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Nasal ventilation

Alireza Sadeghnia, Behzad Koorang Beheshti, Majid Mohammadizadeh
Background: Considering all the latest achievements in neonatal respiratory care, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is still among the most prevalent morbidity causes in premature infants. Involvement in this process results in longer period of hospitalization for the newborn and in the long run makes the living conditions more difficult. Taking the multifactorial pathogenesis into account, approaches to tackle chronic lung disease (CLD) are mainly focused on interventions and prevention procedures...
2018: International Journal of Preventive Medicine
Andrew G Miller, Michael A Gentle, Lisa M Tyler, Natalie Napolitano
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) use has greatly increased in recent years. In non-neonatal pediatric patients, there are limited data available to guide HFNC use, and clinical practice may vary significantly. The goal of this study was to evaluate current HFNC practice by surveying practicing pediatric respiratory therapists. METHODS: A survey instrument was posted on the American Association for Respiratory Care's AARConnect online social media platform in March 2017...
March 13, 2018: Respiratory Care
E E Connor, Y Zhou, G E Liu
Olfactory receptors are G-protein coupled chemoreceptors expressed on millions of olfactory sensory neurons within the nasal cavity. These receptors detect environmental odorants and signal the brain regarding the location of feed, potential mates, and the presence of possible threats (e.g., predators or chemical toxins). Olfactory receptors also are present in organs outside of the nasal cavity where they bind to molecules such as nutrients and metabolites from the animal's internal environment to elicit physiological responses, including changes in gut motility, ventilation rate, and cellular migration...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Animal Science
Mihir Sarkar, Rajasree Sinha, Satyabrata Roychowdhoury, Sobhanman Mukhopadhyay, Pramit Ghosh, Kalpana Dutta, Shibarjun Ghosh
Background: Early initiation of appropriate noninvasive respiratory support is utmost important intervention to avoid mechanical ventilation in severe bronchiolitis. Aim: This study aims to compare noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and hot humidified high-flow nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) as modes of respiratory support in infants with severe bronchiolitis. Methods: Prospective, randomized, open-label pilot study done in a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
Matthew L Bradshaw, Alexandre Déragon, Pramod Puligandla, Guillaume Emeriaud, Anne-Marie Canakis, Patricia S Fontela
OBJECTIVE: To describe management practices and the factors guiding admission and treatment decisions for viral bronchiolitis across Canadian pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Canadian PICUs. SUBJECTS: Pediatric intensivists. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A survey using two case scenarios (non-intubated vs intubated patients) was developed using focus groups and a literature review...
February 27, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
François Olivier, Sophie Nadeau, Sylvie Bélanger, Anne-Sophie Julien, Edith Massé, Nabeel Ali, Georges Caouette, Bruno Piedboeuf
Background: Minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST) is a new strategy to avoid mechanical ventilation (MV) in respiratory distress syndrome. The primary aim of this study was to test MIST as a means of avoiding MV exposure and pneumothorax occurrence in moderate and late preterm infants (32 to 36 weeks' gestational age). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial including three Canadian centres. Patients were randomized to standard management or to the intervention if they required nasal continuous positive airway pressure of 6 cm H2 O and 35% FiO2 in the first 24 hours of life...
June 2017: Paediatrics & Child Health
Satoki Inoue, Yumiko Tamaki, Shota Sonobe, Junji Egawa, Masahiko Kawaguchi
Background: We describe a pediatric patient who suffered from critical abdominal distention caused by a combination of humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) oxygen therapy and nasal airway. Case presentation: A 21-month-old boy with a history of chronic lung disease was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediately after admission, his airway was established using a tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation was started. Five days after the commencement of mechanical ventilation, finally, his trachea was extubated...
2018: JA Clin Rep
Warren M Zapol, H Cecil Charles, Andrew R Martin, Rui C Sá, Binglan Yu, Fumito Ichinose, Neil MacIntyre, Joseph Mammarappallil, Richard Moon, John Z Chen, Eric T Geier, Chantal Darquenne, G Kim Prisk, Ira Katz
The 21st Congress for the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine included, for the first time, a session on Pulmonary Delivery of Therapeutic and Diagnostic Gases. The rationale for such a session within ISAM is that the pulmonary delivery of gaseous drugs in many cases targets the same therapeutic areas as aerosol drug delivery, and is in many scientific and technical aspects similar to aerosol drug delivery. This article serves as a report on the recent ISAM congress session providing a synopsis of each of the presentations...
February 16, 2018: Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery
Danny Cantin, Djamal Djeddi, Nathalie Samson, Charlène Nadeau, Jean-Paul Praud
Nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) in neonates is increasingly considered due to enhanced alveolar ventilation, absence of patient-ventilator asynchrony and lessened ventilator-induced lung injury. Although any type of non-invasive respiratory support can lead to gastric distension via esophageal air passage and thus promote gastroesophageal refluxes (GERs), we have shown that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP; 6 cmH 2 O) and intermittent positive pressure ventilation (15/4 cmH 2 O) conversely inhibit GERs in lambs...
February 10, 2018: Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
Jennifer M Guay, Dru Carvi, Deborah A Raines, Wendy A Luce
Respiratory distress continues to be a major cause of neonatal morbidity. Current neonatal practice recommends the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in the immediate resuscitation and continued support of neonates of all gestations with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress. Despite the many short- and long-term benefits of nCPAP, many neonatal care units have met resistance in its routine use. Although there have been numerous recent publications investigating the use and outcomes of various modes of nCPAP delivery, surfactant administration, mechanical ventilation, and other forms of noninvasive respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannula, nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation), there has been a relative lack of publications addressing the practical bedside care of infants managed on nCPAP...
January 1, 2018: Neonatal Network: NN
Chang Y Park, Niall C McGonigle
There are numerous surgical approaches for the treatment of pericardial effusions but no clear consensus of best management. We present a 44-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer presenting with a new 2-cm pericardial effusion on ultrasound. In light of the patient's palliative condition and the urgent need for chemotherapy, careful consideration was made for her surgical drainage of the pericardial effusion. Because of the patient's medical comorbidities, a general anesthetic was deemed not to be in the patient's best interest...
February 9, 2018: Innovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery
Mihaela S Stefan, Patrick Eckert, Bogdan Tiru, Jennifer Friderici, Peter K Lindenauer, Jay S Steingrub
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) between 2008 and 2014 in patients 18 years or older at a community teaching hospital. METHODS: Yearly utilization rates of HFNC, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) were calculated among admissions with a set of cardiopulmonary diagnoses (heart failure, COPD, asthma or pneumonia). RESULTS: Among the 41,711 admissions with at least one of the above cardiopulmonary condition, HFNC was utilized in 1,128 or 27...
February 15, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Hrishikesh Hazarika, Anudeep Saxena, Pradeep Meshram, Ajay Kumar Bhargava
Purpose: Several devices are available to take care of difficult airway, but C-MAC D-Blade has scant evidence of its use in nasotracheal intubation in a difficult airway scenario. Aims and Objectives: We compared the C-MAC D-Blade videolaryngoscope™ , and the standard Macintosh laryngoscope for nasal intubation in patients with difficult airways selected by El-Ganzouri risk index using parameters of time and attempts required for intubation, glottic view in terms of Cormack-Lehane grade, ease of intubation, success rate, use of accessory maneuvers, incidence of complications, and hemodynamic changes...
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia
Pierre Singer, Sornwichate Rattanachaiwong
Treating respiratory distress is a priority when managing critically ill patients. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used as a tool to prevent endotracheal intubation. Providing oral or enteral nutritional support during NIV may be perceived as unsafe because of the possible risk of aspiration so that these patients are frequently denied adequate caloric and protein intake. Newly available therapies, such as high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) may allow for more appropriate oral feeding.
February 6, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
F Simon, M Haggard, R M Rosenfeld, H Jia, S Peer, M-N Calmels, V Couloigner, N Teissier
Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common childhood disease defined as the presence of liquid in the middle ear without signs or symptoms of acute ear infection. Children can be impacted mainly with hearing impairment and/or co-occurring recurrent acute otitis media (AOM) thus requiring treatment. Although many meta-analyses and national guidelines have been issued, management remains difficult to standardize, and use of surgical and medical treatments continue to vary. We convened an international consensus conference as part of the 2017 International Federation of Oto-rhino-laryngological Societies Congress, to identify best practices in OME management...
February 2, 2018: European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases
M Okuyama, S Kato, S Sato, J Okazaki, Y Kitamura, T Ishikawa, Y Sato, S Isono
BACKGROUND: Difficult mask ventilation is common and is known to be associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). It is our hypothesis that the incidence of expiratory retropalatal (RP) airway closure (primary outcome) during nasal positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is more frequent in patients with SDB (apnea hypopnea index ≥5 h-1) than non-SDB subjects. METHODS: The severity of SDB was assessed before surgery using a portable sleep monitor. In anaesthetized and paralysed patients with (n=11) and without SDB (n=9), we observed the behaviour of the RP airway endoscopically during nasal PPV with the mouth closed and determined the dynamic RP closing pressure, which was defined as the highest airway pressure above which the RP airway closure was reversed...
January 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Srinivas Murki, Jayesh Singh, Chiragkumar Khant, Swarup Kumar Dash, Tejo Pratap Oleti, Percy Joy, Nandkishor S Kabra
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress...
January 23, 2018: Neonatology
Myoung Kyu Lee, Jaehwa Choi, Bonil Park, Bumjoon Kim, Seok Jeong Lee, Sang-Ha Kim, Suk Joong Yong, Eun Hee Choi, Won-Yeon Lee
INTRODUCTION: Severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a significant event that results in substantial mortality. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of the high flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) therapy in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) compared to non-invasive ventilation (NIV). METHODS: The prospective observational trial was performed to compare the effectiveness between the HFNC and NIV in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic ARF...
February 2, 2018: Clinical Respiratory Journal
Deog Kyeom Kim, Jungsil Lee, Ju Hee Park, Kwang Ha Yoo
Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics...
January 24, 2018: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
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