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X Clement, F Baldairon, P Clavert, J-F Kempf
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 12, 2018: Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Surgery & Research: OTSR
Kristian Thorborg, Michael P Reiman, Adam Weir, Joanne L Kemp, Andreas Serner, Andrea Mosler, Per Hölmich
Study Design Groin pain is common in athletes participating in multidirectional sports and has traditionally been considered a difficult problem to understand, diagnose, and manage. This may be due to sparse historical focus on this complex region in sports medicine. Until recently, there was no agreement regarding terminology, definitions, and classification of groin pain in athletes. This has made clear communication between clinicians difficult, and the results of research difficult to interpret and implement into practice...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Cara L Lewis, Kari L Loverro, Anne Khuu
Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Background Despite recognition that femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) is a movement-related disorder, few studies have examined dynamic unilateral tasks in individuals with FAIS. Objectives 1) Determine if individuals with FAIS have different pelvis and lower extremity movements than individuals without hip pain during a single leg stepdown. 2) Analyze kinematic differences between males and females within groups. Methods Individuals with FAIS and individuals without hip pain performed a single leg stepdown while kinematic data were collected...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Paul Harradine, Lucy Gates, Catherine Bowen
The use of subtalar joint neutral (STJN) in the assessment and treatment of foot-related musculoskeletal symptomology is common in daily practice and still widely taught. The main pioneer of this theory was Dr Merton L. Root, and it has been labeled with a variety of names: "the foot morphology theory," "the subtalar joint neutral theory," or simply "Rootian theory" or "Root model." The theory's core concepts still underpin a common approach to musculoskeletal assessment of the foot, as well as the consequent design of foot orthoses...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Kevin Hall, John D Borstad
Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint that is difficult to treat because of the biomechanical complexity of the shoulder region, the interplay between mobility and stability, and the vital role played by the shoulder in moving, positioning, and providing stability for hand function. Despite advances in biomechanics and pain science, there is still much to learn about how impairments influence shoulder function and health. One impairment, posterior shoulder tightness (PST), is often noted in individuals with shoulder pain and consequently has generated much discussion and debate in recent years...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Andrew Tomas
A 52-year-old man sustained an injury to the right wrist following a fall into a push-up position. Direct-access outpatient physical therapy evaluation was performed 24 hours after the injury. A scaphoid radiograph series, consistent with American College of Radiology guidelines, was obtained based upon examination findings. The radiographs revealed a scapholunate gap of 4 mm and a scapholunate angle of greater than 60°, suggestive of scapholunate dissociation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(3):225. doi:10...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Jeremy Lewis
In 1972, American orthopaedic surgeon Charles Neer published his seminal paper, "Anterior Acromioplasty for the Chronic Impingement Syndrome in the Shoulder: A Preliminary Report." It wasn't a robust scientific paper; however, it changed the direction of orthopaedic practice for the next half century. Neer argued that a primary cause of shoulder pain was attrition of the supraspinatus tendon and related structures from the overlying acromion, especially when the arm was elevated. Neer recommended surgical removal to stop the impingement, and over the last half century, it could be argued that millions of people around the globe would have undergone acromioplasty surgery to stop this portion of the bone impinging onto the soft tissues located in the subacromial space...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Rosemarie A Curley, Alycia Markowski
A 50-year-old woman with an 8-year history of diffuse systemic sclerosis, a form of scleroderma, was referred by her rheumatologist to physical therapy for decreased finger range of motion (ROM) and pain that adversely affected her dexterity and ability to perform activities of daily living. To determine whether joint mobilization would be appropriate for this patient, posterior-to-anterior and modified lateral radiographs of both hands were requested by the physical therapist. Images showed significant bone loss in the distal phalanges of both thumbs and in the left third and fourth digits, and calcinosis in the tips of both thumbs...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Carlos G Helguero, Vamiq M Mustahsan, Sunjit Parmar, Sahana Pentyala, John L Pfail, Imin Kao, David E Komatsu, Srinivas Pentyala
J ORTHOP SURG RES (2017) 12: 195. HTTPS://DOI.ORG/10.1186/S13018-017-0700-2: In the original publication of this article [1] there was an error in one of the author names. In this publication the correct and incorrect name are indicated.
February 19, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
Norio Imai, Tomoyuki Ito, Ken Suda, Dai Miyasaka, Naoto Endo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 15, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic Science: Official Journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association
Evan J Petersen, Stephanie M Thurmond
Study Design Resident's case problem. Background Patients presenting with multiple symptomatic areas pose a diagnostic challenge for the physical therapist. Though musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms typically present separately, they can occur simultaneously and mimic each other. Consequently, the ability to differentiate between musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms is an important skill for physical therapists. The purpose of this resident's case problem was to describe the clinical-reasoning process leading to medical and physical therapy management of a patient presenting with upper and lower back pain, bilateral radiating arm and leg pain, and abdominal pain...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
David Griswold, Ken Learman, Morey J Kolber, Bryan O'Halloran, Joshua A Cleland
Study Design Randomized clinical trial. Background The comparative effectiveness between nonthrust manipulation (NTM) and thrust manipulation (TM) for mechanical neck pain has been investigated, with inconsistent results. Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of concordant cervical and thoracic NTM and TM for patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods The Neck Disability Index (NDI) was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), numeric pain-rating scale (NPRS), deep cervical flexion endurance (DCF), global rating of change (GROC), number of visits, and duration of care...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Noriaki Yokogawa, Masahiro Ishikawa, Kohei Nishitani, Christopher A Beck, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya, Addisu Mesfin, Stephen L Kates, John L Daiss, Chao Xie, Edward M Schwarz
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) reinfection following revision surgery remains a major orthopaedic problem. Toward the development of immunotherapy with anti-glucosaminidase monoclonal antibodies (anti-Gmd), we aimed to: (i) develop a murine 1-stage exchange model of bioluminescent MRSA (USA300LAC::lux) contaminated femoral implants; and (ii) utilize this model to demonstrate the synergistic effects of combination vancomycin and anti-Gmd therapy on reinfection and bone healing. Following an infection surgery, the original plate and two screws were removed on day 7, and exchanged with sterile implants...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic Research: Official Publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Neil E O'Connell, Stephen P Ward
The burden that low back pain (LBP) presents to sufferers and society is well established. This ubiquitous condition is served by a complex global clinical marketplace offering a wide range of assessment alternatives and accompanying interventions. Yet, while the costs of care are rising, the global burden does not appear to be diminishing. Considerable effort internationally has gone into developing CPGs for LBP. The authors highlight the similarities and differences between existing CPGs for LBP, as well as strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for improvement in the implementation of guidelines generally...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
(no author information available yet)
Meniscus and articular cartilage lesions are common knee injuries. The resulting knee pain and mobility impairments can be improved by physical therapists during nonoperative and operative management. Recommendations from clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) such as this revision, titled "Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions," published in the February 2018 issue of JOSPT, can help physical therapists engage in evidence-informed practice and reduce unnecessary clinical variation...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Annina B Schmid, Louise Hailey, Brigitte Tampin
Entrapment neuropathies are the most prevalent type of peripheral neuropathy and often a challenge to diagnose and treat. To a large extent, our current knowledge is based on empirical concepts and early (often biomechanical) studies. This Viewpoint will challenge some of the current beliefs with recent advances in both basic and clinical neurosciences. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(2):58-62. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.0603.
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
(no author information available yet)
An injury to your knee meniscus or joint cartilage can happen when you move suddenly or repeatedly move the wrong way. If you have such an injury, you may feel knee pain and have limited motion. Physical therapists can ensure that you and others with these injuries receive quality care to optimize recovery. The goal of revised clinical practice guidelines published in the February 2018 issue of the JOSPT is to make recommendations based on best practices from recent published literature for the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and determination of patient readiness to return to activities following knee meniscus or joint cartilage injury...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Justin M Lantz, Kimiko A Yamada, Raymond J Hah
A 25-year-old woman presented to her primary care physician with thoracic spine pain; two weeks later, she returned to her primary care physician with lumbar spine pain that limited exercise and sitting for 30 minutes or less. The patient was referred to physical therapy for examination, then referred back to her primary care physician after complaints raised concern for a mass or other source of neurologic compression. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and revealed 4 sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
David S Logerstedt, David A Scalzitti, Kim L Bennell, Rana S Hinman, Holly Silvers-Granelli, Jay Ebert, Karen Hambly, James L Carey, Lynn Snyder-Mackler, Michael J Axe, Christine M McDonough
The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these revised clinical practice guidelines is to review recent peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to meniscus and articular cartilage lesions...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Grace C Johnson, Monica Christensen
A 23-year-old woman initiated a running program and after 2 months began experiencing right hip joint pain and sharp pain at the iliac crest. Following evaluation by her primary care physician, she was referred to a physical therapist. Eighteen months later, the patient had developed a bony prominence at the iliac crest that was painful to touch. She returned to see her primary care physician. Radiographs of the right hip and pelvis were completed and showed a lytic lesion that warranted additional imaging...
February 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
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