Read by QxMD icon Read

Interprofessional simulation

Julie A Poore, Justine C Dawson, Dawne-Marie Dunbar, Kathryn Parrish
As the health care environment increases in complexity and patient acuity rises, health profession graduates need to be prepared to work collaboratively to improve patient outcomes. The interprofessional debriefing tool (Debriefing Interprofessionally: Recognition & Reflection) presented in this article allows any simulation to be transformed into an interprofessional learning opportunity. The debriefing tool frames questions for both uniprofessional and multiprofessional simulation and is aligned with the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and with Quality and Safety Education for Nurses...
March 14, 2018: Nurse Educator
Fereshteh Aein
BACKGROUND: Interprofessional learning is identified as one of the most innovative ways to encourage students of different disciplines to communicate with each other in interprofessional teams. A review of existing studies identified that inter-professional learning with nursing and midwifery students learning together had not previously been reported. AIM: This qualitative study sought to explore perceptions and experiences of midwifery students from interprofessional learning with nursing students...
March 8, 2018: Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives
Elisabeth van Gessel, Patricia Picchiottino, Robert Doureradjam, Mathieu Nendaz, Petra Mèche
AIMS: Demography of patients and complexity in the management of multimorbid conditions has made collaborative practice a necessity for the future, also in Switzerland. Since 2012, the University of Applied Sciences (UAS) and its Healthcare School as well as the University of Geneva (UG) with its Medical Faculty have joined forces to implement a training program in collaborative practice, using simulation as one of the main learning/teaching process. METHODS: The actual program consists of three sequential modules and totalizes 300 h of teaching and learning for approximately 1400-1500 students from six tracks (nutritionists, physiotherapists, midwives, nurses, technologists in medical radiology, physicians); in 2019 another hundred pharmacists will also be included...
March 8, 2018: Medical Teacher
Madison B Smith, Tamara G R Macieira, Michael D Bumbach, Susan J Garbutt, Sandra W Citty, Anita Stephen, Margaret Ansell, Toni L Glover, Gail Keenan
OBJECTIVES: To present the findings of a systematic review on the use of simulation-based learning experiences (SBLEs) to teach communication skills to nursing students and clinicians who provide palliative and end-of-life care to patients and their families. BACKGROUND: Palliative care communication skills are fundamental to providing holistic patient care. Since nurses have the greatest amount of direct exposure to patients, building such communication competencies is essential...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Alycia M Markowski, Kristin C Greenwood, Jessica L Parker, Marie B Corkery, Maria C Dolce
AIMS: Oral health is integral to overall health and wellness. All healthcare providers can contribute to improving health by including an oral health screening (OHS) in the physical examination. The aims of this study were to 1) develop and test a novel oral health curriculum and 2) compare the effectiveness of two distinct methods of instruction, a) simulation with physical therapists (PT) and dental professional co-debriefing and b) video observation with PT faculty- only instruction...
2018: Journal of Allied Health
Lori Fewster-Thuente, Tamzin J Batteson
It is imperative to incorporate education on interprofessional competencies into the curriculum of healthcare provider students in order to meet the individual program accreditation standards. However, what is missing is a theoretical foundation for the education. The purpose of this paper was to examine if the qualitative data from a mixed-methods study using low-fidelity simulation of a case study that demonstrated changes in interprofessional attitudes and behaviors in healthcare provider students aligned with Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory (ELT)...
2018: Journal of Allied Health
Joel Bierer, Eustatiu Memu, Robert Leeper, Dalilah Fortin, Eric Fréchette, Richard Inculet, Richard Malthaner
BACKGROUND: Our vision was to develop an inexpensive training simulation in a functional operating room (in-situ) that included surgical trainees, nursing and anesthesia staff to focus on effective interprofessional communication and teamwork skills. METHODS: The simulation scenario revolved around a post-pneumonectomy airway obstruction by residual tumor. This model included our thoracic operating room with patient status displayed by an open access vital sign simulator and a reversibly modified Laerdal® airway mannequin...
February 27, 2018: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Samantha W Gee, Philip L Holt, Michael J Stoner
INTRODUCTION: Critically ill children who require transfer to tertiary care centers often require transport by specialized transport teams (TT). These interfacility transports require a medical control physician (MCP). Traditionally this role is assigned to fellows who are taught "on-the-job", but achieving competency in communication for those trained this way may not be optimal. We sought to close this curriculum gap by developing a MCP training program immersing emergency medicine (EM) and critical care (CC) fellows together with TT members to manage a simulated patient...
March 2018: Air Medical Journal
Shobhana Nagraj, Juliet Harrison, Lawrence Hill, Lesley Bowker, Susanne Lindqvist
BACKGROUND: Collaborative practice between paramedics and medical staff is essential for ensuring the safe handover of patients. Handover of care is a critical time in the patient journey, when effective communication and collaborative practice are central to promoting patient safety and to avoiding medical error. To encourage effective collaboration between paramedic and medical students, an innovative, practice-based simulation exercise, known as interprofessional clinical skills (ICS) was developed at the University of East Anglia, UK...
February 23, 2018: Clinical Teacher
Tera Kirkman, Clarissa Hall, Rachel Winston, Vicki Pierce
Nursing students often care for one or two patients during hospital clinical experiences, while under the supervision of a nurse educator. In this setting, students have limited opportunities to make clinical judgments, prioritize, and delegate while caring for multiple patients. Research supports the need for students to have increased experiences in caring for multiple patients. The aim of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a multiple patient simulated clinical experience (SCE) on senior students' perception of their readiness to transition to practice...
February 6, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Kristin Curry Greenwood, Sara B Ewell
Background: The use of simulation-based education (SBE) in health professions, such as physical therapy, requires faculty to expand their teaching practice and development. The impact of this teaching on the individual faculty member, and how their teaching process changes or develops, is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to explore individual physical therapist faculty members' experience with SBE and how those experiences may have transformed their teaching practice to answer the research questions: How do physical therapist faculty develop through including SBE and are there commonalities among educators? Methods: An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used with a small sample of subjects who participated in three individual semi-structured interviews...
2018: Advances in Simulation
Michelle Lalonde, Marie-Christine Malouin-Benoit, Elizabeth Gagnon, Alain Michon, Monique Maisonneuve, Janie Desroches
BACKGROUND: the literature suggests that simulation is an effective strategy to meet the learning needs of nursing students. Traditionally, simulation learning for nursing students takes place at nursing schools ; at a distance from the clinical setting, patients, and the interprofessional team. AIM: the objective of this pilot project is to explore the experiences of Francophone nursing students following their participation in an interprofessional simulation in a hospital setting during their third year clinical placements...
February 2, 2018: Recherche en Soins Infirmiers
Sharon L Ruyak, Laura Migliaccio, Amy Levi, Sarah Patel
OBJECTIVE: simulation-based learning is increasingly seen as an effective strategy to develop student nurse-midwives into effective healthcare team members. A gap exists concerning the use of simulation to promote role transition/development of the student midwife. The purpose of this paper is to describe an evolving simulation curriculum aimed at role development of the student midwife as well as technical skills training. SETTING: the University of New Mexico, College of Nursing and the Interprofessional Healthcare Simulation Center...
February 2, 2018: Midwifery
Celeste M Alfes, Tonya Rutherford-Hemming, Casey M Schroeder-Jenkinson, Cynthia Booth Lord, Elizabeth Zimmermann
A 12-week program was developed to educate nursing, medicine, and physician assistant faculty on the principles and best practices of simulation. The goal was to facilitate team building and collaborative practice through the implementation of an interprofessional (IP) simulation experience for students. Workshops focused on IP communication involving seminar-based instruction, discussion, and the progressive development of an IP simulation based on a National League for Nursing Advancing Care Excellence for Seniors scenario...
February 7, 2018: Nursing Education Perspectives
Lucy Ann Kirkham
The use of interprofessional simulation training to enhance nursing students' performance of technical and non-technical clinical skills is becoming increasingly common. Simulation training can involve the use of role play, virtual reality or patient simulator manikins to replicate clinical scenarios and assess the nursing student's ability to, for example, undertake clinical observations or work as part of a team. Simulation training enables nursing students to practise clinical skills in a safe environment...
February 7, 2018: Nursing Standard
Jennifer N Carmack, Stephanie Kemery
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this literature review was to explore methodologies for teaching end-of-life (EOL) care to undergraduate nursing students. METHOD: Articles were retrieved by searching CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, and MEDLINE databases using the terms terminal care, palliative care, end of life care, undergraduate nurs*, hospice care, baccalaureate nurs*, prelicensure nurs*, palliative nurs*, training, and undergraduate education. A total of 728 articles were preliminarily evaluated for inclusion, with 22 relevant to this literature review...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Nursing Education
Dorothea Eisenmann, Fabian Stroben, Jan D Gerken, Aristomenis K Exadaktylos, Mareen Machner, Wolf E Hautz
Introduction: Preventable mistakes occur frequently and can lead to patient harm and death. The emergency department (ED) is notoriously prone to such errors, and evidence suggests that improving teamwork is a key aspect to reduce the rate of error in acute care settings. Only a few strategies are in place to train team skills and communication in interprofessional situations. Our goal was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a training module for students of three professions involved in emergency care...
January 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Leslie M Smith, Megan Keiser, Carman Turkelson, Amy M Yorke, Benjamin Sachs, Karen Berg
PURPOSE OF STUDY: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a simulation-enhanced interprofessional education (Sim-IPE) discharge planning learning experience using simulated patients (SPs), to explore the ability for students to communicate with each other and to a patient/caregiver, and to use clinical thinking to make a safe and appropriate interprofessional discharge recommendation. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTING(S): Educational institution; university simulation center...
March 2018: Professional Case Management
Michael Wagner, Ellen Heimberg, Lukas P Mileder, Alex Staffler, Annika Paulun, Ruth M Löllgen
INTRODUCTION: Simulation has acquired wide acceptance as an important component of education in health care and as a key tool to increase patient safety. This study aimed at identifying to what extent and how pediatric and neonatal simulation-based training (SBT) was being carried out in four Central European regions. METHODS: We surveyed all pediatric and neonatal health care institutions in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and South Tyrol on their current state of SBT using an online questionnaire...
January 30, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
Jennifer O'Rourke, Trisha Leann Horsley, Jessica Doolen, Bette Mariani, Christine Pariseault
AIM: The aim of this integrative review was to examine what is known about interprofessional (IP) simulation involving practicing nurses. BACKGROUND: The use of simulation within health care education and practice has rapidly expanded; however, there is a gap in what is known about the benefits of nurses engaging in IP simulation. METHOD: Five reviewers conducted a systematic literature search on studies of IP simulation among practicing nurses, published between January 1, 2010, and July 1, 2016...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"