Read by QxMD icon Read


Alonzo T Folger, Emily A Eismann, Nicole B Stephenson, Robert A Shapiro, Maurizio Macaluso, Maggie E Brownrigg, Robert J Gillespie
OBJECTIVES: The study objective was to determine if maternal and paternal exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a significant association with negative offspring development at 24 months of age in a suburban pediatric primary care population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 311 mother-child and 122 father-child dyads who attended a large pediatric primary care practice. Children were born from October 2012 to June 2014, and data were collected at the 2-, 4-, and 24-month well-child visits...
March 21, 2018: Pediatrics
Washington Gapare, Shiming Liu, Warren Conaty, Qian-Hao Zhu, Vanessa Gillespie, Danny Llewellyn, Warwick Stiller, Iain Wilson
Genomic selection (GS) has successfully been used in plant breeding to improve selection efficiency and reduce breeding time and cost. However, there has not been a study to evaluate GS prediction models that may be used for predicting cotton breeding lines across multiple environments. In this study, we evaluated the performance of Bayes Ridge Regression, BayesA, BayesB, BayesC and Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces regression models. We then extended the single-site GS model to accommodate genotype × environment interaction (G×E) in order to assess the merits of multi- over single-environment models in a practical breeding and selection context in cotton, a crop for which this has not previously been evaluated...
March 20, 2018: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Tayebeh Hasan Tehrani, Sadat Seyed Bagher Maddah, Masoud Fallahi-Khoshknab, Abbas Ebadi, Farahnaz Mohammadi Shahboulaghi, Mark Gillespie
BACKGROUND: Privacy is a complicated and obscure concept, which has special meanings in the healthcare environment; therefore, it is essential for healthcare providers to fully understand this concept. However, there is no universally accepted definition for this concept in the texts, and it has been interpreted differently, based on its application. AIM: To analyze and provide a clear and scientific definition for respect of privacy of hospitalized patients and identify the common aspects of this concept...
January 1, 2018: Nursing Ethics
Nikolai Czajkowski, Steven H Aggen, Robert F Krueger, Kenneth S Kendler, Michael C Neale, Gun Peggy Knudsen, Nathan A Gillespie, Espen Røysamb, Kristian Tambs, Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
OBJECTIVE: Both normative personality and DSM-IV personality disorders have been found to be heritable. However, there is limited knowledge about the extent to which the genetic and environmental influences underlying DSM personality disorders are shared with those of normative personality. The aims of this study were to assess the phenotypic similarity between normative and pathological personality and to investigate the extent to which genetic and environmental influences underlying individual differences in normative personality account for symptom variance across DSM-IV personality disorders...
March 21, 2018: American Journal of Psychiatry
Lewis S Gall, Paul Vulliamy, Scarlett Gillespie, Timothy F Jones, Rochelle S J Pierre, Sabine E Breukers, Christine Gaarder, Nicole P Juffermans, Marc Maegele, Jakob Stensballe, Pär I Johansson, Ross A Davenport, Karim Brohi
OBJECTIVE: To determine the characteristics of trauma patients with low levels of fibrinolysis as detected by viscoelastic hemostatic assay (VHA) and explore the underlying mechanisms of this subtype. BACKGROUND: Hyperfibrinolysis is a central component of acute traumatic coagulopathy but a group of patients present with low levels of VHA-detected fibrinolysis. There is concern that these patients may be at risk of thrombosis if empirically administered an antifibrinolytic agent...
March 19, 2018: Annals of Surgery
Baptiste Couvy-Duchesne, Victoria O'Callaghan, Richard Parker, Natalie Mills, Katherine M Kirk, Jan Scott, Anna Vinkhuyzen, Daniel F Hermens, Penelope A Lind, Tracey A Davenport, Jane M Burns, Melissa Connell, Brendan P Zietsch, James Scott, Margaret J Wright, Sarah E Medland, John McGrath, Nicholas G Martin, Ian B Hickie, Nathan A Gillespie
PURPOSE: The Nineteen and Up study (19Up) assessed a range of mental health and behavioural problems and associated risk factors in a genetically informative Australian cohort of young adult twins and their non-twin siblings. As such, 19Up enables detailed investigation of genetic and environmental pathways to mental illness and substance misuse within the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Sample (BLTS). PARTICIPANTS: Twins and their non-twin siblings from Queensland, Australia; mostly from European ancestry...
March 17, 2018: BMJ Open
Anna E Long, Isabel V Wilson, Dorothy J Becker, Ingrid M Libman, Vincent C Arena, F Susan Wong, Andrea K Steck, Marian J Rewers, Liping Yu, Peter Achenbach, Rosaura Casas, Johnny Ludvigsson, Alistair J K Williams, Kathleen M Gillespie
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Multiple islet autoimmunity increases risk of diabetes, but not all individuals positive for two or more islet autoantibodies progress to disease within a decade. Major islet autoantibodies recognise insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA), islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8A). Here we describe the baseline characteristics of a unique cohort of 'slow progressors' (n = 132) who were positive for multiple islet autoantibodies (IAA, GADA, IA-2A or ZnT8A) but did not progress to diabetes within 10 years...
March 12, 2018: Diabetologia
Sonia Altizer, Daniel J Becker, Jonathan H Epstein, Kristian M Forbes, Thomas R Gillespie, Richard J Hall, Dana M Hawley, Sonia M Hernandez, Lynn B Martin, Raina K Plowright, Dara A Satterfield, Daniel G Streicker
Human-provided resource subsidies for wildlife are diverse, common and have profound consequences for wildlife-pathogen interactions, as demonstrated by papers in this themed issue spanning empirical, theoretical and management perspectives from a range of study systems. Contributions cut across scales of organization, from the within-host dynamics of immune function, to population-level impacts on parasite transmission, to landscape- and regional-scale patterns of infection. In this concluding paper, we identify common threads and key findings from author contributions, including the consequences of resource subsidies for (i) host immunity; (ii) animal aggregation and contact rates; (iii) host movement and landscape-level infection patterns; and (iv) interspecific contacts and cross-species transmission...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Timothy C Bates, Brion S Maher, Sarah E Medland, Kerrie McAloney, Margaret J Wright, Narelle K Hansell, Kenneth S Kendler, Nicholas G Martin, Nathan A Gillespie
Research on environmental and genetic pathways to complex traits such as educational attainment (EA) is confounded by uncertainty over whether correlations reflect effects of transmitted parental genes, causal family environments, or some, possibly interactive, mixture of both. Thus, an aggregate of thousands of alleles associated with EA (a polygenic risk score; PRS) may tap parental behaviors and home environments promoting EA in the offspring. New methods for unpicking and determining these causal pathways are required...
March 13, 2018: Twin Research and Human Genetics: the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
Rosemary G Gillespie, Suresh P Benjamin, Michael S Brewer, Malia Ana J Rivera, George K Roderick
Insular adaptive radiations in which repeated bouts of diversification lead to phenotypically similar sets of taxa serve to highlight predictability in the evolutionary process [1]. However, examples of such replicated events are rare. Cross-clade comparisons of adaptive radiations are much needed to determine whether similar ecological opportunities can lead to the same outcomes. Here, we report a heretofore uncovered adaptive radiation of Hawaiian stick spiders (Theridiidae, Ariamnes) in which different species exhibit a set of discrete ecomorphs associated with different microhabitats...
February 27, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Ruth Bowness, Mark A J Chaplain, Gibin G Powathil, Stephen H Gillespie
If improvements are to be made in tuberculosis (TB) treatment, an increased understanding of disease in the lung is needed. Studies have shown that bacteria in a less metabolically active state, associated with the presence of lipid bodies, are less susceptible to antibiotics, and recent results have highlighted the disparity in concentration of different compounds into lesions. Treatment success therefore depends critically on the responses of the individual bacteria that constitute the infection. We propose a hybrid, individual-based approach that analyses spatio-temporal dynamics at the cellular level, linking the behaviour of individual bacteria and host cells with the macroscopic behaviour of the microenvironment...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Brigid M Gillespie, Emma Harbeck, Joanne Lavin, Therese Gardiner, Teresa K Withers, Andrea P Marshall
BACKGROUND: The surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) was introduced in 2008 to improve teamwork and reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with surgery. Although mandated in many health care institutions around the world, challenges in implementation of the SSC continue. To use Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) to help understand how/why implementation of a complex intervention coined Pass The Baton (PTB) could help explain what facets of the Surgical Safety Checklist use led to its' integration in practice, while others were not...
March 9, 2018: BMC Health Services Research
Gerry Fowkes, Ian N Gillespie
BACKGROUND: Intermittent claudication is pain in the legs due to muscle ischaemia associated with arterial stenosis or occlusion. Angioplasty is a technique that involves dilatation and recanalisation of a stenosed or occluded artery. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to determine the effects of angioplasty of arteries in the leg when compared with non surgical therapy, or no therapy, for people with mild to moderate intermittent claudication. SEARCH METHODS: Sources searched include the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group's Specialized Trials Register (August 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 3, 2006) and reference lists of relevant articles...
March 9, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Georgina M Williams, Patricia Neville, Kathleen M Gillespie, Sam D Leary, Julian P Hamilton-Shield, Aidan J Searle
OBJECTIVE: To understand how to maximise recruitment of young infants with Down's syndrome (DS) into research through qualitative interviews with parents and care providers. In complex neonatal and genetic conditions such as DS, frequently diagnosed after birth, parents may go through a period of adaptation. These factors need consideration when overcoming barriers to recruitment. PARTICIPANTS AND DESIGN: Participants, who were drawn from health professionals and volunteers working with families experiencing DS, were recruited using a purposive sampling strategy...
March 8, 2018: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Clive P Morgan, Hongyu Zhao, Meredith LeMasurier, Wei Xiong, Bifeng Pan, Piotr Kazmierczak, Matthew R Avenarius, Michael Bateschell, Ruby Larisch, Anthony J Ricci, Ulrich Müller, Peter G Barr-Gillespie
Hair cells of the inner ear transduce mechanical stimuli like sound or head movements into electrical signals, which are propagated to the central nervous system. The hair-cell mechanotransduction channel remains unidentified. We tested whether three transient receptor channel (TRP) family members, TRPV6, TRPM6 and TRPM7, were necessary for transduction. TRPV6 interacted with USH1C (harmonin), a scaffolding protein that participates in transduction. Using a cysteine-substitution knock-in mouse line and methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents selective for this allele, we found that inhibition of TRPV6 had no effect on transduction in mouse cochlear hair cells...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Katarína Bod'ová, Gabriel J Mitchell, Roy Harpaz, Elad Schneidman, Gašper Tkačik
Recent developments in automated tracking allow uninterrupted, high-resolution recording of animal trajectories, sometimes coupled with the identification of stereotyped changes of body pose or other behaviors of interest. Analysis and interpretation of such data represents a challenge: the timing of animal behaviors may be stochastic and modulated by kinematic variables, by the interaction with the environment or with the conspecifics within the animal group, and dependent on internal cognitive or behavioral state of the individual...
2018: PloS One
Carla I Mercado, Edward Gregg, Cathleen Gillespie, Fleetwood Loustalot
BACKGROUND: With a cholesterol-lowering focus for diabetic adults and in the age of polypharmacy, it is important to understand how lipid profile levels differ among those with and without diabetes. OBJECTIVE: Investigate the means, differences, and trends in lipid profile measures [TC, total cholesterol; LDL-c, low-density lipoprotein; HDL-c, high-density lipoprotein; and TG, triglycerides] among US adults by diabetes status and cholesterol-lowering medication...
2018: PloS One
Catherine W Gillespie, Pamela E Morin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research: the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
N A Gillespie, S H Aggen, M C Neale, G P Knudsen, R F Krueger, S C South, N Czajkowski, R Nesvåg, E Ystrom, K S Kendler, T Reichborn-Kjennerud
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Individual differences in DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) are associated with increased prevalence of substance use disorders. Our aims were to determine which combination of PDs trait scores best predict cannabis use (CU) and cannabis use disorder (CUD), and to estimate the size and significance of genetic and environmental risks in PD traits shared with CU and CUD. DESIGN: Linear mixed effects models were used to identify PD traits for inclusion in twin analyses to explore the genetic and environmental associations between the traits and cannabis use...
March 3, 2018: Addiction
Capri G Foy, Laura C Lovato, Mara Z Vitolins, Jeffrey T Bates, Ruth Campbell, William C Cushman, Stephen P Glasser, Avrum Gillespie, William J Kostis, Marie Krousel-Wood, Joseph B Muhlestein, Suzanne Oparil, Kwame Osei, Roberto Pisoni, Mark S Segal, Alan Wiggers, Karen C Johnson
BACKGROUND: To determine if the effects of intensive lowering of systolic blood pressure (goal of less than 120 mmHg) versus standard lowering (goal of less than 140 mmHg) upon cardiovascular, renal, and safety outcomes differed by gender. METHODS: Nine thousand three hundred and sixty-one men and women aged 50 years or older with systolic blood pressure of 130 mmHg or greater, taking 0-4 antihypertensive medications, and with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but free of diabetes, were randomly assigned to either a systolic blood pressure target of less than 120 mmHg (intensive treatment) or a target of less than 140 mmHg (standard treatment)...
April 2018: Journal of Hypertension
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"