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pediatric athlete

Thor S Stead, Vaibhav Rastogi, Vishnumurthy S Hedna, Latha Ganti
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to: 1) estimate the penetrance (in terms of youth coaches being aware of them) of the CDC "Heads Up!" guidelines, 2) determine whether these guidelines changed the coaches' practice, and 3) understand whether these guidelines resulted in a perceived decrease in the number of concussions. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey of pediatric sports coaches in the United States designed to assess the impact of the CDC "Heads Up!" GUIDELINES: "Heads Up!" Concussion in Youth Sports is a free, online course available to coaches, parents, and others helping to keep athletes safe from concussions...
August 29, 2016: Curēus
M Cody O'Dell, Diego Jaramillo, Laura Bancroft, Laura Varich, Gregory Logsdon, Sabah Servaes
With increasing participation and intensity of training in youth sports in the United States, the incidence of sports-related injuries is increasing, and the types of injuries are shifting. In this article, the authors review sports injuries of the lower extremity, including both acute and overuse injuries, that are common in or specific to the pediatric population. Common traumatic injuries that occur in individuals of all ages (eg, tears of the acetabular labrum and anterior cruciate ligament) are not addressed, although these occur routinely in pediatric sports...
October 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Jorge Delgado, Diego Jaramillo, Nancy A Chauvin
Increased physical activity in childhood has resulted in a large number of sports-related injuries. Although there is overlap between the sports-related injuries seen in pediatric and adult patients, important differences exist in the injury patterns of pediatric patients. These differences are related to the continuous changes in the developing skeleton and its relationship with adjacent soft tissues. The imbalance in strength between the growing bones and the nearby tendons and ligaments makes the bones prone to acute and chronic injuries...
October 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
James E Moyer, Jennifer M Brey
Shoulder injuries in pediatric athletes are typically caused by acute or overuse injuries. The developing structures of the shoulder lead to injury patterns that are distinct from those of adult athletes. Overuse injuries often affect the physeal structures of the proximal humerus and can lead to pain and loss of sports participation. Shoulder instability is common in pediatric athletes, and recurrence is also a concern in this population. Fractures of the proximal humerus and clavicle are typically treated with conservative management, but there is a trend toward surgical intervention...
October 2016: Orthopedic Clinics of North America
Alex L Gornitzky, R Justin Mistovich, Brittany Atuahuene, Eileen P Storey, Theodore J Ganley
BACKGROUND: Although repetitive microtrauma and athletic overuse patterns are most commonly associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), recent studies have identified a potential genetic predisposition for OCD. Several case series have documented family pedigrees that support autosomal-dominant inheritance, but the families in these studies were all selected as a result of unique histories that may not accurately represent OCD inheritance patterns at large. Because there has been little investigation beyond these case reports, we aimed to describe a broader, more representative pattern of OCD inheritance applicable to all affected patients...
September 6, 2016: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Andrew Pennock, Michael M Murphy, Mark Wu
The management of pediatric patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be a challenging endeavor for physicians, athletic trainers, coaches, and parents alike. In particular, the significant longitudinal growth that arises from the physes about the knee creates a unique set of circumstances that must be considered in this patient population. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the most recent current literature for the management of skeletally immature patients with an ACL tear...
September 1, 2016: Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine
Sarah S Jackson, Dai Sugimoto, David R Howell, William P Meehan, Andrea Stracciolini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Joel S Brenner
Sports specialization is becoming the norm in youth sports for a variety of reasons. When sports specialization occurs too early, detrimental effects may occur, both physically and psychologically. If the timing is correct and sports specialization is performed under the correct conditions, the athlete may be successful in reaching specific goals. Young athletes who train intensively, whether specialized or not, can also be at risk of adverse effects on the mind and body. The purpose of this clinical report is to assist pediatricians in counseling their young athlete patients and their parents regarding sports specialization and intensive training...
September 2016: Pediatrics
Kiery A Braithwaite, Kelley W Marshall
Injuries to the shoulder and elbow in the pediatric and adolescent throwing athlete are common. Both knowledge of throwing mechanics and understanding of normal bone development in the immature skeleton are key to the diagnosis, treatment, and potential prevention of these common injuries. Pathologic changes from chronic repetitive trauma to the developing shoulder and elbow manifest as distinctly different injuries that can be predicted by the skeletal maturation of the patient. Sites of vulnerability and resulting patterns of injury change as the child evolves from the skeletally immature little league player to the skeletally mature high school/college athlete...
September 2016: Radiologic Clinics of North America
Vin Shen Ban, James A Botros, Christopher J Madden, H Hunt Batjer
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Athletic neurosurgical emergencies are injuries that can lead to mortality or significant morbidity and require immediate recognition and treatment. This review article discusses the epidemiology of sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) with an attempt to quantify the incidence of neurosurgical emergencies in sports. Emergencies such as intracranial hemorrhage, second impact syndrome, vascular injuries, and seizures are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The incidence of sports-related TBI presenting to level I or II trauma centers in the USA is about 10 in 100,000 population per year...
September 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
Jeffrey J Nepple, Matthew D Milewski, Kevin G Shea
Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee remains a relatively common and poorly understood pediatric and adolescent knee condition. Both conservative and surgical treatments have major impact on the lives of young active, athletic patients with knee OCD. OCD has been recently redefined as a "focal, idiopathic alteration of subchondral bone with risk for instability and disruption of adjacent articular cartilage that may result in premature osteoarthritis." The 2011 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines found limited evidence for all aspects of the treatment of knee OCD...
October 2016: Journal of Knee Surgery
Nirav H Shelat, Georges Y El-Khoury
More children are participating in organized and recreational athletics at a younger age. It has been well documented that increased athletic specialization and year-round activities have resulted in higher incidences of overuse injuries, including stress fractures and stress reactions. Initially, stress fractures can be radiographically occult. Continued stress on the injured bone or cartilage can lead to progressive radiographic changes. Because of the prevalence of these injuries, both orthopedic surgeons and radiologists should be aware of the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of common stress fractures in children...
2016: Iowa Orthopaedic Journal
Kevin G Shea, Alexandra C Styhl, John C Jacobs, Theodore J Ganley, Matthew D Milewski, Peter C Cannamela, Allen F Anderson, John D Polousky
BACKGROUND: Young athletes sustain patellar dislocations in a variety of sports. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is a critical structure that functions as an anatomic checkrein to help prevent lateral patellar dislocation. Reconstruction of this ligament is challenging in patients with open physes because of concerns about iatrogenic damage to the femoral physis. PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship of the distal femoral physis and the MPFL. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive laboratory study...
July 29, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
Julie A Neumann, Sandeep Mannava, Christopher E Gross, Benjamin M Wooster, Michael T Busch
Symptomatic subfibular and/or lateral talocalcaneal impingement in pediatric patients may result from an accessory anterolateral talar facet (AALTF). This impingement may cause pain and disability and may limit athletic performance in high-level athletes. We report the case of a 12-year-old female competitive gymnast who had refractory, lateral-sided right ankle pain for 4 months and underwent right ankle arthroscopic resection of the AALTF causing impingement. Standard medial and anterolateral portals with the addition of an accessory anterolateral-distal portal were used in conjunction with a 30° 2...
April 2016: Arthroscopy Techniques
Lindsay D Nelson, Michelle M Loman, Ashley A LaRoche, Robyn E Furger, Michael A McCrea
OBJECTIVE: To determine the normative, baseline performance and psychometric properties of the Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (Child-SCAT3) in 5- to 13-year-old athletes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Practice fields. PARTICIPANTS: Contact sport athletes (N = 155) 5 to 13 years old. INDEPENDENT VARIABLES: Age, gender, verbal intellectual functioning (receptive vocabulary). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Child-SCAT3: self-reported and parent-reported symptoms, cognitive performance (child form of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion; SAC-C), and balance (modified Balance Error Scoring System, mBESS-C; tandem gait)...
July 15, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
David R Howell, Emily Hanson, Dai Sugimoto, Andrea Stracciolini, William P Meehan
OBJECTIVE: Postural stability is often affected by sport-related injuries and subsequently evaluated during postinjury examinations. Intrinsic factors, however, may also affect postural control. We sought to compare the postural control of female and male athletes as measured simultaneously by (1) the modified balance error scoring system (mBESS) and (2) a video-force plate system. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Sports injury prevention center...
July 15, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
Meghan Murphy, Brandon A McCutcheon, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Lorenzo Rinaldo, Daniel Levi Shepherd, Patrick R Maloney, Marcus J Gates, Mohamad Bydon
INTRODUCTION: Concussion diagnosis and management is a topic of interest for health care, education, and government professionals. Given the evidence concerning the association of long-term effects and cumulative insult of multiple concussions, we sought to identify risk factors in young athletes for repeat injury. METHODS: This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of our institution's series of pediatric sports related concussions. Patient demographics, characteristics, and clinical features of concussion were analyzed in an unadjusted fashion...
August 2016: Neurosurgery
Brian Ho, Eric W Edmonds, Henry G Chambers, Tracey P Bastrom, Andrew T Pennock
BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure is relatively common in young high-risk athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine a single center's 10-year experience with ACL reconstructions in pediatric and adolescent patients to better define short-term failure rates and risk factors for revision ACL surgery. METHODS: This institutional review board-approved retrospective study included all patients who underwent a primary ACL reconstruction between 2002 and 2013...
July 2, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics
Jennifer J Beck, Frances A Tepolt, Patricia E Miller, Lyle J Micheli, Mininder S Kocher
BACKGROUND: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a cause of leg pain in running athletes and is treated with fasciotomy after failure of nonoperative management. CECS is being seen with increased frequency in younger patients. The demographics and outcomes of fasciotomy for CECS in pediatric patients, including risk factors for treatment failure, have not been described. PURPOSE: To describe characteristics of pediatric patients with CECS and determine surgical outcomes of the condition in this population...
June 30, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
Sarah S Jackson, Dai Sugimoto, David R Howell, William P Meehan, Andrea Stracciolini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
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