keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Facial reanimation

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29706553/keeping-the-fat-on-the-right-spot-prevents-contour-deformity-in-temporalis-muscle-transposition
#1
Martinus M van Veen, Steven F S Korteweg, Pieter U Dijkstra, Paul M N Werker
The temporalis muscle transposition is a reliable, one-stage reanimation technique for longstanding facial paralysis. In the variation described by Rubin, the muscle is released from the temporal bone and folded over the zygomatic arch towards the modiolus. This results in unsightly temporal hollowing and zygomatic bulging. We present a modification of this technique, which preserves the temporal fat pad in its anatomical location as well as conceals temporal hollowing and prevents zygomatic bulging. The data of 23 patients treated with this modification were analysed...
April 13, 2018: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701919/electrophysiological-assessment-of-a-peptide-amphiphile-nanofiber-nerve-graft-for-facial-nerve-repair
#2
Jacqueline J Greene, Mark T McClendon, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Zaida Álvarez, Samuel I Stupp, Claus-Peter Richter
Facial nerve injury can cause severe long-term physical and psychological morbidity. There are limited repair options for an acutely transected facial nerve not amenable to primary neurorrhaphy. We hypothesize that a peptide amphiphile nanofiber neurograft may provide the nanostructure necessary to guide organized neural regeneration. Five experimental groups were compared, animals with 1) an intact nerve, 2) following resection of a nerve segment, and following resection and immediate repair with either a 3) autograft (using the resected nerve segment), 4) neurograft, or 5) empty conduit...
April 27, 2018: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29697623/facial-reanimation-in-the-seventh-and-eighth-decades-of-life
#3
Austin Hembd, Bridget Harrison, Cynthia Souza Martins Rocha, Franklin de Souza Rocha, Khalil Chamseddin, Daniel Labbé, Alexander Cárdenas-Mejía, Shai M Rozen
BACKGROUND: Treatment of facial paralysis in the older population is often relegated to static rather than dynamic reanimation for fear of poor outcomes. This pervasive approach lacks physiologic foundation and is not evidence based. Thus, the authors present an extensive literature review demonstrating weak evidence supporting this misguided concept, followed by detailed outcomes from three centers of the largest reported series to date of patients older than 60 years after reanimation performed using three techniques-lengthening temporalis myoplasty, free functional muscle, and nerve transfers...
May 2018: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29668505/comparison-of-functional-results-after-cross-face-nerve-graft-spinal-accessory-nerve-and-masseter-nerve-innervated-gracilis-for-facial-paralysis-reconstruction-the-chang-gung-experience
#4
David Chwei-Chin Chuang, Johnny Chuieng-Yi Lu, Tommy Nai-Jen Chang, Vincent G Laurence
BACKGROUND: Using functioning free muscle transplantation (FFMT) for facial paralysis and postparalysis facial synkinesis reconstruction is our preferred technique. Gracilis was the first choice of muscle. Three motor neurotizers: cross-face nerve graft (CFNG), spinal accessory nerve (XI) and masseter nerve (V3) have been used as neurotizers for different indications. METHODS: A total of 362 cases of facial reanimation with FFMT were performed between 1986 and 2015...
April 17, 2018: Annals of Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29649064/incomplete-facial-paralysis-the-use-of-the-ipsilateral-residual-facial-nerve-as-a-donor-nerve-for-facial-reanimation
#5
Eyal Gur, Ron M Zuker, Arik Zaretski, David Leshem, Yoav Barnea, Ehud Arad, Ravit Yanko, Beni Meilik, Daniel J Kedar, Ehud Fliss
BACKGROUND: The reconstructive approach for incomplete facial paralysis is not yet determined. In this article we present a new surgical approach for patients with incomplete facial paralysis in which residual, ineffective movement is detected pre-operatively in the ipsilateral bucco-zygomatic territory of the paretic facial nerve. METHODS: Sixteen patients with incomplete facial paralysis were found eligible for the procedure and underwent one-stage facial reanimation by the senior author (E...
March 29, 2018: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29628301/functional-outcomes-assessment-following-free-muscle-transfer-for-dynamic-reconstruction-of-facial-paralysis-a-literature-review
#6
REVIEW
Anson Dong, Kevin J Zuo, Georgina Papadopoulos-Nydam, Jaret L Olson, Gordon H Wilkes, Jana Rieger
Facial reanimation provides patients affected by chronic facial paralysis a chance to regain basic human functions such as emotional expression, verbal communication, and oral competence for eating and swallowing, but there is still no consensus as to the best way to measure surgical outcomes. We performed a literature review to investigate the different functional outcomes that surgeons use to evaluate facial function after reanimation surgery, focusing on outcomes other than facial expressions such as speech, oral competence, and patient quality of life/satisfaction...
March 22, 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625866/mixed-facial-reanimation-technique-to-treat-paralysis-in-medium-term-cases
#7
Federico Biglioli, Federico Bolognesi, Fabiana Allevi, Dimitri Rabbiosi, Silvia Cupello, Antonino Previtera, Alessandro Lozza, Valeria M A Battista, Claudio Marchetti
Recent facial paralyses, in which fibrillations of the mimetic muscles are still detectable by electromyography (EMG), allow facial reanimation based on giving new neural stimuli to musculature. However, if more time has elapsed, mimetic muscles can undergo irreversible atrophy, and providing a new neural stimulus is simply not effective. In these cases function is provided by transferring free flaps into the face or transposing masticatory muscles to reinstitute major movements, such as eyelid closure and smiling...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29603352/comparison-of-symmetry-after-smile-reconstruction-for-flaccid-facial-paralysis-with-combined-fascia-lata-grafts-and-functional-gracilis-transfer-for-static-suspension-or-gracilis-transfer-alone
#8
Jurij Kiefer, David Braig, Jan R Thiele, Holger Bannasch, G Björn Stark, Steffen U Eisenhardt
PURPOSE: Facial paralysis has a profound impact on functionality and esthetics of the oral region. In patients with strong skin laxity and soft tissue ptosis, functional smile reconstruction is challenging due to the accentuated asymmetry at rest. Thus, the purpose of the study was to analyze facial symmetry in this patient clientele following a combination of dynamic reanimation with fascial strips for static suspension compared to functional gracilis transfer alone. METHODS: In 2014, we altered the single-stage approach for microsurgical smile reconstruction in patients with significant soft tissue ptosis by adding fascia lata grafts for static support...
March 30, 2018: Microsurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29595736/cranial-nerve-coactivation-and-implication-for-nerve-transfers-to-the-facial-nerve
#9
David Jensson, Sara Enghag, Nina Bylund, Lars Jonsson, Johan Wikström, Margareta Grindlund, Roland Flink, Andres Rodriguez-Lorenzo
In reanimation surgery, effortless smile can be achieved by a nonfacial donor nerve. The underlying mechanisms for this smile development, and which is the best nonfacial neurotizer, need further clarification. The aim of the present study was therefore to further explore the natural coactivation between facial mimic muscles and muscles innervated by the most common donor nerves used in smile reanimation. The study was conducted in 10 healthy adults. Correlation between voluntary facial muscle movements and simultaneous electromyographic activity in muscles innervated by the masseter, hypoglossal, and spinal accessory nerves was assessed...
April 2018: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29576457/the-effect-of-template-based-sequential-tbs-coding-on-an-nhs-plastic-surgical-practice
#10
Ruben Y Kannan, Catriona Neville, Tamsin Gwynn, Vanessa Venables, Raman Malhotra, Charles Nduka
INTRODUCTION: Clinical coding is often a mystery to us surgeons, but in actuality, it has a huge bearing on the financial sustainability of our services. Given the rapid innovations in plastic surgical procedures, clinical coders often struggle to decipher the extent of surgery. Meeting midway is the way forward here. METHODS: In a prospective audit over a six-month period, we analysed data from 2586 patients in our practice: a combination of general plastic surgery and specialist facial reanimation services...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29566121/the-multivector-gracilis-free-functional-muscle-flap-for-facial-reanimation
#11
Kofi O Boahene, James Owusu, Lisa Ishii, Masaru Ishii, Shaun Desai, Irene Kim, Leslie Kim, Patrick Byrne
Importance: A multivector functional muscle flap that closely simulates the biomechanical effects of facial muscle groups is essential for complete smile restoration after facial paralysis. Objective: To determine the feasibility of a multivector gracilis muscle flap design for reanimation after facial paralysis and to analyze the effect on the smile display zone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective analysis of patients who underwent a double paddle multivector gracilis flap for complete facial paralysis between June 2015 and December 2016 was carried out in a tertiary hospital...
March 22, 2018: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29555150/investigation-of-the-activation-of-the-temporalis-and-masseter-muscles-in-voluntary-and-spontaneous-smile-production
#12
Jessica E Steele, Ian R Woodcock, Adrian D Murphy, Monique M Ryan, Tony J Penington, Christopher J Coombs
INTRODUCTION: Masticatory muscles or their nerve supply are options for facial reanimation surgery, but their ability to create spontaneous smile has been questioned. This study assessed the percentage of healthy adults who activate the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. METHODS: Healthy volunteer adults underwent electromyography (EMG) studies of the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. Responses were repeated three times and recorded as negative, weakly positive, or strongly positive according to the activity observed...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452877/the-split-hypoglossal-nerve-versus-the-cross-face-nerve-graft-to-supply-the-free-functional-muscle-transfer-for-facial-reanimation-a-comparative-study
#13
Tarek A Amer, Mohamed S El Kholy
Long-standing cases of facial paralysis are currently treated with free functional muscle transfer. Several nerves are mentioned in the literature to supply the free muscle transfer. The aim of this study is to compare the split hypoglossal nerve and the cross-face nerve graft to supply the free functional muscle transfer in facial reanimation. Of 94 patients with long-standing, unilateral facial palsy, 49 were treated using the latissimus dorsi muscle supplied by the split hypoglossal nerve, and 45 patients were treated using the latissmus dorsi muscle supplied by healthy contralateral buccal branch of the facial nerve...
May 2018: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29381636/the-distal-stump-of-the-intramuscular-motor-branch-of-the-obturator-nerve-is-useful-for-the-reconstruction-of-long-standing-facial-paralysis-using-a-double-powered-free-gracilis-muscle-flap-transfer
#14
Miyuki Uehara, Fumiaki Shimizu
BACKGROUND: Double innervation of the transferred muscle with the contralateral facial nerve and the ipsilateral masseteric nerve has recently been reported by some authors. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of our procedure of double innervation of free gracilis muscle for reconstruction of long-standing facial palsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In our department, 6 cases of long-standing facial paralysis (4 cases of complete palsy and 2 of incomplete palsy) were reconstructed using a free gracilis muscle double innervated with the masseteric and contralateral facial nerves...
March 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29369088/free-flaps-for-head-and-neck-cancer-in-paediatric-and-neonatal-patients
#15
Ross Elledge, Satyesh Parmar
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent literature on the subject of free tissue transfer options in paediatric head and neck surgery, with a particular emphasis on highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of different reconstructions in the paediatric patient. RECENT FINDINGS: Free tissue transfer in paediatric patients is predictable and applicable for a wide range of congenital and acquired defects in the head and neck. The free fibula flap is a mainstay of mandibular reconstruction and allows excellent implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation and growth potential at the recipient site with little or no donor site morbidity...
April 2018: Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29311017/reanimation-of-the-paralyzed-lids-by-cross-face-nerve-graft-and-platysma-transfer
#16
Federico Biglioli, Matteo Zago, Fabiana Allevi, Daniela Ciprandi, Giovanni Dell'Aversana Orabona, Valentina Pucciarelli, Dimitri Rabbiosi, Ilaria Pacifici, Filippo Tarabbia, Chiarella Sforza
Alterations of facial muscles may critically humper patients' quality of life. One of the worst conditions is the reduction or abolition of eye blinking. To prevent these adverse effects, surgical rehabilitation of eyelid function is the current treatment choice. In the present paper, we present a modification of the technique devised by Nassif to recover lids from long-standing paralysis. In our modification, the upper lid is rehabilitated by a platisma graft innervated by the contralateral facial nerve branches using a cross-face sural nerve graft...
March 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283938/immediate-hypoglossal-facial-anastomosis-in-patients-with-facial-interruption
#17
Sertac Yetiser
Hypoglossal-facial anastomosis provides excellent motor supply to the mimetic muscles of the face when there is no chance of recovery of the damaged facial nerve. However, to achieve optimal results, the timing of facial nerve surgery based on electrophysiological testing and clinical evaluation requires close follow-up of the patient. Functional results after delayed surgery are not predictable and depend on the number of surviving fibers, type of injury, severity of damage, degree of infiltration of inflammatory cells, and local fibrosis...
December 27, 2017: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29223635/three-dimensional-superimposition-for-patients-with-facial-palsy-an-innovative-method-for-assessing-the-success-of-facial-reanimation-procedures
#18
C Sforza, E Ulaj, D M Gibelli, F Allevi, V Pucciarelli, F Tarabbia, D Ciprandi, G Dell'Aversana Orabona, C Dolci, F Biglioli
Facial palsy is a severe condition that may be ameliorated by facial reanimation, but there is no consensus about how to judge its success. In this study we aimed to test a new method for assessing facial movements based on 3-dimensional analysis of the facial surfaces. Eleven patients aged between 42 and 77 years who had recently been affected by facial palsy (onset between 6 and 18 months) were treated by an operation based on triple innervation: the masseteric to temporofacial nerve branch, 30% of the hypoglossal fibres to the cervicofacial nerve branch, and the contralateral facial nerve through two cross-face sural nerve grafts...
January 2018: British Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222560/masseteric-nerve-transfer-for-facial-nerve-paralysis-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#19
Alexander W Murphey, William B Clinkscales, Samuel L Oyer
Importance: A review of the role of masseteric nerve transfer is needed to guide its use in facial reanimation. Objective: To systematically review the available literature, and, when applicable, analyze the combined outcomes of masseteric nerve transfer to better define its role in reanimation and to guide further research. Data Sources: Two independent researchers conducted the review using PubMed-NCBI and Scopus literature databases for studies on masseteric nerve transfer for facial nerve paralysis...
March 1, 2018: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29155463/free-gracilis-muscle-transfer-for-smile-reanimation-after-treatment-for-advanced-parotid-malignancy
#20
Callum Faris, Alyssa Heiser, Tessa Hadlock, Nate Jowett
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcomes of free gracilis muscle transfer for delayed smile reanimation after radical parotidectomy. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation after radical parotidectomy between 2003 and 2016 was performed. Patient-reported quality of life (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale [FaCE]), physician-reported facial function ("eFACE" facial grading scale), and oral commissure excursion were compared preoperatively and postoperatively...
March 2018: Head & Neck
keyword
keyword
20503
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"