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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29782533/shared-responsibility-for-managing-fatigue-hearing-the-pilots
#1
Jennifer L Zaslona, Karyn M O'Keeffe, T Leigh Signal, Philippa H Gander
In commercial aviation, fatigue is defined as a physiological state of reduced mental or physical performance capability resulting from sleep loss, extended wakefulness, circadian phase, and/or workload. The International Civil Aviation Organisation mandates that responsibility for fatigue risk management is shared between airline management, pilots, and support staff. However, to date, the majority of research relating to fatigue mitigations in long range operations has focused on the mitigations required or recommended by regulators and operators...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771813/exploring-validation-and-verification-how-they-different-and-what-they-mean-to-healthcare-simulation
#2
John Jacob Barnes, Mojca Remskar Konia
The healthcare simulation (HCS) community recognizes the importance of quality management because many novel simulation devices and techniques include some sort of description of how they tested and assured their simulation's quality. Verification and validation play a key role in quality management; however, literature published on HCS has many different interpretations of what these terms mean and how to accomplish them. The varied use of these terms leads to varied interpretations of how verification process is different from validation process...
May 15, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29759259/1-300-days-and-counting-a-risk-model-approach-to-preventing-retained-foreign-objects-rfos
#3
Erika G Duggan, Jimmy Fernandez, Mary May Saulan, Dave L Mayers, Mira Nikolaj, Tamara M Strah, Lystra M Swift, Larissa Temple
BACKGROUND: A retained foreign object (RFO) is a devastating surgical complication that typically results in additional surgeries, increased length of stay, and risk of infections and is potentially fatal. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) convened a multidisciplinary task force to undertake an improvement initiative to reduce the frequency of RFO incidents. METHODS: A needs assessment was undertaken using focus group interviews, review of past RFOs, and operating room (OR) observations, and a comprehensive intervention plan was initiated...
May 2018: Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757710/what-went-right-an-analysis-of-the-protective-factors-in-aviation-near-misses
#4
Brian Thoroman, Natassia Goode, Paul Salmon, Matthew Wooley
Learning from successful safety outcomes, or what went right, is an important emerging component of maintaining safe systems. Accordingly, there are increasing calls to study normal performance in near misses as part of safety management activities. Despite this, there is limited guidance on how to accomplish this in practice. This article presents a study in which using Rasmussen's risk management framework to analyse sixteen serious incidents from the aviation domain. The findings show that a network of protective factors prevents accidents with factors identified across the sociotechnical system...
May 14, 2018: Ergonomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29754203/prospective-analysis-of-decision-making-during-joint-cardiology-cardiothoracic-conference-in-treatment-of-107-consecutive-children-with-congenital-heart-disease
#5
Sophie Duignan, Aedin Ryan, Dara O'Keeffe, Damien Kenny, Colin J McMahon
The complexity and potential biases involved in decision making have long been recognised and examined in both the aviation and business industries. More recently, the medical community have started to explore this concept and its particular importance in our field. Paediatric cardiology is a rapidly expanding field and for many of the conditions we treat, there is limited evidence available to support our decision-making. Variability exists within decision-making in paediatric cardiology and this may influence outcomes...
May 12, 2018: Pediatric Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753288/toxicity-of-carbon-nanomaterials-to-plants-animals-and-microbes-recent-progress-from-2015-present
#6
REVIEW
Ming Chen, Shuang Zhou, Yi Zhu, Yingzhu Sun, Guangming Zeng, Chunping Yang, Piao Xu, Ming Yan, Zhifeng Liu, Wei Zhang
Nanotechnology has gained significant development over the past decades, which led to the revolution in the fields of information, medicine, industry, food security and aerospace aviation. Nanotechnology has become a new research hot spot in the world. However, we cannot only pay attention to its benefit to the society and economy, because its wide use has been bringing potential environmental and health effects that should be noticed. This paper reviews the recent progress from 2015-present in the toxicity of various carbon nanomaterials to plants, animals and microbes, and lays the foundation for further study on the environmental and ecological risks of carbon nanomaterials...
May 4, 2018: Chemosphere
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29743777/implication-of-emotional-labor-cognitive-flexibility-and-relational-energy-among-cabin-crew-a-review
#7
REVIEW
Rithi Baruah, K Jayasankara Reddy
The primary aim of the civil aviation industry is to provide a secured and comfortable service to their customers and clients. This review concentrates on the cabin crew members, who are the frontline employees of the aviation industry and are salaried to smile. The objective of this review article is to analyze the variables of emotional labor, cognitive flexibility, and relational energy using the biopsychosocial model and identify organizational implications among cabin crew. Online databases such as EBSCOhost, JSTOR, Springerlink, and PubMed were used to gather articles for the review...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29734496/impacts-of-biomass-production-at-civil-airports-on-grassland-bird-conservation-and-aviation-strike-risk
#8
Tara J Conkling, Jerrold L Belant, Travis L DeVault, James A Martin
Growing concerns about climate change, foreign oil dependency, and environmental quality have fostered interest in perennial native grasses (e.g., switchgrass [Panicum virgatum]) for bioenergy production while also maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, biomass cultivation in marginal landscapes such as airport grasslands may have detrimental effects on aviation safety as well as conservation efforts for grassland birds. In 2011-2013, we investigated effects of vegetation composition and harvest frequency on seasonal species richness and habitat use of grassland birds and modeled relative abundance, aviation risk, and conservation value of birds associated with biomass crops...
March 8, 2018: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29732110/tinker-hp-a-massively-parallel-molecular-dynamics-package-for-multiscale-simulations-of-large-complex-systems-with-advanced-point-dipole-polarizable-force-fields
#9
Louis Lagardère, Luc-Henri Jolly, Filippo Lipparini, Félix Aviat, Benjamin Stamm, Zhifeng F Jing, Matthew Harger, Hedieh Torabifard, G Andrés Cisneros, Michael J Schnieders, Nohad Gresh, Yvon Maday, Pengyu Y Ren, Jay W Ponder, Jean-Philip Piquemal
We present Tinker-HP, a massively MPI parallel package dedicated to classical molecular dynamics (MD) and to multiscale simulations, using advanced polarizable force fields (PFF) encompassing distributed multipoles electrostatics. Tinker-HP is an evolution of the popular Tinker package code that conserves its simplicity of use and its reference double precision implementation for CPUs. Grounded on interdisciplinary efforts with applied mathematics, Tinker-HP allows for long polarizable MD simulations on large systems up to millions of atoms...
January 28, 2018: Chemical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29731496/aeromedical-transport-operations-using-helicopters-during-the-2016-kumamoto-earthquake-in-japan
#10
Tomokazu Motomura, Atsushi Hirabayashi, Hisashi Matsumoto, Nobutaka Yamauchi, Mitsunobu Nakamura, Hiroshi Machida, Kenji Fujizuka, Naomi Otsuka, Tomoko Satoh, Hideaki Anan, Hisayoshi Kondo, Yuichi Koido
More than 6,000 people died in the Great Hanshin (Kobe) Earthquake in 1995, and it was later reported that there were around 500 preventable trauma deaths. In response, the Japanese government developed the helicopter emergency medical service in 2001, known in Japan as the "Doctor-Heli" (DH), which had 46 DHs and 2 private medical helicopters as of April 2016. DHs transport physicians and nurses to provide pre-hospital medical care at the scene of medical emergencies. Following lessons learned in the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, a research group in the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare developed a command and control system for the DH fleet as well as the Disaster Relief Aircraft Management System Network (D-NET), which uses a satellite communications network to monitor the location of the fleet and weather in real-time during disasters...
2018: Journal of Nippon Medical School, Nippon Ika Daigaku Zasshi
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29730774/in-flight-cardiac-arrest-and-in-flight-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-during-commercial-air-travel-consensus-statement-and-supplementary-treatment-guideline-from-the-german-society-of-aerospace-medicine-dglrm
#11
Jochen Hinkelbein, Lennert Böhm, Stefan Braunecker, Harald V Genzwürker, Steffen Kalina, Fabrizio Cirillo, Matthieu Komorowski, Andreas Hohn, Jörg Siedenburg, Michael Bernhard, Ilse Janicke, Christoph Adler, Stefanie Jansen, Eckard Glaser, Pawel Krawczyk, Mirko Miesen, Janusz Andres, Edoardo De Robertis, Christopher Neuhaus
By the end of the year 2016, approximately 3 billion people worldwide travelled by commercial air transport. Between 1 out of 14,000 and 1 out of 50,000 passengers will experience acute medical problems/emergencies during a flight (i.e., in-flight medical emergency). Cardiac arrest accounts for 0.3% of all in-flight medical emergencies. So far, no specific guideline exists for the management and treatment of in-flight cardiac arrest (IFCA). A task force with clinical and investigational expertise in aviation, aviation medicine, and emergency medicine was created to develop a consensus based on scientific evidence and compiled a guideline for the management and treatment of in-flight cardiac arrests...
May 5, 2018: Internal and Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29698102/understanding-human-error-in-naval-aviation-mishaps
#12
Andrew T Miranda
OBJECTIVE: To better understand the external factors that influence the performance and decisions of aviators involved in Naval aviation mishaps. BACKGROUND: Mishaps in complex activities, ranging from aviation to nuclear power operations, are often the result of interactions between multiple components within an organization. The Naval aviation mishap database contains relevant information, both in quantitative statistics and qualitative reports, that permits analysis of such interactions to identify how the working atmosphere influences aviator performance and judgment...
April 1, 2018: Human Factors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29677160/an-empirical-study-of-the-impact-of-the-air-transportation-industry-energy-conservation-and-emission-reduction-projects-on-the-local-economy-in-china
#13
Yuxiu Chen, Jian Yu, Li Li, Linlin Li, Long Li, Jie Zhou, Sang-Bing Tsai, Quan Chen
Green development has been of particular interest to a range of industries worldwide, one of which being the air transportation industry (ATI). The energy conservation and emission reduction (ECER) projects of the ATI have a huge impact on the local economy. In this study, the input-output method was used to analyze the indirect economic impact of the implementation of the ECER projects of the ATI on the local economy of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. We examined the direct benefits, backward spread effects, forward spread effects, and consumption multiplier effects...
April 20, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29674296/what-interventionalists-can-learn-from-the-aviation-industry
#14
Robert A Byrne
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 20, 2018: EuroIntervention
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673436/two-aviation-accident-investigation-questionnaires-for-passenger-and-crew-survival-factors-and-injuries
#15
Jan M Davies, W Angus Wallace, Christopher L Colton, Kyung In Yoo, Martin Maurino
BACKGROUND: Review of injuries resulting from aircraft accidents and analysis of their mechanisms have proved helpful in generating and implementing survival-related improvements. Ideally, such information should be correlated with seat belt type and use, as well as any brace position adopted. This information should be recorded and made publicly available to future researchers. METHODS: Members of IBRACE have developed two questionnaires to assist accident / cabin-safety investigators to record this information in an integrated consistent manner...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673435/decompression-sickness-in-the-f-a-18c-after-atypical-cabin-pressure-fluctuations
#16
Katherine J Lee, Aliye Z Sanou
BACKGROUND: The spectrum of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) is evolving as more cases of atypical pressure fluctuations occur. This ongoing change makes it a difficult condition to diagnose and even more difficult to identify. Both Flight Surgeons and Undersea Medical Officers (UMOs) must keep DCS on the differential. These two cases describe altitude DCS after unique pressure patterns, with one at a markedly lower than expected altitude for DCS. CASE REPORT: Both cases occurred in the F/A-18C and resulted in DCS requiring hyperbaric chamber treatment...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673434/diphyllobothriasis-in-a-u-s-military-aviator
#17
Stephen D Kasteler
BACKGROUND: Diphyllobothriasis is estimated to afflict 10-20 million people worldwide; however, this is the first case reported in a United States military aviator. Among the largest parasites of humans, the "fish tapeworm" grows from 2-15 m in length, can live >20 yr in the intestines, and is contracted through consumption of uncooked, unfrozen freshwater or anadromous fish species. CASE REPORT: A 32-yr-old male F-22 pilot presented with mild stomach cramping, bloating, nausea, and intermittent loose stools...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673432/a-survey-of-fatigue-in-army-aviators
#18
Amanda M Kelley, Kathryn A Feltman, Ian P Curry
INTRODUCTION: Fatigue plays a critical role in mission success due to its effect on a number of performance variables. The purpose of this study was to gauge the extent to which U.S. Army aviators experience subjective fatigue on a regular basis presently as well as their perceptions of their own sleep quality, quantity, and daytime sleepiness. This information is valuable for prioritizing future research lines with respect to injury prevention and fatigue management as well as updating policy...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673431/the-aeromedical-management-of-allergic-rhinitis
#19
Nicole Powell-Dunford, Charles Reese, Alaistair Bushby, Berit H Munkeby, Sébastien Coste, Višnja Livajić Pezer, Lars Rosenkvist
INTRODUCTION: Allergic rhinitis is a prevalent condition warranting special aeromedical consideration due to its potential for acute and painful manifestations involving the middle ear or paranasal sinuses during rapid barometric pressure changes. Although second generation antihistamines and intranasal steroids are safe and effective treatments for this common condition, aeromedical management varies. METHODS: An aeromedical policy review of 14 public access civil and military data repositories was undertaken...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673429/lumbar-disc-herniation-in-military-helicopter-pilots-vs-matched-controls
#20
Jeffrey B Knox, J Banks Deal, Jennifer A Knox
INTRODUCTION: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common injury among active duty service members resulting in missed duty hours and limited duty status. Little is known about the current burden of disease and risk factors for LDH among military rotary wing aviators. METHODS: A query was made using the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED), including patient encounters for the U.S. Military from 2006-2015 using the ICD-9 code for LDH. Incidence rates were calculated for patients with the occupation of helicopter pilot and stratified by age, gender, and branch of service, then compared to matched controls using a Poisson regression analysis...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
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