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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544539/intensive-care-unit-admissions-and-ventilation-support-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#1
Ed Oakley, Vi Chong, Meredith Borland, Jocelyn Neutze, Natalie Phillips, David Krieser, Stuart Dalziel, Andrew Davidson, Susan Donath, Kim Jachno, Mike South, Amanda Fry, Franz E Babl
OBJECTIVES: To describe the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, type of ventilation support provided and risk factors for ICU admission in infants with bronchiolitis. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records and Australia and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) registry data for infants 2-12 months old admitted with bronchiolitis. SETTING: Seven Australian and New Zealand hospitals. These infants were prospectively identified through the comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis (CRIB) study between 2009 and 2011...
May 19, 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28524026/-high-flow-nasal-cannulae-oxygen-in-patients-with-respiratory-failure-a-meta-analysis
#2
Weigang Yue, Zhigang Zhang, Caiyun Zhang, Liping Yang, Jufang He, Yuying Hou, Ying Tang, Jinhui Tian
OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of high-flow nasal cannulae oxygen (HFNC) in patients with respiratory failure. METHODS: Computerized PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, CNKI, CBM, VIP, Wanfang Database up to March 31st, 2017, all published available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies about HFNC therapy for patients with respiratory failure were searched. The control group was treated with face mask oxygen therapy (FM) or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), while the experimental group was treated with HFNC...
May 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506664/heliox-delivered-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula-improves-oxygenation-in-infants-with-respiratory-syncytial-virus-acute-bronchiolitis
#3
Wael Seliem, Amira M Sultan
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to evaluate the hypothesis that use of heliox would result in improvement of gas exchange when used with high flow nasal cannula in infants with RSV acute bronchiolitis. METHODS: All patients that met the inclusion criteria were randomized to either heliox (70:30) or air-oxygen mixture 30% via high flow nasal cannula at 8L/min for a continuous 24h. Measurements were taken at baseline, after 2h, and at the end of the 24h...
May 12, 2017: Jornal de Pediatria
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28505486/respiratory-support-techniques-to-avoid-desaturation-in-critically-ill-patients-requiring-endotracheal-intubation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#4
REVIEW
Vincenzo Russotto, Andrea Cortegiani, Santi Maurizio Raineri, Cesare Gregoretti, Antonino Giarratano
PURPOSE: To evaluate which respiratory support method for critically ill patients undergoing endotracheal intubation (ETI) is associated with less desaturation. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus and CINAHL databases. We included randomized (RCT) and non-randomized (non-RCT) studies investigating any method of respiratory support before/during ETI compared to a reference control. RESULTS: Apneic oxygenation (ApOx) was the most commonly investigated respiratory support technique for critically ill patients undergoing intubation (4 RCTs, 358 patients)...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489289/introducing-high-flow-nasal-cannula-to-the-neonatal-transport-environment
#5
Michael A Boyle, Arunava Dhar, Susan Broster
We are encouraged to see that other neonatal transport services are using High-Flow nasal cannula (HFNC) respiratory support during neonatal transport as outlined by Brunton et al (1). The experiences appear to be broadly similar across the two services, however, due to the central location of the neonatal transport base and the well served road network in the East of England region air transports are not conducted. Despite the increasing numbers of articles relating to HFNC use in neonatal units and consensus statements on best practice there is a relative paucity of data relating to its use on transport (2,3)...
May 10, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28487415/randomized-comparison-of-helmet-cpap-versus-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-in-pediatric-respiratory-distress
#6
Giovanna Vitaliti, Maria Concetta Vitaliti, Maria Carla Finocchiaro, Vita Antonella Di Stefano, Piero Pavone, Nassim Matin, Nazgol Motamed-Gorji, Riccardo Lubrano, Raffaele Falsaperla
BACKGROUND: The current study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of 2 noninvasive respiratory support methods, which included helmet CPAP and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in children with respiratory distress admitted to a pediatric intermediate care unit. METHODS: This study was a prospective observational study conducted on children with respiratory distress (age 1-24 months) who were admitted to our acute and emergency operative unit. All included subjects were randomly treated with helmet CPAP or HFNC in a 1:1 fashion until their clinical picture, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gas (ABG) parameters resolved...
May 9, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466461/high-flow-nasal-cannula-to-prevent-postextubation-respiratory-failure-in-high-risk-non-hypercapnic-patients-a-randomized-multicenter-trial
#7
Rafael Fernandez, Carles Subira, Fernando Frutos-Vivar, Gemma Rialp, Cesar Laborda, Joan Ramon Masclans, Amanda Lesmes, Luna Panadero, Gonzalo Hernandez
BACKGROUND: Extubation failure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but cannot be safely predicted or avoided. High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) prevents postextubation respiratory failure in low-risk patients. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that HFNC reduces postextubation respiratory failure in high-risk non-hypercapnic patients compared with conventional oxygen. METHODS: Randomized, controlled multicenter trial in patients who passed a spontaneous breathing trial...
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459412/-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-patients-after-trachea-extubation
#8
Jiawei Shen, Youzhong An
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is one primary cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admittance, which is usually treated with intubation and mechanical ventilation in order to maintain a necessary ventilation and oxygenation function. After the remove of trachea tube, available oxygenation supports include nasal cannula, venturi mask, non-invasive ventilator and high flow nasal cannula (HFNC). In this article we reviewed the physiological mechanism related to HFNC therapy and trails about the application of HFNC in extubated patients...
January 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459282/use-of-nasal-high-flow-in-stable-copd-rationale-and-physiology
#9
Lara Pisani, Maria Laura Vega
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a device able to deliver heated and humidified oxygen at high flows (up to 60 L/minutes). Potential benefits of HFNC are several and include the improvement of lung mucociliary clearance, the washout of upper airway dead space, the generation of a low level of positive airway pressure (PEEP effect), the decrease in inspiratory resistance and at the same time the increase in expiratory resistance. The present review aimed to describe the evidence surrounding the use of HFNC in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients...
May 1, 2017: COPD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28442633/positive-end-expiratory-pressure-effect-of-3-high-flow-nasal-cannula-devices
#10
Jing-Chao Luo, Mei-Shan Lu, Zhi-Hong Zhao, Wei Jiang, Biao Xu, Li Weng, Tong Li, Bin Du
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is supposed to provide additional PEEP compared with conventional oxygen therapy. However, the exact determinants of this PEEP effect are unclear. We investigated the factors that might affect the PEEP and compared PEEP performance among 3 HFNC devices. METHODS: Three available HFNC devices were evaluated: the AIRVO 2 device and 2 mechanical ventilators (SV300 and Monnal T75). A device consisting of a test lung (5600i) and an airway model (AMT(IE)) was used to simulate spontaneous breathing...
April 25, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441053/evaluation-of-oxygen-administration-with-a-high-flow-nasal-cannula-to-clinically-normal-dogs
#11
Jennifer L Daly, Christine L Guenther, Jamie M Haggerty, Iain Keir
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of oxygen administration by use of a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in sedated clinically normal dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult dogs undergoing routine dental prophylaxis. PROCEDURES Dogs were sedated with butorphanol tartrate and dexmedetomidine. An esophageal balloon catheter was inserted into the esophagus, a double-pronged nasal cannula was inserted into the nares, and a catheter was inserted into the dorsal pedal artery. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency...
May 2017: American Journal of Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429603/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-ventilation-on-reintubation-rate-in-adult-patients-after-extubation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#12
Hua-Wei Huang, Xiu-Mei Sun, Zhong-Hua Shi, Guang-Qiang Chen, Lu Chen, Jan O Friedrich, Jian-Xin Zhou
PURPOSE: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on reintubation in adult patients. PROCEDURES: Ovid Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched up to November 1, 2016, for RCTs comparing HFNC versus conventional oxygen therapy (COT) or noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in adult patients after extubation. The primary outcome was reintubation rate, and the secondary outcomes included complications, tolerance and comfort, time to reintubation, length of stay, and mortality...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425965/comparison-of-cpap-and-hfnc-in-management-of-bronchiolitis-in-infants-and-young-children
#13
Majken Bisgaard Pedersen, Signe Vahlkvist
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used in infants with bronchiolitis for decades. Recently, high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was introduced We conducted a retrospective study of treatment with CPAP vs. HFNC between 2013 and 2015, comparing the development in respiratory rate, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and heart rate, treatment failure, duration of treatment, and length of hospital stay. A sample size of 49 children were included. Median age was 1.9 months. Median baseline pCO₂ was 7...
April 20, 2017: Children
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424245/oral-nutrition-in-children-with-bronchiolitis-on-high-flow-nasal-cannula-is-well-tolerated
#14
Anthony Alexander Sochet, Jessica Ann McGee, Tessie Wazeerah October
OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of aspiration-related respiratory failure and nutrition interruptions in children with bronchiolitis on high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) receiving enteral nutrition. METHODS: We performed a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study within a 313-bed tertiary medical center from January through December 2015. We included term children 1 month to 2 years of age without comorbid bacterial pneumonia or chronic medical conditions who were diagnosed with bronchiolitis while receiving HFNC and enteral nutrition...
May 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424243/nutrition-and-high-flow-nasal-cannula-respiratory-support-in-children-with-bronchiolitis
#15
Katherine N Slain, Natalia Martinez-Schlurmann, Steven L Shein, Anne Stormorken
OBJECTIVES: No guidelines are available regarding initiation of enteral nutrition in children with bronchiolitis on high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) support. We hypothesized that the incidence of feeding-related adverse events (AEs) would not be associated with HFNC support. METHODS: This retrospective study included children ≤24 months old with bronchiolitis receiving HFNC in a PICU from September 2013 through April 2014. Data included demographics, respiratory support during feeding, and feeding-related AEs...
May 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399118/feasibility-and-physiological-effects-of-non-invasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-niv-nava-in-preterm-infants
#16
Christopher Gibu, Phillip Cheng, Raymond J Ward, Benjamin Castro, Gregory P Heldt
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist (NIV-NAVA) was introduced to our clinical practice via a pilot and a randomized observational study to assess its safety, feasibility, and short term physiological effects. METHODS: The pilot protocol applied NIV-NAVA to 11 infants on nasal CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), or nasal IMV (NIMV), in multiple 2-4 h periods of NIV-NAVA for comparison. This provided the necessary data to design a randomized, controlled observational cross-over study in 8 additional infants to compare the physiological effects of NIV-NAVA to NIMV during 2-hour steady state conditions...
April 11, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366356/comparison-of-effort-of-breathing-for-infants-on-nasal-modes-of-respiratory-support
#17
Asavari Kamerkar, Justin Hotz, Rica Morzov, Christopher J L Newth, Patrick A Ross, Robinder G Khemani
OBJECTIVE: To directly compare effort of breathing between high flow nasal cannula (HFNC), nasal intermittent mechanical ventilation (NIMV), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). STUDY DESIGN: This was a single center prospective cross-over study for patients <6 months in the cardiothoracic or pediatric intensive care unit receiving nasal noninvasive respiratory support after extubation. We measured effort of breathing using esophageal manometry with pressure-rate product (PRP) on all 3 modes...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353318/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapies-for-respiratory-management-in-pediatric-patients
#18
Gang Liu, Conghai Fan, Hongwei Wu
High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is a non-invasive form of respiratory support that is rapidly being taken up in paediatric intensive care units (PICU). For infants with bronchiolitis - who are the largest non-elective source of admissions to a PICU - there is some evidence that using HFNC therapy reduces the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. The aim of this review article is is to explore, describe, critique and add to the evidence surrounding the use of HFNC therapy in the pediatric population for the management of respiratory distress...
March 27, 2017: Minerva Pediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333694/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-beyond-the-perinatal-period
#19
Michael Lee, Joshua Nagler
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is emerging as a means of oxygen delivery and respiratory support for a range of conditions outside the perinatal period. We aim to review the mechanisms of action and advantages of HFNC and to summarize current findings regarding clinical benefit in specific pediatric disease processes and in patients with significant respiratory distress. RECENT FINDINGS: Currently published studies outside the neonatal population demonstrate both safety and efficacy of this mode of respiratory support...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332328/paediatric-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-children-with-bronchiolitis-a-retrospective-safety-and-efficacy-study-in-a-non-tertiary-environment
#20
Michelle Davison, Mike Watson, Leesa Wockner, Frances Kinnear
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the safety and efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy for children with bronchiolitis in a non-tertiary paediatric setting. METHODS: This was a single-centre retrospective study conducted over 26 months (March 2013-April 2015) on children aged 1-23 months with suspected bronchiolitis, who commenced on HFNC therapy in either the ED or the ward. Changes with respect to baseline data were analysed for effect on work of breathing (WOB), heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR)...
April 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
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