Read by QxMD icon Read

Obesity uk

Kay D Mann, Mark S Pearce, Chris J Seal
Observational evidence suggests that increased whole grain (WG) intake reduces the risks of many non-communicable diseases, such as CVD, type 2 diabetes, obesity and certain cancers. More recently, studies have shown that WG intake lowers all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Much of the reported evidence on risk reduction is from US and Scandinavian populations, where there are tangible WG dietary recommendations. At present there is no quantity-specific WG dietary recommendation in the UK, instead we are advised to choose WG or higher fibre versions...
October 21, 2016: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Graham MacGregor
High salt intake is the major cause of raised blood pressure and accordingly leads to cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been shown that high salt intake is associated with an increased risk of obesity through sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Increasing evidence also suggests a direct link. Our study aimed to determine whether there was a direct association between salt intake and obesity independent of energy intake. We analyzed the data from the rolling cross-sectional study-the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008/2009 to 2011/2012...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Amanda Bye, Jill Shawe, Judith Stephenson, Debra Bick, Nataliya Brima, Nadia Micali
OBJECTIVE: Being underweight at pregnancy commencement is associated with a range of adverse maternal and infant outcomes, as is being overweight or obese, yet it is an aspect of maternal health which has been relatively neglected by healthcare professionals and researchers. We aimed to investigate differences in pre-pregnancy and pregnancy healthy lifestyle advice routinely offered by relevant healthcare professionals, including midwives and GPs, to women across three different BMI categories - underweight, normal, and overweight or obese...
September 23, 2016: Midwifery
Ronald Ching Wan Ma, Maria Ines Schmidt, Wing Hung Tam, Harold David McIntyre, Patrick M Catalano
The global epidemic of obesity has led to an increasing number of obese women of reproductive age. Obesity is associated with reduced fertility, and pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity are associated with adverse outcomes, including increased risk of gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, instrumental and caesarean births, infections, and post-partum haemorrhage. The medical and obstetric management of obese women is focused on identifying, addressing, and preventing some of these associated complications, and is a daunting challenge given the high percentage of patients with obesity and few therapeutic options proven to improve outcomes in this population...
October 10, 2016: Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
Lawrence Doi, Andrew James Williams, John Frank
BACKGROUND: Adiposity rebound is considered critical to the development of overweight and obesity. The purpose of this study was to investigate how growth has changed in comparison to the UK 1990 BMI growth reference curves between the ages 4-8 years and identify any marked deviations in growth. We also examined potential maternal and child risk/protective factors associated with the altered growth patterns. METHODS: We used data from birth cohort 1 of the Growing Up in Scotland study...
October 13, 2016: BMC Public Health
Thang S Han, Elon Correa, Michael E J Lean, David M Lee, Terrence W O'Neill, György Bartfai, Gianni Forti, Aleksander Giwercman, Krzysztof Kula, Neil Pendleton, Margus Punab, Martin K Rutter, Dirk Vanderschueren, Ilpo T Huhtaniemi, Frederick C W Wu, Felipe F Casanueva
Diversity in lifestyles and socioeconomic status among European populations, and recent socio-political and economic changes in transitional countries, may affect changes in adiposity. We aimed to determine whether change in the prevalence of obesity varies between the socio-politically transitional North-East European (Łódź, Poland; Szeged, Hungary; Tartu, Estonia), and the non-transitional Mediterranean (Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Florence, Italy) and North-West European (Leuven, Belgium; Malmö, Sweden; Manchester, UK) cities...
October 13, 2016: Endocrine
Kashif Jafri, Christie M Bartels, Daniel Shin, Joel M Gelfand, Alexis Ogdie
OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) including hypertension (HTN), hyperlipidemia (HL), diabetes mellitus (DM), and obesity among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the general population, and to examine the treatment of incident CVRFs in PsA and RA compared to controls. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted within The Health Improvement Network, a medical record database in the United Kingdom, using data from 1994 to 2014...
October 1, 2016: Arthritis Care & Research
Rebecca Gossage-Worrall, Richard I G Holt, Katharine Barnard, Marian E Carey, Melanie J Davies, Chris Dickens, Yvonne Doherty, Charlotte Edwardson, Paul French, Fiona Gaughran, Kathryn Greenwood, Sridevi Kalidindi, Daniel Hind, Kamlesh Khunti, Paul McCrone, Jonathan Mitchell, John Pendlebury, Shanaya Rathod, David Shiers, Najma Siddiqi, Lizzie Swaby, Stephen Wright
BACKGROUND: People with schizophrenia are two to three times more likely to be overweight than the general population. The UK National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends an annual physical health review with signposting to, or provision of, a lifestyle programme to address weight concerns and obesity. The purpose of this randomised controlled trial is to assess whether a group-based structured education programme can help people with schizophrenia to lose weight...
September 29, 2016: Trials
Kylie A Abbott, Tracy L Burrows, Rohith N Thota, Shamasunder Acharya, Manohar L Garg
BACKGROUND: Evidence has suggested that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) improve obesity-induced insulin resistance (IR); however, results from human intervention trials have been equivocal. Recently it has been reported that n-3 PUFA status is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes in women but not in men, suggesting a sex-dependent effect. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether n-3 PUFA interventions affect IR in a sex-dependent manner. DESIGN: Five databases were searched (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Pre-Medline) for randomized controlled trials...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
V M Rodrigues, M Rayner, A C Fernandes, R C de Oliveira, R P da Costa Proença, G M R Fiates
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the nutritional quality of food products marketed at children, with and without nutrient claims, using two different approaches. METHODS: Analyses were performed on a dataset with food composition and labelling data from every packaged food marketed at children sold in a major Brazilian supermarket (n=535). Foods were classified as 'healthier' and 'less healthy' according to the UK/Ofcom nutrient profile model and to the NOVA classification based on level of food processing...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Obesity: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Hans Peter Dietz, Lynda Exton
Natural childbirth ideology has become dominant across much of the developed world. This ideology increasingly clashes with the reality of modern obstetrics, which is dealing with a demographic that is getting older and more obese, hence more complicated, and it has become a danger to the health of women and babies. The most visible expression of these trends is the focus on caesarean section rates which have become a key performance indicator of obstetric services. This trend is resulting in increasingly obvious negative consequences for morbidity and mortality, as chronicled in the Morecambe Bay Report, published in the UK last year...
October 2016: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Alan Glasper
Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses the latest Government initiative to tackle the rising levels of childhood obesity in the UK.
September 22, 2016: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
Janne West, Olof Dahlqvist Leinhard, Thobias Romu, Rory Collins, Steve Garratt, Jimmy D Bell, Magnus Borga, Louise Thomas
INTRODUCTION: Quantitative and accurate measurements of fat and muscle in the body are important for prevention and diagnosis of diseases related to obesity and muscle degeneration. Manually segmenting muscle and fat compartments in MR body-images is laborious and time-consuming, hindering implementation in large cohorts. In the present study, the feasibility and success-rate of a Dixon-based MR scan followed by an intensity-normalised, non-rigid, multi-atlas based segmentation was investigated in a cohort of 3,000 subjects...
2016: PloS One
Laurence Blake, Rui V Duarte, Carole Cummins
OBJECTIVES: The mortality associated with liver disease continues to increase, despite the improvements implemented in the UK healthcare as does the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), given the escalating prevalence of obesity. The currently available methods to assess and monitor the stage of liver disease present several limitations. Recently, multiparametric MRI has been developed to address these limitations. The aim of this study is to develop a decision analytic model for patients with suspected NAFLD, to investigate the effect of adding multiparametric MRI to the diagnostic pathway...
2016: BMJ Open
Ella Zomer, Rachel Leach, Christine Trimmer, Tim Lobstein, Stephen Morris, William P James, Nick Finer
BACKGROUND: Overweight/obesity is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and costs. Weight loss has been shown to reverse some of these effects, reducing the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). AIM: To determine the potential monies available, from an English National Health Service perspective, for weight loss interventions to be cost-effective in the prevention of CVD. METHODS: A Markov model was developed, populated with overweight/obese individuals from the Health Survey for England, aged 30-74 years, free of pre-existing CVD and with available risk factor information to calculate CVD risk...
September 20, 2016: Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism
Graham MacGregor
High salt intake is the major cause of raised blood pressure and accordingly leads to cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been shown that high salt intake is associated with an increased risk of obesity through sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Increasing evidence also suggests a direct link. Our study aimed to determine whether there was a direct association between salt intake and obesity independent of energy intake. We analyzed the data from the rolling cross-sectional study-the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008/2009 to 2011/2012...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Nwe Ni Than, Anwar Ghazanfar, James Hodson, Nadeem Tehami, Chris Coldham, Hynek Mergental, Derek Manas, Tahir Shah, Philip N Newsome, Helen Reeves, Shishir Shetty
INTRODUCTION: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in incidence in the UK and globally. Liver cirrhosis is the common cause for developing HCC. The common reasons for liver cirrhosis are viral hepatitis C (HCV), viral hepatitis B and alcohol. However, HCC caused by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-cirrhosis is now increasingly as a result of rising worldwide obesity. AIM: To compare the clinical presentation, treatment options and outcomes of HCC due to HCV and NAFLD patients...
September 10, 2016: QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians
Živa Korošec, Igor Pravst
OBJECTIVES: The marketing of energy-dense foods is recognised as a probable causal factor in children's overweight and obesity. To stimulate policymakers to start using nutrient profiling to restrict food marketing, a harmonised model was recently proposed by the WHO. Our objective is to evaluate the television advertising of foods in Slovenia using the above-mentioned model. METHODS: An analysis is performed using a representative dataset of 93,902 food-related advertisements broadcast in Slovenia in year 2013...
September 15, 2016: International Journal of Public Health
Emma Loughrill, David Wray, Tatiana Christides, Nazanin Zand
Adequate intake of calcium and phosphorus in the appropriate ratio of 1-2:1 (Ca:P), in addition to magnesium and vitamin D, is vital for bone health and development of an infant. In this feasibility study, the ratio of Ca:P in conjunction with vitamin D and other essential elements (Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn) in a range of commercial infant food products in the UK is investigated. The elemental analysis was carried out using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and vitamin D levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...
September 9, 2016: Maternal & Child Nutrition
C Childs, M R Siraj, F J Fair, A N Selvan, H Soltani, J Wilmott, T Farrell
OBJECTIVE: To develop and refine qualitative mapping and quantitative analysis techniques to define 'thermal territories' of the post-partum abdomen, the caesarean section site and the infected surgical wound. In addition, to explore women's perspectives on thermal imaging and acceptability as a method for infection screening. METHOD: Prospective feasibility study undertaken at a large University teaching hospital, Sheffield UK. Infrared thermal imaging of the abdomen was undertaken at the bedside on the first two days after elective caesarean section...
September 2016: Journal of Wound Care
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"