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Nurse initiated

Megan Quinn, Sheila Gephart
BACKGROUND: Palliative care is a holistic framework that is designed to improve quality of life by identifying and treating distressing symptoms of life-threatening or complex conditions. Neonatal palliative care (NPC) has potential benefits for parents, staff, and patients, yet evidence suggests that implementation and utilization of organized NPC services are low. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to answer the clinical question: In neonatal intensive care, what evidence can be used to guide implementation of palliative care protocols? SEARCH STRATEGY: A literature search was conducted using CINAHL (Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases...
October 22, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Fumi Hayashi, Keiko Ozawa, Teruko Kawabata, Yukari Takemi
Objectives Aiming at improvement of the Japan Health Insurance Association's Specific Health Guidance initiatives and human resource development, we conducted a qualitative study to clarify the features necessary for and the challenges hindering the achievement of good performance of the initiatives.Methods From November 2014 to January 2015, we conducted 10 focus group interviews, each 90 minutes long, with 64 public health nurses from 10 Japan Health Insurance Association branches. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were administered to obtain the participants' basic characteristics...
2016: [Nihon Kōshū Eisei Zasshi] Japanese Journal of Public Health
Lucy James, Linda Sweet, Roslyn Donnellan-Fernandez
PROBLEM: Early discharge following birth has become an emerging phenomenon in many countries. It is likely early discharge has an impact on the establishment of breastfeeding. OBJECTIVE: To critically appraise the evidence on what women value in relation to breastfeeding initiation and support, and investigate the impact early discharge can have on these values. METHOD: A literature search was conducted for publications since 2005 using the following databases: Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, Scopus and PsycINFO; 21 primary articles were selected and included in the review...
October 20, 2016: Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives
Trevor Peter, Dennis Ellenberger, Andrea A Kim, Debrah Boeras, Tsehaynesh Messele, Teri Roberts, Wendy Stevens, Ilesh Jani, Alash'le Abimiku, Nathan Ford, Zachary Katz, John N Nkengasong
Scaling up access to HIV viral load testing for individuals undergoing antiretroviral therapy in low-resource settings is a global health priority, as emphasised by research showing the benefits of suppressed viral load for the individual and the whole population. Historically, large-scale diagnostic test implementation has been slow and incomplete because of service delivery and other challenges. Building on lessons from the past, in this Personal View we propose a new framework to accelerate viral load scale-up and ensure equitable access to this essential test...
October 20, 2016: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Mara A Schonberg, Vicky W Li, A Heather Eliassen, Roger B Davis, Andrea Z LaCroix, Ellen P McCarthy, Bernard A Rosner, Rowan T Chlebowski, Susan E Hankinson, Edward R Marcantonio, Long H Ngo
PURPOSE: Accurate risk assessment is necessary for decision-making around breast cancer prevention. We aimed to develop a breast cancer prediction model for postmenopausal women that would take into account their individualized competing risk of non-breast cancer death. METHODS: We included 73,066 women who completed the 2004 Nurses' Health Study (NHS) questionnaire (all ≥57 years) and followed participants until May 2014. We considered 17 breast cancer risk factors (health behaviors, demographics, family history, reproductive factors) and 7 risk factors for non-breast cancer death (comorbidities, functional dependency) and mammography use...
October 21, 2016: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Magnolia Cardona-Morrell, Amanda Chapman, Robin M Turner, Ebony Lewis, Blanca Gallego-Luxan, Michael Parr, Ken Hillman
AIM: To investigate associations between clinical parameters - beyond the evident physiological deterioration and limitations of medical treatment - with in-hospital death for patients receiving Rapid Response System (RRS) attendances. METHODS: Retrospective case-control analysis of clinical parameters for 328 patients aged 60 years and above at their last RRS call during admission to a single teaching hospital in the 2012-2013 calendar years. Generalised estimating equation modelling was used to compare the deceased with a randomly selected sample of those who had RRS calls and survived admission (controls), matched by age group, sex, and hospital ward...
October 18, 2016: Resuscitation
Jill Cox, Loretta Kaes, Miguel Martinez, Daniel Moles
Skin temperature may help prospectively determine whether an area of skin discoloration will evolve into necrosis. A prospective, observational study was conducted in 7 skilled nursing facilities to determine if skin temperature measured using infrared thermography could predict the progression of discolored intact skin (blanchable erythema, Stage 1 pressure ulcer, or sus- pected deep tissue injury [sDTI]) to necrosis and to evaluate if nurses could effectively integrate thermography into the clinical setting...
October 2016: Ostomy/wound Management
Olga Tursunov, Nathan I Cherny, Freda DeKeyser Ganz
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe the experience of family members of patients receiving palliative sedation at the initiation of treatment and after the patient has died and to compare these experiences over time.
. DESIGN: Descriptive comparative study.
. SETTING: Oncology ward at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.
. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of 34 family members of dying patients receiving palliative sedation...
November 1, 2016: Oncology Nursing Forum
Marisa Elena Domino, Mona Kilany, Rebecca Wells, Joseph P Morrissey
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether medical homes have heterogeneous effects in different subpopulations, leveraging the interpretations from a variety of statistical techniques. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Secondary claims data from the NC Medicaid program for 2004-2007. The sample included all adults with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression who were not dually enrolled in Medicare or in a nursing facility. STUDY DESIGN: We modeled a number of monthly service use, adherence, and expenditure outcomes using fixed effects, generalized estimating equation with and without inverse probability of treatment weights, and instrumental variables analyses...
October 21, 2016: Health Services Research
Isabelle Bragard, Nesrine Farhat, Marie-Christine Seghaye, Oliver Karam, Arthur Neuschwander, Yasaman Shayan, Katharina Schumacher
OBJECTIVES: Pediatric cardiac arrest is a rare event. Its management requires technical (TSs) and nontechnical skills (NTSs). We assessed the effectiveness of a simulation-based training to improve these skills in managing life-threatening pediatric cardiac arrhythmias. METHODS: Four teams, each composed of 1 pediatric resident, 1 emergency medicine resident, and 2 pediatric nurses, were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) participating in 5 video-recorded simulation sessions with debriefing or to the control group (CG) assessed 2 times with video-recorded simulation sessions without debriefing at a 2-week interval...
October 18, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Divya Talwar, Tung-Sung Tseng, Margaret Foster, Lei Xu, Lei-Shih Chen
PURPOSE: The completion of the Human Genome Project has enhanced avenues for disease prevention, diagnosis, and management. Owing to the shortage of genetic professionals, genetics/genomics training has been provided to nongenetic health professionals for years to establish their genomic competencies. We conducted a systematic literature review to summarize and evaluate the existing genetics/genomics education programs for nongenetic health professionals. METHODS: Five electronic databases were searched from January 1990 to June 2016...
October 20, 2016: Genetics in Medicine: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics
Margaret Loyet, Amy McLean, Karen Graham, Cheryl Antoine, Kathy Fossick
BACKGROUND: Women carrying a fetus with a suspected or known fetal anomaly have complex needs such as emotional and informational support and help with the logistical aspects of arranging care and treatment from numerous specialists. IMPROVEMENT IN QUALITY OF CARE FOR WOMEN CARRYING A FETUS WITH A SUSPECTED OR KNOWN FETAL ANOMALY:: Our fetal care team was initiated in 2012 to meet the needs of this high-risk pregnant population. The fetal care team nurse coordinator supports the woman and her family through all aspects of care during the pregnancy and neonatal period including scheduling appointments with multiple specialists, being there with her as a support person, keeping her updated, making sure she has accurate information about the fetal diagnosis, and helping her to navigate the complex healthcare system...
November 2016: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Alexa Craig, Christine James, Janelle Bainter, Francis L Lucas, Scott Evans, John Glazer, Donna Dowling
BACKGROUND: The traumatic experiences of parents of babies treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) have been described. No research has assessed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse experience in providing care to hypothermic babies and emotional support to their parents. PURPOSE: To assess NICU nurse attitudes to the provision of TH with respect to perceptions about baby pain/sedation, need for nurse and parent education, decision making about initiation of TH, and barriers to best care...
October 18, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Sandy Middleton, Chris Levi, Simeon Dale, N Wah Cheung, Elizabeth McInnes, Julie Considine, Catherine D'Este, Dominique A Cadilhac, Jeremy Grimshaw, Richard Gerraty, Louise Craig, Verena Schadewaldt, Patrick McElduff, Mark Fitzgerald, Clare Quinn, Greg Cadigan, Sonia Denisenko, Mark Longworth, Jeanette Ward
BACKGROUND: Internationally recognised evidence-based guidelines recommend appropriate triage of patients with stroke in emergency departments (EDs), administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and proactive management of fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing before prompt transfer to a stroke unit to maximise outcomes. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness in EDs of a theory-informed, nurse-initiated, intervention to improve multidisciplinary triage, treatment and transfer (T(3)) of patients with acute stroke to improve 90-day death and dependency...
October 18, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
Andrea Tran
The purpose of the Baby-Friendly hospital initiative is to encourage hospitals to use best practices to support infant feeding, as demonstrated by implementing the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding recommended by the World Health Organization. The journey to becoming a Baby-Friendly designated hospital is challenging but ultimately rewarding. In October 2015, Boulder Community Foothills Hospital, a community hospital with a strong breastfeeding culture and a 98% rate of women who initiate breastfeeding postpartum, became one of the approximately 300 Baby-Friendly designated hospitals in the United States...
October 14, 2016: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Betty Ferrell, Elaine Wittenberg, Vanessa Battista, Gay Walker
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to explore nurse experiences in communication with children about spiritual topics in order to develop training in this area. BACKGROUND: Although spiritual care is essential in pediatric palliative care, few providers receive training about communication with ill children about spirituality. METHODS: Researchers developed a brief survey to prompt nurses to reflect on pediatric palliative care experiences that included spiritual discussions...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Hiromi Rakugi
European guidelines (ESH-ESC2013) for the elderly have discussed well about treatment blood pressure (BP) levels and targeting BP levels. In general, elderly patients with systolic BP (SBP) ≥160 mmHg including individuals older than 80 years in good physical and mental conditions are recommended reducing SBP to between 150 and 140 mmHg. Furthermore, fit elderly patients <80 years old are recommended to consider antihypertensive treatment at SBP values ≥140 mmHg with a target SBP <140 mmHg. On the other hand, frail elderly patients are recommended to leave decisions on antihypertensive therapy to the treating physician, and based on monitoring of the clinical effects of treatment...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Brid O' Brien, Margaret M Graham, Sile Mary Kelly
AIM: To explore nurses' use of the World Health Organization safety checklist in the perioperative setting. BACKGROUND: Promoting quality and safety in health care has received worldwide attention. The World Health Organization surgical safety checklist (2009) is promoted for reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. The checklist has been introduced in Irish perioperative settings. METHOD(S): A descriptive, qualitative approach was utilised...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Nursing Management
A M Acosta, M A D S Lima, G Q Marques, P F Levandovski, L A F Weber
AIM: To translate, adapt and evaluate psychometric properties of the complete (15 items) and reduced (three items) versions of the Care Transitions Measure into Brazilian Portuguese. INTRODUCTION: The Care Transitions Measure assesses the quality of care transitions, from the perspective of patients. As accomplishing effective transitions is a challenge to healthcare systems, the instrument provides an opportunity to assess care transitions and improve quality initiatives...
October 18, 2016: International Nursing Review
Ester Risco, Adelaida Zabalegui, Susana Miguel, Marta Farré, Carme Alvira, Esther Cabrera
OBJECTIVE: To describe the implementation of the Balance of Care model in decision-making regarding the best care for patients with dementia in Spain. METHODS: The Balance of Care model was used, which consists of (1) describing the profile of the typical cases of people with dementia and their caregivers, (2) identifying the most suitable care setting for each of the cases (home-care or long-term care institution), (3) designing specific care plans for each case, and (4) evaluating the cost of the proposed care plans...
October 14, 2016: Gaceta Sanitaria
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