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Root nodule bacteria

Anne-Marie Garnerone, Fernando Sorroche, Lan Zou, Céline Mathieu-Demazière, Chang Fu Tian, Catherine Masson-Boivin, Jacques Batut
An ongoing signal exchange fine-tunes the symbiotic interaction between rhizobia and legumes, ensuring the establishment and maintenance of mutualism. In a recently identified regulatory loop, endosymbiotic S. meliloti exert a negative feedback on root infection in response to unknown plant cues. Upon signal perception, three bacterial Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) of the inner membrane, CyaD1, CyaD2 and CyaK, synthesize the second messenger cAMP that, together with the cAMP-dependent Clr transcriptional activator, activates the expression of genes involved in root infection control...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Bacteriology
Xiaodong Liu, Yantao Luo, Zhefei Li, Gehong Wei
Mesorhizobium alhagi CCNWXJ12-2T , isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Alhagi sparsifolia , contains two type III secretion systems (T3SSs). T3SSs are specialized machinery with wide distribution in bacteria that inject effector proteins into target cells. Our previous study showed that the expression of M. alhagi T3SS1 is upregulated in high-salt conditions. Here, phylogenetic analysis of T3SS1 using the core protein RhcU suggested that T3SS1 belongs to the α-Rhc II subgroup of the Rhc T3SS family...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Jacklyn Thomas, Megan J Bowman, Andres Vega, Ha Ram Kim, Arijit Mukherjee
Auxins can induce the formation of nodule-like structures (NLS) in plant roots even in the absence of rhizobia and nitrogen-fixing bacteria can colonize these structures. Interestingly, NLS can be induced in roots of both legumes and non-legumes. However, our understanding of NLS formation in non-legumes at a molecular level is limited. This study aims to investigate NLS formation at a developmental and molecular level in Brachypodium distachyon. We treated Brachypodium roots with the synthetic auxin, 2,4-D, to induce NLS at a high frequency (> 80%) under controlled conditions...
March 6, 2018: Functional & Integrative Genomics
Joaquín Clúa, Carla Roda, María Eugenia Zanetti, Flavio A Blanco
The root nodule symbiosis established between legumes and rhizobia is an exquisite biological interaction responsible for fixing a significant amount of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. The success of this interaction depends on the recognition of the right partner by the plant within the richest microbial ecosystems on Earth, the soil. Recent metagenomic studies of the soil biome have revealed its complexity, which includes microorganisms that affect plant fitness and growth in a beneficial, harmful, or neutral manner...
February 27, 2018: Genes
Isabel M López-Lara, Joaquina Nogales, Ángel Pech-Canul, Nieves Calatrava-Morales, Lydia M Bernabéu-Roda, Paloma Durán, Virginia Cuéllar, José Olivares, Laura Alvarez, Diana Palenzuela-Bretones, Manuel Romero, Stephan Heeb, Miguel Cámara, Otto Geiger, María J Soto
Surface motility and biofilm formation are behaviours which enable bacteria to infect their hosts and are controlled by different chemical signals. In the plant symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the lack of long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity (FadD) leads to increased surface motility, defects in biofilm development, and impaired root colonization. In this study, analyses of lipid extracts and volatiles revealed that a fadD mutant accumulates 2-tridecanone (2-TDC), a methylketone known as a natural insecticide...
February 28, 2018: Environmental Microbiology
Claus Lang, Lucinda S Smith, Sharon R Long
The formation of nitrogen fixing root nodules by Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti requires communication between both organisms and coordinated differentiation of plant and bacterial cells. After an initial signal exchange, the bacteria invade the tissue of the growing nodule via plant-derived tubular structures, called infection threads. The bacteria are released from the infection threads into invasion-competent plant cells, where they differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Both organisms undergo dramatic transcriptional, metabolic and morphological changes during nodule development...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Agnieszka Klonowska, Rémy Melkonian, Lucie Miché, Pierre Tisseyre, Lionel Moulin
BACKGROUND: Rhizobial symbionts belong to the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (called "alpha" and "beta"-rhizobia). Most knowledge on the genetic basis of symbiosis is based on model strains belonging to alpha-rhizobia. Mimosa pudica is a legume that offers an excellent opportunity to study the adaptation toward symbiotic nitrogen fixation in beta-rhizobia compared to alpha-rhizobia. In a previous study (Melkonian et al., Environ Microbiol 16:2099-111, 2014) we described the symbiotic competitiveness of M...
January 30, 2018: BMC Genomics
Naveen Kumar Arora, Ekta Khare, Sachin Singh, Sakshi Tewari
Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) is one of the most important legumes grown in the northern province of Uttar Pradesh, India. However, its productively in Uttar Pradesh is lower than the average yield of adjoining states. During the course of the present study, a survey of pigeon pea growing agricultural fields was carried out and it was found that 80% of plants were inadequately nodulated. The study was aimed to evaluate the pigeon pea symbiotic compatibility and nodulation efficiency of root nodulating bacteria isolated from various legumes, and to explore the phenetic and genetic diversity of rhizobial population nodulating pigeon pea growing in fields of Uttar Pradesh...
January 2018: 3 Biotech
Raphael Ledermann, Ilka Bartsch, Barbara Müller, Janine Wülser, Hans-Martin Fischer
Phylogenetically diverse bacteria respond to various stress conditions by mounting a general stress response (GSR) resulting in the induction of protecting or damage repair functions. In α-proteobacteria, the GSR is induced by a regulatory cascade consisting of the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor σEcfG, its anti-σ factor NepR and the anti-anti-σ factor PhyR. We have reported previously that σEcfG and PhyR of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens (formerly named Bradyrhizobium japonicum), the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiont of soybean and related legumes, are required for efficient symbiosis, however, the precise role of the GSR remained undefined...
December 26, 2017: Molecular Plant-microbe Interactions: MPMI
Michelle E Afkhami, D Luke Mahler, Jean H Burns, Marjorie G Weber, Martin F Wojciechowski, Janet Sprent, Sharon Y Strauss
How species interactions shape global biodiversity and influence diversification is a central - but also data-hungry - question in evolutionary ecology. Microbially based mutualisms are widespread and could cause diversification by ameliorating stress and thus allowing organisms to colonize and adapt to otherwise unsuitable habitats. Yet the role of these interactions in generating species diversity has received limited attention, especially across large taxonomic groups. In the massive angiosperm family Leguminosae, plants often associate with root-nodulating bacteria that ameliorate nutrient stress by fixing atmospheric nitrogen...
February 2018: Ecology
Manoj-Kumar Arthikala, Jesús Montiel, Rosana Sánchez-López, Noreide Nava, Luis Cárdenas, Carmen Quinto
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) regulate numerous plant cell processes, including the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Rapid and transient ROS production was reported after Phaseolus vulgaris root hairs were treated with Nod factors, indicating the presence of a ROS-associated molecular signature in the symbiosis signaling pathway. Rboh is a multigene family containing nine members ( RbohA-I ) in P. vulgaris . RNA interference of RbohB suppresses ROS production and attenuates rhizobial infection thread (IT) progression in P...
2017: Frontiers in Plant Science
Junkun Lu, Fucheng Yang, Shengkun Wang, Haibin Ma, Junfeng Liang, Yinglong Chen
Rhizobia induce root nodules and fix atmospheric N2 for most legume species in exchange for carbon. However, the diverse endophytic non-rhizobial bacteria in legume nodules that co-exist with rhizobia are often ignored because they are difficult to cultivate using routine cultivation approaches. To enhance our understanding of the incidence and diversity of legume-bacteria associations, a high-throughput sequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the bacterial community in the rhizospheres and root nodules of Dalbergia odorifera seedlings that were uninoculated or inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii H255, Rhizobium multihospitium- like HT221, or Burkholderia pyrrocinia- like H022238, in two growth media (nitrogen [N]-supplied soil or N-omitted potting mix)...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
Loubna Benidire, Majida Lahrouni, Khalid Daoui, Zain El Abidine Fatemi, Ricardo Gomez Carmona, Michael Göttfert, Khalid Oufdou
Rhizobia are symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in root nodules of legumes. In Morocco, faba bean (Vicia faba L.), which is the main legume crop cultivated in the country, is often grown in marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions. This study examines the phenotypic diversity of rhizobia nodulating V. faba isolated from different regions in Morocco for tolerance to some abiotic stresses. A total of 106 rhizobia strains isolated from nodules were identified at the species level by analysing 16S rDNA. Additionally, for selected strains recA, otsA, kup and nodA fragments were sequenced...
January 2018: Systematic and Applied Microbiology
Suresh Damodaran, Corey S Westfall, Brian A Kisely, Joseph M Jez, Senthil Subramanian
Legume root nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic relationship between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria in soil. Auxin activity is detected in different cell types at different stages of nodule development; as well as an enhanced sensitivity to auxin inhibits, which could affect nodule development. While some transport and signaling mechanisms that achieve precise spatiotemporal auxin output are known, the role of auxin metabolism during nodule development is unclear. Using a soybean root lateral organ transcriptome data set, we identified distinct nodule enrichment of three genes encoding auxin-deactivating GRETCHEN HAGEN 3 (GH3) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) amido transferase enzymes: GmGH3-11/12 , GmGH3-14 and GmGH3-15 ...
November 28, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
J L Boucher
The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) begins with an infection by a bacterium from the class of bacteria that produce and utilize adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and possess an adenosyl transferase enzyme (ATR); these bacteria are the exogenous antigens that cause MS. Human ATR is homologous to bacterial ATR and B cells produce anti-ATR antibodies as an autoimmune response thereby reducing the concentration of ATR and thus limiting production of AdoCbl, one of the two bioactive forms of vitamin B12. The next step in MS pathogenesis is a period of subclinical AdoCbl deficiency over a period of many years resulting in production of odd-carbon-number fatty acids that are incorporated into myelin rendering it antigenic...
November 2017: Medical Hypotheses
Tulu Degefu, Endalkachew Wolde-Meskel, Frank Rasche
Vigna unguiculata, Vigna radiata and Arachis hypogaea growing in Ethiopia are nodulated by a genetically diverse group of Bradyrhizobium strains. To determine the genetic identity and symbiotic effectiveness of these bacteria, a collection of 36 test strains originating from the root nodules of the three hosts was investigated using multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) of core genes including 16S rRNA, recA, glnII, gyrB, atpD and dnaK. Sequence analysis of nodA and nifH genes along with tests for symbiotic effectiveness using δ(15)N analysis were also carried out...
November 16, 2017: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
LongFei Zhao, YaJun Xu, XinHe Lai
A total of 276 endophytic bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of soybean (Glycine max L.) grown in 14 sites in Henan Province, China. The inhibitory activity of these bacteria against pathogenic fungus Phytophthora sojae 01 was screened in vitro. Six strains with more than 63% inhibitory activities were further characterized through optical epifluorescence microscopic observation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene, potential plant growth-promoting properties analysis, and plant inoculation assay...
October 13, 2017: Brazilian Journal of Microbiology: [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology]
Yoshitake Desaki, Kana Miyata, Maruya Suzuki, Naoto Shibuya, Hanae Kaku
Plants possess the ability to recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and PAMPs through the PRRs, and initiate pattern-triggered immunity. MAMPs are derived from cell-envelope components, secreted materials and cytosolic proteins from bacteria, oomycetes or fungi, and some MAMPs play a similar function in the innate immunity in mammals. Chitin is a representative fungal MAMP and triggers defense signaling in a wide range of plant species. The chitin receptors CEBiP and CERK1 on the plasma membrane have LysM (lysin motif) in their ectodomains...
January 1, 2017: Innate Immunity
Michał Kalita, Wanda Małek
The phylogeny of 16 isolates from root nodules of Genista germanica, Genista tinctoria, Cytisus ratisbonensis, and Cytisus scoparius growing in southeast Poland was estimated by comparative sequence analysis of core (16S rDNA, atpD, glnII, recA) and symbiosis-related (nodC, nodZ, nifH) genes. All the sequences analyzed placed the studied rhizobia in the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis of individual and concatenated housekeeping genes showed that the Genisteae microsymbionts form a homogeneous group with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains...
October 16, 2017: Systematic and Applied Microbiology
Malinda S Thilakarathna, Nicholas Moroz, Manish N Raizada
Legumes are protein sources for billions of humans and livestock. These traits are enabled by symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF), whereby root nodule-inhabiting rhizobia bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N) into usable N. Unfortunately, SNF rates in legume crops suffer from undiagnosed incompatible/suboptimal interactions between crop varieties and rhizobia strains. There are opportunities to test much large numbers of rhizobia strains if cost/labor-effective diagnostic tests become available which may especially benefit researchers in developing countries...
2017: Frontiers in Plant Science
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