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Evolutionary psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088057/a-systematic-review-of-adult-attachment-and-social-anxiety
#1
REVIEW
Ray P C Manning, Joanne M Dickson, Jasper Palmier-Claus, Alexandra Cunliffe, Peter J Taylor
BACKGROUND: Attachment has been implicated in the development of social anxiety. Our aim was to synthesise the extant literature exploring the role of adult attachment in these disorders. METHOD: Search terms relating to social anxiety and attachment were entered into MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed using and adapted version of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality assessment tool. Eligible studies employed validated social anxiety and attachment assessments in adult clinical and analogue samples...
December 19, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065215/a-comparative-and-evolutionary-analysis-of-the-cultural-cognition-of-humans-and-other-apes
#2
Andrew Whiten
The comparative and evolutionary analysis of social learning and all manner of cultural processes has become a flourishing field. Applying the 'comparative method' to such phenomena allows us to exploit the good fortunate we have in being able to study them in satisfying detail in our living primate relatives, using the results to reconstruct the cultural cognition of the ancestral forms we share with these species. Here I offer an overview of principal discoveries in recent years, organized through a developing scheme that targets three main dimensions of culture: the patterning of culturally transmitted traditions in time and space; the underlying social learning processes; and the particular behavioral and psychological contents of cultures...
January 9, 2017: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065201/the-foundations-of-human-cooperation-in-teaching-and-imitation
#3
Kevin N Laland
Humans exhibit extensive large-scale cooperation, of a form unprecedented in the natural world. Here I suggest that this cooperation arises in our species alone because of our uniquely potent capacities for social learning, imitation and teaching, combined with the co-evolutionary feedbacks that these capabilities have generated on the human mind. Culture took human populations down evolutionary pathways not available to non-cultural species, either by creating conditions that promoted established cooperative mechanisms, such as indirect reciprocity and mutualism, or by generating novel cooperative mechanisms not seen in other taxa, such as cultural group selection...
January 9, 2017: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065192/cognition-and-culture-in-evolutionary-context
#4
Fernando Colmenares, María Victoria Hernández-Lloreda
In humans and other animals, the individuals' ability to adapt efficiently and effectively to the niches they have actively contributed to construct relies heavily on an evolved psychology which has been shaped by biological, social, and cultural processes over evolutionary time. As expected, although many of the behavioral and cognitive components of this evolved psychology are widely shared across species, many others are species-unique. Although many animal species are known to acquire group-specific traditions (or cultures) via social learning, human culture is unique in terms of its contents and characteristics (observable and unobservable products, cumulative effects, norm conformity, and norm enforcement) and of its cognitive underpinnings (imitation, instructed teaching, and language)...
January 9, 2017: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28059766/cognition-mediated-evolution-of-low-quality-floral-nectars
#5
Vladislav Nachev, Kai Petra Stich, Clemens Winter, Alan Bond, Alan Kamil, York Winter
Plants pollinated by hummingbirds or bats produce dilute nectars even though these animals prefer more concentrated sugar solutions. This mismatch is an unsolved evolutionary paradox. Here we show that lower quality, or more dilute, nectars evolve when the strength of preferring larger quantities or higher qualities of nectar diminishes as magnitudes of the physical stimuli increase. In a virtual evolution experiment conducted in the tropical rainforest, bats visited computer-automated flowers with simulated genomes that evolved relatively dilute nectars...
January 6, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052103/bmi-and-whr-are-reflected-in-female-facial-shape-and-texture-a-geometric-morphometric-image-analysis
#6
Christine Mayer, Sonja Windhager, Katrin Schaefer, Philipp Mitteroecker
Facial markers of body composition are frequently studied in evolutionary psychology and are important in computational and forensic face recognition. We assessed the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with facial shape and texture (color pattern) in a sample of young Middle European women by a combination of geometric morphometrics and image analysis. Faces of women with high BMI had a wider and rounder facial outline relative to the size of the eyes and lips, and relatively lower eyebrows...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051932/social-learning-and-culture-in-child-and-chimpanzee
#7
Andrew Whiten
A few decades ago, we knew next to nothing about the behavior of our closest animal relative, the chimpanzee, but long-term field studies have since revealed an undreamed-of richness in the diversity of their cultural traditions across Africa. These discoveries have been complemented by a substantial suite of experimental studies, now bridging to the wild through field experiments. These field and experimental studies, particularly those in which direct chimpanzee-child comparisons have been made, delineate a growing set of commonalities between the phenomena of social learning and culture in the lives of chimpanzees and humans...
January 3, 2017: Annual Review of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28043026/venturing-into-the-uncanny-valley-of-mind-the-influence-of-mind-attribution-on-the-acceptance-of-human-like-characters-in-a-virtual-reality-setting
#8
Jan-Philipp Stein, Peter Ohler
For more than 40years, the uncanny valley model has captivated researchers from various fields of expertise. Still, explanations as to why slightly imperfect human-like characters can evoke feelings of eeriness remain the subject of controversy. Many experiments exploring the phenomenon have emphasized specific visual factors in connection to evolutionary psychological theories or an underlying categorization conflict. More recently, studies have also shifted away focus from the appearance of human-like entities, instead exploring their mental capabilities as basis for observers' discomfort...
December 30, 2016: Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28024416/an-evolutionary-perspective-on-mate-rejection
#9
Ashleigh J Kelly, Shelli L Dubbs, Fiona Kate Barlow
We argue that mate rejection and ex-partner relationships are important, multifaceted topics that have been underresearched in social and evolutionary psychology. Mate rejection and relationship dissolution are ubiquitous and form integral parts of the human experience. Both also carry with them potential risks and benefits to our fitness and survival. Hence, we expect that mate rejection would have given rise to evolved behavioral and psychological adaptations. Herein, we outline some of the many unanswered questions in evolutionary psychology on these topics, at each step presenting novel hypotheses about how men and women should behave when rejecting a mate or potential mate or in response to rejection...
October 2016: Evolutionary Psychology: An International Journal of Evolutionary Approaches to Psychology and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018662/the-power-of-associative-learning-and-the-ontogeny-of-optimal-behaviour
#10
Magnus Enquist, Johan Lind, Stefano Ghirlanda
Behaving efficiently (optimally or near-optimally) is central to animals' adaptation to their environment. Much evolutionary biology assumes, implicitly or explicitly, that optimal behavioural strategies are genetically inherited, yet the behaviour of many animals depends crucially on learning. The question of how learning contributes to optimal behaviour is largely open. Here we propose an associative learning model that can learn optimal behaviour in a wide variety of ecologically relevant circumstances. The model learns through chaining, a term introduced by Skinner to indicate learning of behaviour sequences by linking together shorter sequences or single behaviours...
November 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018255/an-affective-neuroscience-framework-for-the-molecular-study-of-internet-addiction
#11
Christian Montag, Cornelia Sindermann, Benjamin Becker, Jaak Panksepp
Internet addiction represents an emerging global health issue. Increasing efforts have been made to characterize risk factors for the development of Internet addiction and consequences of excessive Internet use. During the last years, classic research approaches from psychology considering personality variables as vulnerability factor, especially in conjunction with neuroscience approaches such as brain imaging, have led to coherent theoretical conceptualizations of Internet addiction. Although such conceptualizations can be valuable aid, the research field is currently lacking a comprehensive framework for determining brain-based and neurochemical markers of Internet addiction...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004961/rethinking-the-transmission-gap-what-behavioral-genetics-and-evolutionary-psychology-mean-for-attachment-theory-a-comment-on-verhage-et-al-2016
#12
Nicole Barbaro, Brian B Boutwell, J C Barnes, Todd K Shackelford
Traditional attachment theory posits that attachment in infancy and early childhood is the result of intergenerational transmission of attachment from parents to offspring. Verhage et al. (2016) present meta-analytic evidence addressing the intergenerational transmission of attachment between caregivers and young children. In this commentary, we argue that their appraisal of the behavioral genetics literature is incomplete. The suggested research focus on shared environmental effects may dissuade the pursuit of profitable avenues of research and may hinder progress in attachment theory...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27999558/an-embodied-approach-to-understanding-making-sense-of-the-world-through-simulated-bodily-activity
#13
REVIEW
Firat Soylu
Even though understanding is a very widely used concept, both colloquially and in scholarly work, its definition is nebulous and it is not well-studied as a psychological construct, compared to other psychological constructs like learning and memory. Studying understanding based on third-person (e.g., behavioral, neuroimaging) data alone presents unique challenges. Understanding refers to a first-person experience of making sense of an event or a conceptual domain, and therefore requires incorporation of multiple levels of study, at the first-person (phenomenological), behavioral, and neural levels...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938525/honing-theory-a-complex-systems-framework-for-creativity
#14
Liane Gabora
This paper proposes a theory of creativity, referred to as honing theory, which posits that creativity fuels the process by which culture evolves through communal exchange amongst minds that are self-organizing, self-maintaining, and self-reproducing. According to honing theory, minds, like other self-organizing systems, modify their contents and adapt to their environments to minimize entropy. Creativity begins with detection of high psychological entropy material, which provokes uncertainty and is arousal-inducing...
January 2017: Nonlinear Dynamics, Psychology, and Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27933013/on-elementary-affective-decisions-to-like-or-not-to-like-that-is-the-question
#15
Arthur Jacobs, Markus J Hofmann, Annette Kinder
Perhaps the most ubiquitous and basic affective decision of daily life is deciding whether we like or dislike something/somebody, or, in terms of psychological emotion theories, whether the object/subject has positive or negative valence. Indeed, people constantly make such liking decisions within a glimpse and, importantly, often without expecting any obvious benefit or knowing the exact reasons for their judgment. In this paper, we review research on such elementary affective decisions (EADs) that entail no direct overt reward with a special focus on Neurocognitive Poetics and discuss methods and models for investigating the neuronal and cognitive-affective bases of EADs to verbal materials with differing degrees of complexity...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27933011/psychological-restoration-can-depend-on-stimulus-source-attribution-a-challenge-for-the-evolutionary-account
#16
Andreas Haga, Niklas Halin, Mattias Holmgren, Patrik Sörqvist
Visiting or viewing nature environments can have restorative psychological effects, while exposure to the built environment typically has less positive effects. A classic view is that this difference in restorative potential of nature and built environments depends on differences in the intrinsic characteristics of the stimuli. In addition, an evolutionary account is often assumed whereby restoration is believed to be a hardwired response to nature's stimulus-features. Here, we propose the novel hypothesis that the restorative effects of a stimulus do not entirely depend on the stimulus-features per se, but also on the meaning that people assign to the stimulus...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914166/trauma-related-dissociation-psychological-features-and-psychophysiological-responses-to-script-driven-imagery-in-borderline-personality-disorder
#17
Dana Bichescu-Burian, Jürgen Steyer, Tilman Steinert, Benjamin Grieb, Stefan Tschöke
Defense reactions to threatening situations are vital adaptations to stress that protect organisms from injury and ensure survival. We retrospectively investigated the role of peritraumatic dissociation (PD) in the occurrence of severe psychopathology and dissociative patterns of reactions in borderline personality disorder (BPD). We recruited 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of BPD and 15 healthy controls. The BPD group was divided according to the level of PD (low vs. high): BPD and PD (n = 15) and BPD only (n = 13)...
December 3, 2016: Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27827545/olfactory-enrichment-in-california-sea-lions-zalophus-californianus-an-effective-tool-for-captive-welfare
#18
Mystera M Samuelson, Lisa K Lauderdale, Kelly Pulis, Moby Solangi, Tim Hoffland, Heidi Lyn
In the wild, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are exposed to a wide variety of sensory information, which cannot be replicated in captive environments. Therefore, unique procedures are necessary for maintaining physiological and psychological health in nonhuman animals in captivity. The effects of introducing natural scents to captive enclosures have been investigated in a variety of species, yet they have not been examined in marine mammals. This project explored the behavioral effect of scent added to the environment, with the goal of improving the welfare of sea lions in captivity...
January 2017: Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science: JAAWS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27810708/high-estradiol-and-low-progesterone-are-associated-with-high-assertiveness-in-women
#19
Khandis R Blake, Brock Bastian, Siobhan M O'Dean, Thomas F Denson
Sexual selection theory posits that women are more selective than men are when choosing a mate. This evolutionary theory suggests that "choosiness" increases during the fertile window because the costs and benefits of mate selection are highest when women are likely to conceive. Little research has directly investigated reproductive correlates of choice assertion. To address this gap, in the present research we investigated whether fertility, estradiol, and progesterone influenced general assertiveness in women...
January 2017: Psychoneuroendocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27799083/an-evolutionary-behaviorist-perspective-on-orgasm
#20
Diana S Fleischman
Evolutionary explanations for sexual behavior and orgasm most often posit facilitating reproduction as the primary function (i.e. greater rate of fertilization). Other reproductive benefits of sexual pleasure and orgasm such as improved bonding of parents have also been discussed but not thoroughly. Although sex is known to be highly reinforcing, behaviorist principles are rarely invoked alongside evolutionary psychology in order to account for human sexual and social behavior. In this paper, I will argue that intense sexual pleasure, especially orgasm, can be understood as a primary reinforcer shaped by evolution to reinforce behavior that facilitates reproductive success (i...
2016: Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology
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