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Exosome dementia

Qiu-Lan Ma, Edmond Teng, Xiaohong Zuo, Mychica Jones, Bruce Teter, Evan Y Zhao, Cansheng Zhu, Tina Bilousova, Karen H Gylys, Liana G Apostolova, Mary Jo LaDu, Mir Ahamed Hossain, Sally A Frautschy, Gregory M Cole
Synaptic neurodegeneration is thought to be an early event initiated by soluble β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates that closely correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease (AD). Apolipoprotein ε4 (APOE4) is the most common genetic risk factor for both familial AD (FAD) and sporadic AD; it accelerates Aβ aggregation and selectively impairs glutamate receptor function and synaptic plasticity. However, its molecular mechanisms remain elusive and these synaptic deficits are difficult to monitor. AD- and APOE4-dependent plasma biomarkers have been proposed, but synapse-related plasma biomarkers are lacking...
February 28, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
Raphael Schneider, Paul McKeever, TaeHyung Kim, Caroline Graff, John Cornelis van Swieten, Anna Karydas, Adam Boxer, Howie Rosen, Bruce L Miller, Robert Laforce, Daniela Galimberti, Mario Masellis, Barbara Borroni, Zhaolei Zhang, Lorne Zinman, Jonathan Daniel Rohrer, Maria Carmela Tartaglia, Janice Robertson
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) can serve as diagnostic biomarkers, we assessed miRNA expression in the Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative (GENFI) cohort and in sporadic FTD. METHODS: GENFI participants were either carriers of a pathogenic mutation in progranulin, chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 or microtubule-associated protein tau or were at risk of carrying a mutation because a first-degree relative was a known symptomatic mutation carrier...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Edward J Goetzl, Janice B Schwartz, Erin L Abner, Gregory A Jicha, Dimitrios Kapogiannis
OBJECTIVE: Astrocytes fulfill neuronal trophic roles normally, but are transformed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) into A1-type reactive astrocytes that may destroy neurons through unknown mechanisms. METHODS: To investigate astrocyte inflammatory mechanisms, astrocyte-derived exosomes (ADEs) were isolated immunochemically from plasmas of AD patients and matched controls for ELISA quantification of complement proteins. RESULTS: ADE levels of C1q, C4b, C3d, factor B, factor D, Bb, C3b and C5b-C9 terminal complement complex (TCC), but not mannose-binding lectin (MBL), normalized by the CD81 exosome marker were significantly higher for AD patients (n=28) than age- and gender-matched controls (all p<0...
February 6, 2018: Annals of Neurology
Robert E Becker, Nigel H Greig, Debomoy K Lahiri, Joseph Bledsoe, Sarah Majercik, Clive Ballard, Dag Aarsland, Lon S Schneider, Douglas Flanagan, Ramprakash Govindarajan, Mary Sano, Luigi Ferrucci, Dimitrios Kapogiannis
BACKGROUND: Concussion (mild) and other moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share overlapping neuropathologies, including neuronal pre-programmed cell death (PPCD), and clinical impairments and disabilities. Multiple clinical trials targeting mechanisms based on the Amyloid Hypothesis of AD have so far failed, indicating that it is prudent for new drug developments to also pursue mechanisms independent of the Amyloid Hypothesis. To address these issue, we have proposed the use of an animal model of concussion/TBI as a supplement to AD transgenic mice to provide an indication of an AD drug candidate's potential for preventing PPCD and resulting progression towards dementia in AD...
January 10, 2018: Current Alzheimer Research
Georgia Minakaki, Stefanie Menges, Agnes Kittel, Evangelia Emmanouilidou, Iris Schaeffner, Katalin Barkovits, Anna Bergmann, Edward Rockenstein, Anthony Adame, Franz Marxreiter, Brit Mollenhauer, Douglas Galasko, Edit Irén Buzás, Ursula Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Katrin Marcus, Wei Xiang, Dieter Chichung Lie, Kostas Vekrellis, Eliezer Masliah, Jürgen Winkler, Jochen Klucken
The autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) regulates intracellular homeostasis of the cytosolic protein SNCA/alpha-synuclein and is impaired in synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Emerging evidence suggests that ALP influences SNCA release, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Several studies identified SNCA in exosome/extracellular vesicle (EV) fractions. EVs are generated in the multivesicular body compartment and either released upon its fusion with the plasma membrane, or cleared via the ALP...
January 15, 2018: Autophagy
Arif Tasleem Jan, Mudsser Azam, Safikur Rahman, Angham M S Almigeiti, Duk Hwan Choi, Eun Ju Lee, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul Haq, Inho Choi
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid fibrils and abnormal tau proteins in and outside of neurons. Representing a common form of dementia, aggravation of AD with age increases the morbidity rate among the elderly. Although, mutations in the ApoE4 act as potent risk factors for sporadic AD, familial AD arises through malfunctioning of APP, PSEN-1, and-2 genes. AD progresses through accumulation of amyloid plaques (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in brain, which interfere with neuronal communication...
2017: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Edward J Goetzl, Erin L Abner, Gregory A Jicha, Dimitrios Kapogiannis, Janice B Schwartz
Interactions of the presynaptic proteins, neuronal pentraxin 2 (NPTX2) and neurexin 2α (NRXN2α), with their respective postsynaptic functional partners, GluA4-containing glutamate (AMPA4) receptor and neuroligin 1 (NLGN1), enhance excitatory synaptic activity in some areas of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. As early damage of such excitatory circuits in the brain tissues of participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) correlates with cognitive losses, plasma neuron-derived exosome (NDE) levels of these 2 pairs of specialized synaptic proteins were quantified to assess their biomarker characteristics...
October 12, 2017: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Jason Pitt, Kyle C Wilcox, Vanessa Tortelli, Luan Pereira Diniz, Maira S Oliveira, Cassandra Dobbins, Xiao-Wen Yu, Sathwik Nandamuri, Flávia C A Gomes, Nadia DiNunno, Kirsten L Viola, Fernanda G De Felice, Sergio T Ferreira, William L Klein
Synaptopathy underlying memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly thought to be instigated by toxic oligomers of the amyloid beta peptide (AβOs). Given the long latency and incomplete penetrance of AD dementia with respect to Aβ pathology, we hypothesized that factors present in the CNS may physiologically protect neurons from the deleterious impact of AβOs. Here we employed physically separated neuron-astrocyte cocultures to investigate potential non-cell autonomous neuroprotective factors influencing AβO toxicity...
October 1, 2017: Molecular Biology of the Cell
Eric D Hamlett, Aurélie Ledreux, Huntington Potter, Heidi J Chial, David Patterson, Joaquin M Espinosa, Brianne M Bettcher, Ann-Charlotte Granholm
Every person with Down syndrome (DS) has the characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology in their brain by the age of forty, and most go on to develop AD dementia. Since people with DS show highly variable levels of baseline function, it is often difficult to identify early signs of dementia in this population. The discovery of blood biomarkers predictive of dementia onset and/or progression in DS is critical for developing effective clinical diagnostics. Our recent studies show that neuron-derived exosomes, which are small extracellular vesicles secreted by most cells in the body, contain elevated levels of amyloid-beta peptides and phosphorylated-Tau that could indicate a preclinical AD phase in people with DS starting in childhood...
September 4, 2017: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Jason Pitt, Kyle C Wilcox, Vanessa Tortelli, Luan Pereira Diniz, Maira S Oliveira, Cassandra Dobbins, Xiao-Wen Yu, Sathwik Nandamuri, Flávia C A Gomes, Nadia DiNunno, Kirsten L Viola, Fernanda G De Felice, Sergio T Ferreira, William L Klein
Synaptopathy underlying memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly thought to be instigated by toxic oligomers of the amyloid beta peptide (AβOs). Given the long latency and incomplete penetrance of AD dementia with respect to Aβ pathology, we hypothesized that factors present in the CNS may physiologically protect neurons from the deleterious impact of AβOs. Here we employed physically-separated neuron-astrocyte co-cultures to investigate potential non cell-autonomous neuroprotective factors influencing AβO toxicity...
August 9, 2017: Molecular Biology of the Cell
Bjoern von Einem, Judith Eschbach, Martin Kiechle, Anke Wahler, Dietmar R Thal, Pamela J McLean, Jochen H Weishaupt, Albert C Ludolph, Christine A F von Arnim, Karin M Danzer
Several age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation of toxic peptides. α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation and the resulting cytotoxicity is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as dementia with Lewy bodies. Rising evidence points to oligomeric and pre-fibrillar forms as the pathogenic species, and oligomer secretion seems to be crucial for the spreading and progression of PD pathology. Recent studies implicate that dysfunctions in endolysosomal/autophagosomal pathways increase α-syn secretion...
July 15, 2017: Aging
Chet Raj Ojha, Jessica Lapierre, Myosotys Rodriguez, Seth M Dever, Mohammad Asad Zadeh, Catherine DeMarino, Michelle L Pleet, Fatah Kashanchi, Nazira El-Hage
The autophagy-lysosomal pathway mediates a degradative process critical in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis as well as the preservation of proper organelle function by selective removal of damaged proteins and organelles. In some situations, cells remove unwanted or damaged proteins and RNAs through the release to the extracellular environment of exosomes. Since exosomes can be transferred from one cell to another, secretion of unwanted material to the extracellular environment in exosomes may have an impact, which can be beneficial or detrimental, in neighboring cells...
July 6, 2017: Viruses
Patrick Reilly, Charisse N Winston, Kelsey R Baron, Margarita Trejo, Edward M Rockenstein, Johnny C Akers, Najla Kfoury, Marc Diamond, Eliezer Masliah, Robert A Rissman, Shauna H Yuan
Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and progressive supranuclear palsy, which are associated with the pathological aggregation of tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Studies have characterized tau as a "prion-like" protein given its ability to form distinct, stable amyloid conformations capable of transcellular and multigenerational propagation in clonal fashion. It has been proposed that progression of tauopathy could be due to the prion-like propagation of tau, suggesting the possibility that end-stage pathologies, like NFT formation, may require an instigating event such as tau seeding...
October 2017: Neurobiology of Disease
Jennifer Ngolab, Ivy Trinh, Edward Rockenstein, Michael Mante, Jazmin Florio, Margarita Trejo, Deborah Masliah, Anthony Adame, Eliezer Masliah, Robert A Rissman
Proteins implicated in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) have been identified in bodily fluids encased in extracellular vesicles called exosomes. Whether exosomes found in DLB patients can transmit pathology is not clear. In this study, exosomes were successfully harvested through ultracentrifugation from brain tissue from DLB and AD patients as well as non-diseased brain tissue. Exosomes extracted from brains diagnosed with either AD or DLB contained aggregate-prone proteins...
June 9, 2017: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
S Kumar, M Vijayan, J S Bhatti, P H Reddy
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are found in the circulatory biofluids considering the important molecules for biomarker study in aging and age-related diseases. Blood or blood components (serum/plasma) are primary sources of circulatory miRNAs and can release these in cell-free form either bound with some protein components or encapsulated with microvesicle particles, called exosomes. miRNAs are quite stable in the peripheral circulation and can be detected by high-throughput techniques like qRT-PCR, microarray, and sequencing...
2017: Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science
Dario Valdinocci, Rowan A W Radford, Sue Maye Siow, Roger S Chung, Dean L Pountney
Intracellular aggregates of the α-synuclein protein result in cell loss and dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonism, such as multiple system atrophy and dementia with Lewy bodies. Each of these neurodegenerative conditions, known collectively as α-synucleinopathies, may be characterized by a different suite of molecular triggers that initiate pathogenesis. The mechanisms whereby α-synuclein aggregates mediate cytotoxicity also remain to be fully elucidated. However, recent studies have implicated the cell-to-cell spread of α-synuclein as the major mode of disease propagation between brain regions during disease progression...
February 22, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Anuradha Kalani, Pankaj Chaturvedi, Claudio Maldonado, Philip Bauer, Irving G Joshua, Suresh C Tyagi, Neetu Tyagi
Although type-2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to increase the risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Dementia-like pathology is attributed to the accumulation of cellular prion protein (PrPc ) which plays a role in cognitive dysfunction. However, its involvement and regulation in diabetic dementia-like pathology is not well understood. Using T2D db/db (leptin receptor knockout) mice subjected to object recognition and Y-maze behavioral tests, we determined that short-term memory was compromised and that the mice displayed abrupt spontaneous behaviour compared to db/m control mice...
April 2017: Molecular and Cellular Neurosciences
Tingting Xiao, Weiwei Zhang, Bin Jiao, Chu-Zheng Pan, Xixi Liu, Lu Shen
Exosomes are small vesicles secreted by most cell types including neurons that function in intercellular communication through transfer of their cargo or encapsulate and eliminate unnecessary cellular components and therefore have a broad impact on nerve development, activation and regeneration. In addition, exosomes have been observed to be involved in spreading pathological misfolded proteins, thereby leading to the onset and propagation of disease. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and characterized by two types of lesions: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles...
2017: Translational Neurodegeneration
Eric D Hamlett, Edward J Goetzl, Aurélie Ledreux, Vitaly Vasilevko, Heather A Boger, Angela LaRosa, David Clark, Steven L Carroll, María Carmona-Iragui, Juan Fortea, Elliott J Mufson, Marwan Sabbagh, Abdul H Mohammed, Dean Hartley, Eric Doran, Ira T Lott, Ann-Charlotte Granholm
INTRODUCTION: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology and dementia early in life. Blood biomarkers of AD neuropathology would be valuable, as non-AD intellectual disabilities of DS and AD dementia overlap clinically. We hypothesized that elevations of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and phosphorylated-tau in neuronal exosomes may document preclinical AD. METHODS: AD neuropathogenic proteins Aβ1-42 , P-T181-tau, and P-S396-tau were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in extracts of neuronal exosomes purified from blood of individuals with DS and age-matched controls...
May 2017: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Thomas Westergard, Brigid K Jensen, Xinmei Wen, Jingli Cai, Elizabeth Kropf, Lorraine Iacovitti, Piera Pasinelli, Davide Trotti
Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T) to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs). DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases...
October 11, 2016: Cell Reports
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