Maria Mani, Andres Rodríguez-Lorenzo
BACKGROUND: Radical tumor ablation in the periauricular area often results in extensive soft tissue defects, including facial nerve sacrifice, bone and/or dura defects. Reconstruction of these defects should aim at restoring facial reanimation, wound closure, and facial and neck contours. We present our experience using free anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) in combination with masseter nerve to facial nerve transfer in managing complex defects in the periauricular area. METHODS: Between 2011 and 2015 six patients underwent a combined procedure of ALT flap reconstruction and masseter nerve transfer, to reconstruct extensive, post tumor resection, periauricular defects...
August 8, 2016: Microsurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27460946/spontaneity-of-smile-after-facial-paralysis-rehabilitation-when-using-a-non-facial-donor-nerve
#15
Bernardo Hontanilla, Alvaro Cabello
INTRODUCTION: The current focus in dynamic reanimation of facial paralysis lies not only in restoring movement but also regaining smile spontaneity. It has been argued that a spontaneous smile can only be achieved using the contralateral facial nerve as donor via cross-face nerve grafting. Techniques based on the motor nerve to the masseter, however, have shown good rates of spontaneity as well. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with complete facial paralysis reanimated using free gracilis to masseteric nerve or masseteric-to-facial nerve transfer were included...
September 2016: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27400842/controversies-in-contemporary-facial-reanimation
#16
REVIEW
Leslie Kim, Patrick J Byrne
Facial palsy is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial implications. Although the complexity of facial expression and intricate synergy of facial mimetic muscles are difficult to restore, the goal of management is to reestablish facial symmetry and movement. Facial reanimation surgery requires an individualized treatment approach based on the cause, pattern, and duration of facial palsy while considering patient age, comorbidities, motivation, and goals. Contemporary reconstructive options include a spectrum of static and dynamic procedures...
August 2016: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27400838/controversies-in-parotid-defect-reconstruction
#17
REVIEW
Matthew Tamplen, P Daniel Knott, Michael A Fritz, Rahul Seth
Reconstruction of the parotid defect is a complex topic that encompasses restoration of both facial form and function. The reconstructive surgeon must consider facial contour, avoidance of Frey syndrome, skin coverage, tumor surveillance, potential adjuvant therapy, and facial reanimation when addressing parotid defects. With each defect there are several options within the reconstructive ladder, creating controversies regarding optimal management. This article describes surgical approaches to reconstruction of parotid defects, highlighting areas of controversy...
August 2016: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27364924/lengthening-temporalis-myoplasty-versus-free-muscle-transfer-with-the-gracilis-flap-for-long-standing-facial-paralysis-a-systematic-review-of-outcomes
#18
Rafael Bos, Srivinas Gosla Reddy, Maurice Y Mommaerts
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to compare the outcomes of reconstructive surgery for long-standing facial paralysis by gracilis free flap transfer versus lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM) according to Daniel Labbé. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, Cochrane Library, Directory of Open Access Journals, and SAGE Premier 2011 database were electronically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), and case series with a sample size > 5 were sought...
August 2016: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27353412/facial-nerve-repair-after-operative-injury-impact-of-timing-on-hypoglossal-facial-nerve-graft-outcomes
#19
Robert J Yawn, Harry V Wright, David O Francis, Scott Stephan, Marc L Bennett
PURPOSE: Reanimation of facial paralysis is a complex problem with multiple treatment options. One option is hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting, which can be performed in the immediate postoperative period after nerve transection, or in a delayed setting after skull base surgery when the nerve is anatomically intact but function is poor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of timing of hypoglossal-facial grafting on functional outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case series from a single tertiary otologic referral center was performed identifying 60 patients with facial nerve injury following cerebellopontine angle tumor extirpation...
May 17, 2016: American Journal of Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27348018/transposition-of-the-intratemporal-facial-to-hypoglossal-nerve-for-reanimation-of-the-paralyzed-face-the-vii-to-xii-transpositiontechnique
#20
Amit Kochhar, Monirah Albathi, Jeffrey D Sharon, Lisa E Ishii, Patrick Byrne, Kofi D Boahene
IMPORTANCE: The hypoglossal nerve has long been an axonal source for reinnervation of the paralyzed face. In this study, we report our experience with transposition of the intratemporal facial nerve to the hypoglossal nerve for facial reanimation. OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility and outcomes of the transposition of the infratemeporal facial nerve for end-to-side coaptation to the hypoglossal nerve for facial reanimation. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: A case series of 20 patients with facial paralysis who underwent mobilization and transposition of the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve for an end-to-side coaptation to the hypoglossal nerve (the VII to XII technique)...
September 1, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
keyword
keyword
20503
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"