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Secretion system

Zhilan Ye, Tao Zhang, Wenshan He, Honglin Jin, Cuiwei Liu, Zhe Yang, Jinghua Ren
Despite promising in-vitro evidence for effective glioblastoma treatment, most drugs are hindered from entering the central nervous system due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, successful modification of drug delivery and novel therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome this obstacle. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), cell-derived membrane-encapsulated structures with diameters ranging from 50-1000 nm, have been explored as drug delivery system to deliver their cargo to the brain tissue...
March 22, 2018: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Yingbo Liang, Shichun Cui, Xiaoli Tang, Yi Zhang, Dewen Qiu, Hongmei Zeng, Lihua Guo, Jingjing Yuan, Xiufen Yang
PevD1 is a fungal protein secreted by Verticillium dahliae . Our previous researches showed that this protein could induce hypersensitive responses-like necrosis and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in cotton and tobacco. To understand immune activation mechanisms whereby PevD1 elicits defense response, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay was performed to explore interacting protein of PevD1 in Arabidopsis thaliana , and a partner AtNRP (At5g42050) was identified. Here, AtNRP homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana was identified and designated as Nbnrp1...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Rosa Maria Paragliola, Roberto Salvatori
Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in acromegaly, but patients with persistent disease after surgery or in whom surgery cannot be considered require medical therapy. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) octreotide (OCT), lanreotide, and the more recently approved pasireotide, characterized by a broader receptor ligand binding profile, are considered the mainstay in the medical management of acromegaly. However, in the attempt to offer a more efficacious and better tolerated medical approach, recent research has been aimed to override some limitations related to the use of currently approved drugs and novel SRLs therapies, with potential attractive features, have been proposed...
2018: Frontiers in Endocrinology
Joseph d'Alessandro, Lauriane Mas, Laurence Aubry, Jean-Paul Rieu, Charlotte Rivière, Christophe Anjard
The capacity of living cells to sense their population density and to migrate accordingly is essential for the regulation of many physiological processes. However, the mechanisms used to achieve such functions are poorly known. Here, based on the analysis of multiple trajectories of vegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells, we investigate such a system extensively. We show that the cells secrete a high-molecular-weight quorum-sensing factor (QSF) in their medium. This extracellular signal induces, in turn, a reduction of the cell movements, in particular, through the downregulation of a mode of motility with high persistence time...
March 2018: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
Jianjia Fan, Rui Qi Zhao, Cameron Parro, Wenchen Zhao, Hsien-Ya Chou, Jerome Robert, Tarek Z Deeb, Carina Raynoschek, Samantha Barichievy, Ola Engvist, Marcello Maresca, Ryan Hicks, Johan Meuller, Stephen J Moss, Nicholas J Brandon, Michael W Wood, Iva Kulic, Cheryl L Wellington
Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the primary lipid carrier within the central nervous system (CNS) and the strongest genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE is primarily lipidated via the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and both are under transcriptional regulation by the liver X nuclear receptor (LXR). Considerable evidence from genetic (using ABCA1 overexpression) and pharmacological (using synthetic LXR agonists) studies in AD mouse models suggests that increased levels of lipidated apoE can improve cognitive performance and, in some strains, can reduce amyloid burden...
March 21, 2018: Journal of Lipid Research
Noa Sher, Racheli Ofir
The ephemeral placenta provides a noncontroversial source of young, healthy cells of both maternal and fetal origin from which cell therapy products can be manufactured. The 2 advantages of using live cells as therapeutic entities are: (a) in their environmental-responsive, multifactorial secretion profile and (b) in their activity as a "slow-release drug delivery system," releasing secretions over a long time frame. A major difficulty in translating cell therapy to the clinic involves challenges of large-scale, robust manufacturing while maintaining product characteristics, identity, and efficacy...
January 2018: Cell Transplantation
Anna Lange-Consiglio, Barbara Lazzari, Claudia Perrini, Flavia Pizzi, Alessandra Stella, Fausto Cremonesi, Emanuele Capra
Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are a recently discovered mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Our previous data show that MVs secreted by equine amniotic mesenchymal-derived cells (AMCs) are involved in downregulation of proinflammatory genes in lipopolysaccharide-stressed equine tendon and endometrial cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether AMC-MVs contain selected microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in inflammation. Two pools of cells, derived from 3 amniotic membranes each, and their respective MVs were collected...
January 2018: Cell Transplantation
Julian Clauß, Matthias Obenaus, Csaba Miskey, Zoltán Ivics, Zsuzsanna Izsvák, Wolfgang Uckert, Mario Bunse
Transposon-based vectors have entered clinical trials as an alternative to viral vectors for genetic engineering of T cells. However, transposon vectors require DNA transfection into T cells which we found to cause adverse effects. T cell viability was decreased in a dose-dependent manner and DNA-transfected T cells showed a delayed response upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation with regard to blast formation, proliferation and surface expression of CD25 and CD28. Gene expression analysis demonstrated a DNA-dependent induction of a type I interferon response and IFN-β upregulation...
March 21, 2018: Human Gene Therapy
Amandine Scandolera, Jane Hubert, Anne Humeau, Carole Lambert, Audrey De Bizemont, Chris Winkel, Abdelmajid Kaouas, Jean-Hugues Renault, Jean-Marc Nuzillard, Romain Reynaud
The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuro-soothing activity of a water-soluble hydrolysate obtained from the red microalgae Rhodosorus marinus Geitler (Stylonemataceae). Transcriptomic analysis performed on ≈100 genes related to skin biological functions firstly revealed that the crude Rhodosorus marinus extract was able to significantly negatively modulate specific genes involved in pro-inflammation (interleukin 1α encoding gene, IL1A) and pain detection related to tissue inflammation (nerve growth factor NGF and its receptor NGFR)...
March 17, 2018: Marine Drugs
Alain Lescoat, Alice Ballerie, Yu Augagneur, Claudie Morzadec, Laurent Vernhet, Olivier Fardel, Patrick Jégo, Stéphane Jouneau, Valérie Lecureur
Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases. However, alveolar macrophages (AM) are poorly available in humans to perform in vitro studies due to a limited access to broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). In this study, to identify the best alternative in vitro model for human AM, we compared the phenotype of AM obtained from BAL of patients suffering from three lung diseases (lung cancers, sarcoidosis and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated interstitial lung disease) to human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) differentiated with M-CSF or GM-CSF...
March 17, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Devram S Ghorpade, Lale Ozcan, Ze Zheng, Sarah M Nicoloro, Yuefei Shen, Emily Chen, Matthias Blüher, Michael P Czech, Ira Tabas
Obesity-induced metabolic disease involves functional integration among several organs via circulating factors, but little is known about crosstalk between liver and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). In obesity, VAT becomes populated with inflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). In obese humans, there is a close correlation between adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance, and in obese mice, blocking systemic or ATM inflammation improves insulin sensitivity. However, processes that promote pathological adipose tissue inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood...
March 21, 2018: Nature
Eliel Ruiz-May, Iben Sørensen, Zhangjun Fei, Sheng Zhang, David S Domozych, Jocelyn K C Rose
The secretome can be defined as the population of proteins that are secreted into the extracellular environment. Many proteins that are secreted by eukaryotes are N -glycosylated. However, there are striking differences in the diversity and conservation of N -glycosylation patterns between taxa. For example, the secretome and N -glycosylation structures differ between land plants and chlorophyte green algae, but it is not clear when this divergence took place during plant evolution. A potentially valuable system to study this issue is provided by the charophycean green algae (CGA), which is the immediate ancestors of land plants...
March 21, 2018: Proteomes
Luisana Di Cristo, Ciaran Manus Maguire, Karen Mc Quillan, Mattia Aleardi, Yuri Volkov, Dania Movia, Adriele Prina-Mello
Nanoparticles (NP)-based inhalation systems for drug delivery can be administered in liquid form, by nebulization or using pressurized metered dose inhalers, and in solid form by means of dry powder inhalers. However, NP delivery to the lungs has many challenges including the formulation instability due to particle-particle interactions and subsequent aggregation, causing poor deposition in the small distal airways and subsequent alveolar macrophages activity, which could lead to inflammation. This work aims at providing an in vitro experimental design for investigating the correlation between the physico-chemical properties of NP, and their biological behavior, when they are used as NP-based inhalation treatments, comparing two different exposure systems...
March 21, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Hongxia Lei, Frédéric Preitner, Gwenaël Labouèbe, Rolf Gruetter, Bernard Thorens
Glucose transporter 2 ( Glut2)-positive cells are sparsely distributed in brain and play an important role in the stimulation of glucagon secretion in response to hypoglycemia. We aimed to determine if Glut2-positive cells can influence another response to hypoglycemia, i.e. increased cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF of adult male mice devoid of Glut2, either globally ( ripglut1:glut2- / - ) or in the nervous system only (NG2KO), and their respective controls were studied under basal glycemia and insulin-induced hypoglycemia using quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging at 9...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Zhao-Xia Cao, An-Guo Liu, Tian-Tian Zhu, Xiao-Juan Li, Yu-Ting Wei, Xing-Ke Yan
Acupuncture has been found effective for the treatment of amblyopia, and its mechanism has been investigated. A review of recently published research results indicated that when used to treat amblyopia, acupuncture induced changes in the action of neurotransmitters in the visual system, promoted the secretion and synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and stimulated the expression of genes related to visual plasticity.
March 25, 2018: Zhen Ci Yan Jiu, Acupuncture Research
Boworn Soonthornsumrith, Jirawat Saetan, Thanapong Kruangkum, Tipsuda Thongbuakaew, Thanyaporn Senarai, Ronnarong Palasoon, Prasert Sobhon, Prapee Sretarugsa
The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is an economically important crustacean species which has also been extensively used as a model in neuroscience research. The crustacean central nervous system is a highly complex structure, especially the brain. However, little information is available on the brain structure, especially the three-dimensional organization. In this study, we demonstrated the three-dimensional structure and histology of the brain of M. rosenbergii together with the distribution of serotonin (5-HT) in the brain and ovary as well as its effects on ovarian steroidogenesis...
March 20, 2018: Invertebrate Neuroscience: IN
Steven A Signs, Robert C Fisher, Uyen Tran, Susmita Chakrabarti, Samaneh K Sarvestani, Shao Xiang, David Liska, Veronique Roche, Wei Lai, Haley R Gittleman, Oliver Wessely, Emina H Huang
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects one million people in the US. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a subtype of IBD that can lead to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). In UC, the rate of CAC is 3-5-fold greater than the rate of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The pathogenesis of UC and CAC are due to aberrant interactions between host immune system and microenvironment, but precise mechanisms are still unknown. In colitis and CAC, microenvironmental fibroblasts exhibit an activated, inflammatory phenotype that contributes to tumorigenesis accompanied by excessive secretion of the chemokine CXCL8...
February 27, 2018: Oncotarget
Cynthia Louis, Chris Burns, Ian Wicks
The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is driven by genetic predisposition and environmental triggers that lead to dysregulated immune responses. These include the generation of pathogenic autoantibodies and aberrant production of inflammatory cytokines. Current therapies for RA and other autoimmune diseases reduce inflammation by targeting inflammatory mediators, most of which are innate response cytokines, resulting in generalized immunosuppression...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Noha M Elhosseiny, Ahmed S Attia
Acinetobacter baumannii is a notorious pathogen that has emerged as a healthcare nightmare in recent years because it causes serious infections that are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Due to its exceptional ability to acquire resistance to almost all available antibiotics, A. baumannii is currently ranked as the first pathogen on the World Health Organization's priority list for the development of new antibiotics. The versatile range of effectors secreted by A. baumannii represents a large proportion of the virulence arsenal identified in this bacterium to date...
March 21, 2018: Emerging Microbes & Infections
Maarten G K Ghequire, Toon Swings, Jan Michiels, Susan K Buchanan, René De Mot
Lectin-like bacteriocins (LlpAs) are secreted by proteobacteria and selectively kill strains of their own or related species, and they are composed of two B-lectin domains with divergent sequences. In Pseudomonas spp., initial binding of these antibacterial proteins to cells is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain through d-rhamnose residues present in the common polysaccharide antigen of their lipopolysaccharide, whereas the amino-terminal domain accounts for strain selectivity of killing. Here, we show that spontaneous LlpA-resistant mutants carry mutations in one of three surface-exposed moieties of the essential β-barrel outer membrane protein insertase BamA, the core component of the BAM complex...
March 20, 2018: MBio
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