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Adnan Ansar, Ahmed Ehsanur Rahman, Lorena Romero, Mohammad Rifat Haider, Mohammad Masudur Rahman, Md Moinuddin, Md Abu Bakkar Siddique, Md Al Mamun, Tapas Mazumder, Shafique Pyarali Pirani, Richard Gordon Mathias, Shams Ei Arifeen, Dewan Md Emdadul Hoque
INTRODUCTION: Clubfoot is a common congenital birth defect, with an average prevalence of approximately 1 per 1000 live births, although this rate is reported to vary among different countries around the world. If it remains untreated, clubfoot causes permanent disability, limits educational and employment opportunities, and personal growth. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to estimate the global birth prevalence of congenital clubfoot. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, Global Health, Latin American & Caribben Health Science Literature (LILACS), Maternity and Infant Care, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar will be searched for observational studies based on predefined criteria and only in English language from inception of database in 1946 to 10 November 2017...
March 6, 2018: BMJ Open
Sarah Drew, Rachael Gooberman-Hill, Christopher Lavy
BACKGROUND: Around 100,000 children are born annually with clubfoot worldwide and 80% live in low and middle-income counties (LMICs). Clubfoot is a condition in which children are born with one or both feet twisted inwards and if untreated it can limit participation in everyday life. Clubfoot can be corrected through staged manipulation of the limbs using the Ponseti method. Despite its efficacy and apparent availability, previous research has identified a number of challenges to service implementation...
March 2, 2018: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Katarina Andjelkov, Ramon Llull, Milan Colic, Tatjana C Atanasijevic, Vesna M Popovic, Miodrag Colic
Background: Even when clubfoot deformity is treated in a timely manner, the consequences observed in adulthood include hypoplasia of the calf muscles, gait impairment, decreases in foot size and can also affect the tibial length. These consequences may have negative impacts on the patient's subjective appraisal of long-term outcomes, and can influence the patient's self-esteem in both male and female patients. Objectives: We present our experience in the treatment of undeveloped calves after surgical treatment of congenital clubfoot...
February 21, 2018: Aesthetic Surgery Journal
Rattan L Mittal
AIM/PURPOSE: Extreme congenital club foot deformities are common in developing countries, presenting at birth, persisting in children, adolescents and adults; as untreated/under-corrected by conservative and/or surgical means. Scores of confusing names exist in literature for such deformities with no good treatment available; mostly advocating unacceptable arthrodesis. The author researched this grey area for more than 40 years and successfully innovated improved surgical corrections, more acceptable to patients...
February 17, 2018: International Orthopaedics
Jiří Jochymek, Jakub Turek
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the role of sonographic evaluation of Talar dysplasia in predicting the outcome of standard Ponseti method in the treatment of clubfoot deformity. METHODS: A total 23 children (15 boys and 8 girls; mean age: 18.2 ± 5.4 days (8-32)) who underwent Ponseti treatment were included in the study. Before the treatment, maximal talus length of affected and non-affected feet were measured by US and relative talar dysplasia ratio (RTDR) was calculated...
February 13, 2018: Acta Orthopaedica et Traumatologica Turcica
Michael Seungcheol Kang, Il-Yeong Hwang, Soo-Sung Park
BACKGROUND: Selective soft tissue release (SSTR), which includes a combination of abductor hallucis, tibialis posterior, and Achilles lengthening, has been used in patients with recurrent clubfoot deformity after Ponseti treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic factors for recurrence of clubfoot deformity after SSTR. METHODS: Consecutive patients with idiopathic clubfoot and residual or recurrent deformity after Ponseti treatment underwent SSTR between 2005 and 2013...
February 1, 2018: Foot & Ankle International
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 8, 2018: Development
J Martin Collinson, Nils O Lindström, Carlos Neves, Karen Wallace, Caroline Meharg, Rebecca H Charles, Zoe K Ross, Amy M Fraser, Ivan Mbogo, Kadri Oras, Masaru Nakamoto, Simon Barker, Suzanne Duce, Zosia Miedzybrodzka, Neil Vargesson
Genetic factors underlying the human limb abnormality congenital talipes equinovarus ('clubfoot') remain incompletely understood. The spontaneous autosomal recessive mouse 'peroneal muscular atrophy' mutant (PMA) is a faithful morphological model of human clubfoot. In PMA mice, the dorsal (peroneal) branches of the sciatic nerves are absent. In this study, the primary developmental defect was identified as a reduced growth of sciatic nerve lateral motor column (LMC) neurons leading to failure to project to dorsal (peroneal) lower limb muscle blocks...
February 8, 2018: Development
Kenichi Mishima, Hiroshi Kitoh, Masaki Matsushita, Hiroshi Sugiura, Sachi Hasegawa, Akiko Kitamura, Yoshihiro Nishida, Naoki Ishiguro
BACKGROUND: This study aimed at identifying early risk factors for rigid relapse in idiopathic clubfoot using foot radiographs. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with 43 idiopathic clubfeet treated with the Ponseti method were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: There were seven rigid relapse recalcitrant to manipulation and requiring extensive soft-tissue release. Three radiograabphic measurements on the maximum dorsiflexion lateral (MD-Lat) radiograph, talocalcaneal (TaloCalc-Lat), tibiocalcaneal (TibCalc-Lat), and calcaneus-first metatarsal (CalcMT1-Lat) angles, showed significant differences between patients with and without rigid relapse...
June 17, 2017: Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Journal of the European Society of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Shai Shrot, Clark T Johnson, W Christopher Golden, Ahmet A Baschat, Janine E Bullard, Aylin Tekes, Andrea Poretti, Emily Dunn, Thierry A G M Huisman
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Persistent hyperextension of the fetal craniocervical junction or neck is one of several fetal positions commonly observed on prenatal imaging. Underlying fetal structural etiologies such as fetal neck masses and iniencephaly can be detected as causes of hyperextension. Caesarean delivery is considered in cases of vaginal delivery or obstructed labor for fear of cervical spinal cord injury. In this case series, we describe the prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and their potential role in obstetric management and discuss postnatal outcomes in fetuses demonstrating prenatal imaging findings of persistent extreme hyperextension of the neck...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Neuroimaging: Official Journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging
S R Wijayasinghe, W Y M Abeysekera, T S S Dharmaratne
A retrospective descriptive study was conducted, based on database of Sri Lanka Clubfoot Program, under theInternational Clubfoot Registry. Patients with Clubfoot deformity treated at Orthopaedic unit of Lady Ridgeway Children's Hospital (LRCH), Sri Lanka were evaluated from June 2012 to March 2015. There were a total of 354 patients with male: female ratio of 2.7:1. Bilateral deformity was detected in 48% (171) with positive family history in 14% (49). Majority was hospital births (95%) and 14% were preterm deliveries-pregnancy, and birth-related complications were found in 28...
February 2018: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
E von Stillfried
Most deformities of the foot are visible at birth and can be diagnosed without imaging. They can be divided into congenital flexible, congenital structural and acquired foot deformities. The most common congenital flexible foot deformity in children is the metatarsus adductus, which usually requires no long-term therapy. Regarding congenital structural deformities, such as the clubfoot and talus verticalis, plaster therapy should be started during the first week of life, so that by the end of the first year of life and the beginning of the verticalization, a pain-free resilient foot with normal function is present...
January 17, 2018: Der Radiologe
Michael Hadjiargyrou
The Mustn1 gene encodes a small nuclear protein (~9.6 kDa) that does not belong to any known family. Its genomic organization consists of three exons interspersed by two introns and it is highly homologous across vertebrate species. Promoter analyses revealed that its expression is regulated by the AP family of transcription factors, especially c-Fos, Fra-2 and JunD. Mustn1 is predominantly expressed in the major tissues of the musculoskeletal system: bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle and tendon. Its expression has been associated with normal embryonic development, postnatal growth, exercise, and regeneration of bone and skeletal muscle...
January 12, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Jennifer McCahill, Julie Stebbins, Bart Koning, Jaap Harlaar, Tim Theologis
INTRODUCTION: The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in pathological conditions. The aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of the OFM in children with foot deformity. METHODS: Intra-tester repeatability was assessed for 45 children (15 typically developing, 15 hemiplegic, 15 clubfoot)...
December 26, 2017: Gait & Posture
Lucie Gueneau, Richard J Fish, Hanan E Shamseldin, Norine Voisin, Frédéric Tran Mau-Them, Egle Preiksaitiene, Glen R Monroe, Angeline Lai, Audrey Putoux, Fabienne Allias, Qamariya Ambusaidi, Laima Ambrozaityte, Loreta Cimbalistienė, Julien Delafontaine, Nicolas Guex, Mais Hashem, Wesam Kurdi, Saumya Shekhar Jamuar, Lim J Ying, Carine Bonnard, Tommaso Pippucci, Sylvain Pradervand, Bernd Roechert, Peter M van Hasselt, Michaël Wiederkehr, Caroline F Wright, Ioannis Xenarios, Gijs van Haaften, Charles Shaw-Smith, Erica M Schindewolf, Marguerite Neerman-Arbez, Damien Sanlaville, Gaëtan Lesca, Laurent Guibaud, Bruno Reversade, Jamel Chelly, Vaidutis Kučinskas, Fowzan S Alkuraya, Alexandre Reymond
Whole-exome and targeted sequencing of 13 individuals from 10 unrelated families with overlapping clinical manifestations identified loss-of-function and missense variants in KIAA1109 allowing delineation of an autosomal-recessive multi-system syndrome, which we suggest to name Alkuraya-Kučinskas syndrome (MIM 617822). Shared phenotypic features representing the cardinal characteristics of this syndrome combine brain atrophy with clubfoot and arthrogryposis. Affected individuals present with cerebral parenchymal underdevelopment, ranging from major cerebral parenchymal thinning with lissencephalic aspect to moderate parenchymal rarefaction, severe to mild ventriculomegaly, cerebellar hypoplasia with brainstem dysgenesis, and cardiac and ophthalmologic anomalies, such as microphthalmia and cataract...
December 27, 2017: American Journal of Human Genetics
Jean-Sébastien Bourseul, Anais Molina, Mael Lintanf, Laetitia Houx, Emmanuelle Chaléat-Valayer, Christelle Pons, Sylvain Brochard
OBJECTIVE: To report current evidence regarding the safety of intramuscular BTI in children with orthopaedic- and neurological-related musculoskeletal disorders under the age of 2 years. DATA SOURCE: PUBMED, The Cochrane Library, and Science Direct, Google Scholar and Web of Science. STUDY SELECTION: Two reviewers independently selected studies based on predetermined inclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION: Data relating to the aim were extracted...
December 26, 2017: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Kanwaljit S Khas, Pulak M Pandey, Alok R Ray
BACKGROUND: Clubfoot is a three-dimensional deformity of the foot in which the foot is twisted in three mutually perpendicular planes from the normal shape of the foot. Of the various treatment methods that are available to manage clubfoot, non-operative approaches are preferred. The conventional non-operative method of treatment is to apply a series of casts to the infant's clubfoot to gradually manipulate its position. However, prolonged use of casts can result in skin rash, skin dehydration and ulcers on the soft skin of an infant...
December 6, 2017: Clinical Biomechanics
Xiao-Jian Wang, Feng Chang, Yun-Xing Su, Xiao-Chun Wei, Lei Wei
Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using the Ilizarov invasive distraction technique combined with limited surgical operations in the treatment of relapsed talipes equinovarus in children. Methods This retrospective study analysed the outcomes of paediatric patients with relapsed talipes equinovarus who were treated with the Ilizarov technique with moderate open limited soft tissue or bony operations. The International Clubfoot Study Group (ICFSG) classification system score was used to evaluate the deformities before and after surgery...
February 2018: Journal of International Medical Research
J G Ríos-Ruiz, D M González-Torres, L A Valdez-Jiménez
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the healing time of Achilles tendon in pediatric patients treated with Achilles tenotomy with the Ponseti method in Shriners Childrens Hospital of Mexico, AC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experimental, analytical, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic congenital clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method with serial static and dynamic evaluation by ultrasound in real time with a Siemens Diagnostic Ultrasound System Sonoline 650, linear transducer 10...
May 2017: Acta Ortopédica Mexicana
J J Guerra-Jasso, J A Valcarce-León, H M Quíntela-Núñez-Del Prado
BACKGROUND: Adduct congenital talipes equinovarus (CTE) or clubfoot is a common musculoskeletal malformation affecting between 1 and 4.5 out of every 1000 live births. It is usually associated with arthrogryposis and Moebius syndrome with the latter two being more difficult to treat as they require aggressive surgery to achieve a plantigrade foot. We therefore ask what is the evidence level and grade of recommendation of the Ponseti method to treat syndromic talipes equinovarus resulting from arthrogryposis and Moebius syndrome...
July 2017: Acta Ortopédica Mexicana
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