keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Neuroscience emotions

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29469663/a-neuroscience-oriented-research-approach-to-borderline-personality-disorder
#1
Barbara Stanley, M Mercedes Perez-Rodriguez, Christa Labouliere, Steven Roose
Traditionally, the study of personality disorders had been based on psychoanalytic or behavioral models. Over the past two decades, there has been an emerging neuroscience model of borderline personality disorder (BPD) grounded in the concept of BPD as a condition in which dysfunctional neural circuits underlie its pathological dimensions, some of which include emotion dysregulation (broadly encompassing affective instability, negative affectivity, and hyperarousal), abnormal interpersonal functioning, and impulsive aggression...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Personality Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29467362/media-use-and-brain-development-during-adolescence
#2
REVIEW
Eveline A Crone, Elly A Konijn
The current generation of adolescents grows up in a media-saturated world. However, it is unclear how media influences the maturational trajectories of brain regions involved in social interactions. Here we review the neural development in adolescence and show how neuroscience can provide a deeper understanding of developmental sensitivities related to adolescents' media use. We argue that adolescents are highly sensitive to acceptance and rejection through social media, and that their heightened emotional sensitivity and protracted development of reflective processing and cognitive control may make them specifically reactive to emotion-arousing media...
February 21, 2018: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29460349/adolescent-brain-development-implications-for-understanding-risk-and-resilience-processes-through-neuroimaging-research
#3
Amanda Sheffield Morris, Lindsay M Squeglia, Joanna Jacobus, Jennifer S Silk
This special section focuses on research that utilizes neuroimaging methods to examine the impact of social relationships and socioemotional development on adolescent brain function. Studies include novel neuroimaging methods that further our understanding of adolescent brain development. This special section has a particular focus on how study findings add to our understanding of risk and resilience. In this introduction to the special section, we discuss the role of neuroimaging in developmental science and provide a brief review of neuroimaging methods...
March 2018: Journal of Research on Adolescence: the Official Journal of the Society for Research on Adolescence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432512/theory-of-drives-and-emotions-from-sigmund-freud-to-jaak-panksepp
#4
REVIEW
Cezary Żechowski
The article discusses the development of psychoanalytic theory in the direction of broadening the reflection on their own based on data derived from empirical studies other than clinical case study. Particularly noteworthy is the convergence that followed between neuroscience and psychoanalysis and the rise of the so-called neuropsychoanalysis. Consequently, this led to eject empirical hypotheses and begin research on defense mechanisms, self, memory, dreams, empathy, dynamic unconscious and emotional-motivational processes (theory of drives)...
December 30, 2017: Psychiatria Polska
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432037/applying-a-cognitive-neuroscience-perspective-to-disruptive-behavior-disorders-implications-for-schools
#5
Patrick M Tyler, Stuart F White, Ronald W Thompson, R J R Blair
A cognitive neuroscience perspective seeks to understand behavior, in this case disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), in terms of dysfunction in cognitive processes underpinned by neural processes. While this type of approach has clear implications for clinical mental health practice, it also has implications for school-based assessment and intervention with children and adolescents who have disruptive behavior and aggression. This review articulates a cognitive neuroscience account of DBD by discussing the neurocognitive dysfunction related to emotional empathy, threat sensitivity, reinforcement-based decision-making, and response inhibition...
February 12, 2018: Developmental Neuropsychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29410608/toward-a-neuroscience-of-adult-cognitive-developmental-theory
#6
Fady Girgis, Darrin J Lee, Amir Goodarzi, Jochen Ditterich
Piaget's genetic epistemology has provided the constructivist approach upon which child developmental theories were founded, in that infants are thought to progress through distinct cognitive stages until they reach maturity in their early 20's. However, it is now well established that cognition continues to develop after early adulthood, and several "neo-Piagetian" theories have emerged in an attempt to better characterize adult cognitive development. For example, Kegan's Constructive Developmental Theory (CDT) argues that the thought processes used by adults to construct their reality change over time, and reaching higher stages of cognitive development entails becoming objectively aware of emotions and beliefs that were previously in the realm of the subconscious...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29406267/brain-mechanisms-underlying-reading-the-mind-from-eyes-voice-and-actions
#7
Melissa D Thye, Donna L Murdaugh, Rajesh K Kana
Evidence from cognitive and social neuroscience research suggests that Theory of Mind (ToM), the ability to attribute mental states to others, is mediated by a group of brain regions collectively known as the ToM network. Nevertheless, there is significant variability in the functional activation of regions within this network across tasks. The goal of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine the common and differential neural mechanisms of two aspects of ToM processing (emotion/mental-state recognition and intentional attribution) using three distinct, but complementary ToM tasks (Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RMIE), Reading the Mind in the Voice (RMIV), and Intentional Causal Attribution) in healthy adults...
February 3, 2018: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29399606/a-brief-introduction-to-the-neurogenetics-of-cognition-emotion-interactions
#8
Matthew A Scult, Ahmad R Hariri
Neuroscience research has demonstrated that cognition, emotion, and their dynamic interactions emerge from complex and flexible patterns of activity across distributed neural circuits. A parallel branch of research in genetics has begun to identify common variation in the human DNA sequence (i.e., genome) that may shape individual differences in cognition-emotion interactions by altering molecular and cellular pathways that modulate the activity of these neural circuits. Here we provide a brief introduction to such neurogenetics research and how it may usefully inform our understanding of the biological mechanisms through which dynamic cognition-emotion interactions emerge and, subsequently, help shape normal and abnormal behavior...
February 2018: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29398558/physics-of-mind-experimental-confirmations-of-theoretical-predictions
#9
REVIEW
Félix Schoeller, Leonid Perlovsky, Dmitry Arseniev
What is common among Newtonian mechanics, statistical physics, thermodynamics, quantum physics, the theory of relativity, astrophysics and the theory of superstrings? All these areas of physics have in common a methodology, which is discussed in the first few lines of the review. Is a physics of the mind possible? Is it possible to describe how a mind adapts in real time to changes in the physical world through a theory based on a few basic laws? From perception and elementary cognition to emotions and abstract ideas allowing high-level cognition and executive functioning, at nearly all levels of study, the mind shows variability and uncertainties...
February 2, 2018: Physics of Life Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29395858/cognitive-reappraisal-intervention-for-suicide-prevention-crisp-for-middle-aged-and-older-adults-hospitalized-for-suicidality
#10
Dimitris N Kiosses, George S Alexopoulos, Greg Hajcak, William Apfeldorf, Paul R Duberstein, David Putrino, James J Gross
Middle-aged and older adults constitute a high suicide-risk group. Among adults aged 50 years old and older, suicide rates increased and suicide deaths almost doubled during the period from 2000 to 2015. Suicide rates are elevated for patients hospitalized for suicidality (i.e., active suicidal ideation or suicide attempt) and the 3 months post-hospitalization is the time of the highest suicide risk. Psychosocial interventions for middle-aged and older adults hospitalized for suicidality are sparse. In this article, we present the main aspects, stages, techniques and a clinical case study of Cognitive Reappraisal Intervention for Suicide Prevention (CRISP), a psychosocial intervention targeting cognitive reappraisal to reduce suicide risk in middle-aged and older adults who have been recently hospitalized for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt...
December 27, 2017: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29384786/early-risk-and-resiliency-factors-predict-chronic-posttraumatic-stress-disorder-in-caregivers-of-patients-admitted-to-a-neuroscience-icu
#11
Karmel W Choi, Kelly M Shaffer, Emily L Zale, Christopher J Funes, Karestan C Koenen, Tara Tehan, Jonathan Rosand, Ana-Maria Vranceanu
OBJECTIVES: Informal caregivers-that is, close family and friends providing unpaid emotional or instrumental care-of patients admitted to ICUs are at risk for posttraumatic stress disorder. As a first step toward developing interventions to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder in ICU caregivers, we examined the predictive validity of psychosocial risk screening during admission for caregiver posttraumatic stress disorder at 3 and 6 months post hospitalization. DESIGN: An observational, prospective study...
January 30, 2018: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29378297/deconstructing-arousal-into-wakeful-autonomic-and-affective-varieties
#12
REVIEW
Ajay B Satpute, Philip A Kragel, Lisa Feldman Barrett, Tor D Wager, Marta Bianciardi
Arousal plays a central role in a wide variety of phenomena, including wakefulness, autonomic function, affect and emotion. Despite its importance, it remains unclear as to how the neural mechanisms for arousal are organized across them. In this article, we review neuroscience findings for three of the most common origins of arousal: wakeful arousal, autonomic arousal, and affective arousal. Our review makes two overarching points. First, research conducted primarily in non-human animals underscores the importance of several subcortical nuclei that contribute to various sources of arousal, motivating the need for an integrative framework...
January 26, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29371263/tulsa-1000-a-naturalistic-study-protocol-for-multilevel-assessment-and-outcome-prediction-in-a-large-psychiatric-sample
#13
Teresa A Victor, Sahib S Khalsa, W Kyle Simmons, Justin S Feinstein, Jonathan Savitz, Robin L Aupperle, Hung-Wen Yeh, Jerzy Bodurka, Martin P Paulus
INTRODUCTION: Although neuroscience has made tremendous progress towards understanding the basic neural circuitry underlying important processes such as attention, memory and emotion, little progress has been made in applying these insights to psychiatric populations to make clinically meaningful treatment predictions. The overall aim of the Tulsa 1000 (T-1000) study is to use the NIMH Research Domain Criteria framework in order to establish a robust and reliable dimensional set of variables that quantifies the positive and negative valence, cognition and arousal domains, including interoception, to generate clinically useful treatment predictions...
January 24, 2018: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29371024/from-neuroscience-to-evidence-based-psychological-treatments-the-promise-and-the-challenge-ecnp-march-2016-nice-france
#14
Guy M Goodwin, Emily A Holmes, Erik Andersson, Michael Browning, Andrew Jones, Johanna Lass-Hennemann, Kristoffer Nt Månsson, Carolin Moessnang, Elske Salemink, Alvaro Sanchez, Linda van Zutphen, Renée M Visser
This ECNP meeting was designed to build bridges between different constituencies of mental illness treatment researchers from a range of backgrounds with a specific focus on enhancing the development of novel, evidence based, psychological treatments. In particular we wished to explore the potential for basic neuroscience to support the development of more effective psychological treatments, just as this approach is starting to illuminate the actions of drugs. To fulfil this aim, a selection of clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and neuroscientists were invited to sit at the same table...
January 19, 2018: European Neuropsychopharmacology: the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29364988/socio-affective-touch-expression-database
#15
Haemy Lee Masson, Hans Op de Beeck
Socio-affective touch communication conveys a vast amount of information about emotions and intentions in social contexts. In spite of the complexity of the socio-affective touch expressions we use daily, previous studies addressed only a few aspects of social touch mainly focusing on hedonics, such as stroking, leaving a wide range of social touch behaviour unexplored. To overcome this limit, we present the Socio-Affective Touch Expression Database (SATED), which includes a large range of dynamic interpersonal socio-affective touch events varying in valence and arousal...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29352032/the-surprising-subtleties-of-changing-fear-memory-a-challenge-for-translational-science
#16
REVIEW
Merel Kindt
Current pharmacological and psychological treatments for disorders of emotional memory only dampen the affective response while leaving the original fear memory intact. Under adverse circumstances, these original memories regain prominence, causing relapses in many patients. The (re)discovery in neuroscience that after reactivation consolidated fear memories may return to a transient labile state, requiring a process of restabilization in order to persist, offers a window of opportunity for modifying fear memories with amnestic agents...
March 19, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29300237/dedicated-afternoon-rounds-for-icu-patients-families-and-family-satisfaction-with-care
#17
Urs Weber, Jennifer Johnson, Nathanial Anderson, Andrea K Knies, Belinda Nhundu, Cynthia Bautista, Kevin B Huang, Muhammad Hamza, Jessica White, Anna Coppola, Kathleen M Akgün, David M Greer, Evie G Marcolini, Emily J Gilmore, Nils H Petersen, Nona Timario, Kelly Poskus, Kevin N Sheth, David Y Hwang
OBJECTIVE: It was hypothesized that adding dedicated afternoon rounds for patients' families to supplement standard family support would improve overall family satisfaction with care in a neuroscience ICU. DESIGN: Pre- and postimplementation (pre-I and post-I) design. SETTING: Single academic neuroscience ICU. PATIENTS: Patients in the neuroscience ICU admitted for longer than 72 hours or made comfort measures only at any point during neuroscience ICU admission...
January 3, 2018: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29290330/affective-science-and-avoidant-end-of-life-communication-can-the-science-of-emotion-help-physicians-talk-with-their-patients-about-the-end-of-life
#18
Jesse A Soodalter, Greg J Siegle, Michele Klein-Fedyshin, Robert Arnold, Yael Schenker
Despite believing end-of-life (EOL) discussions with patients are important, doctors often do not have them. Multiple factors contribute to this shortfall, which interventions including reimbursement changes and communication skills training have not significantly improved to date. One commonly cited but under-researched reason for physician avoidance of EOL discussion is emotional difficulty. High occupational demand for frequent difficult discussions may overload physicians' normal emotional functioning, leading to avoidance or failure...
December 11, 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29287909/ethological-approach-to-social-isolation-effects-in-behavioral-studies-of-laboratory-rodents
#19
REVIEW
Hiroyuki Arakawa
The aim of the present review is to discuss how housing conditions affect behavioral performance in laboratory rodents from an ethological view. Commonly used laboratory rodents such as rats and mice, are originally captured animals that largely retain species-typical natural behaviors, while have fully adapted to a laboratory setting after long-term domestication. Laboratory settings including caging and artificial group housing are a considerable ethological factor influencing rodents' behaviors in commonly employed behavioral test paradigms, including emotional and defensive behaviors, learning and memory, and attention-related behaviors...
December 26, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29287628/sex-differences-in-the-brain-implications-for-behavioral-and-biomedical-research
#20
REVIEW
Elena Choleris, Liisa A M Galea, Farida Sohrabji, Karyn M Frick
Biological differences between males and females are found at multiple levels. However, females have too often been under-represented in behavioral neuroscience research, which has stymied the study of potential sex differences in neurobiology and behavior. This review focuses on the study of sex differences in the neurobiology of social behavior, memory, emotions, and recovery from brain injury, with particular emphasis on the role of estrogens in regulating forebrain function. This work, presented by the authors at the 2016 meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, emphasizes varying approaches from several mammalian species in which sex differences have not only been documented, but also become the focus of efforts to understand the mechanistic basis underlying them...
February 2018: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
keyword
keyword
19440
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"