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Yang Wu, Guanyong Su, Song Tang, Wei Liu, Zhiyuan Ma, Xinmei Zheng, Hongling Liu, Hongxia Yu
Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), a substitute for brominated flame retardants (FRs) that have been phased out of use, is frequently detected in aqueous environments. However, previous studies on its endocrine disrupting effects have mainly focused on terrestrial mammals. Here, to comprehensively evaluate the potential adverse effects of TCEP on aquatic vertebrates, zebrafish was used as a model to examine developmental phenotypes. The underlying mechanisms of toxicity of TCEP were further explored using in silico and in vivo approaches...
October 21, 2016: Chemosphere
Takayoshi Kato, Takeshi Yamamoto, Yoshihide Nakamura, Takuma Nanno, Go Fukui, Yoko Sufu, Yoriomi Hamada, Takako Maeda, Shigehiko Nishimura, Hironori Ishiguchi, Wakako Murakami, Masakazu Fukuda, Xiaojuan Xu, Akihiro Hino, Makoto Ono, Tetsuro Oda, Shinichi Okuda, Shigeki Kobayashi, Noritaka Koseki, Hiroyuki Kyushiki, Masafumi Yano
BACKGROUND: Calmodulin (CaM) is a key modulator of the channel gating function of the ryanodine receptor (RyR). OBJECTIVE: Here, we investigated the pathogenic role of RyR-bound CaM in diastolic Ca(2+) leakage from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and arrhythmogenesis in pressure-overloaded heart failure. METHODS: Pressure overload was induced in 12-week-old mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) using a 27-gauge needle. RESULTS: TAC operation for 8 weeks produced a significant increase in the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and frequent occurrence of lethal arrhythmias after infusion of epinephrine and caffeine in TAC mice...
October 19, 2016: Heart Rhythm: the Official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society
Robyn T Rebbeck, Maram M Essawy, Florentin R Nitu, Benjamin D Grant, Gregory D Gillispie, David D Thomas, Donald M Bers, Razvan L Cornea
Using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we have developed and validated the first high-throughput screening (HTS) method to discover compounds that modulate an intracellular Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), for therapeutic applications. Intracellular Ca(2+) regulation is critical for striated muscle function, and RyR is a central player. At resting [Ca(2+)], an increased propensity of channel opening due to RyR dysregulation is associated with severe cardiac and skeletal myopathies, diabetes, and neurological disorders...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Biomolecular Screening
Yohannes Shiferaw
Spontaneous calcium (Ca) waves in cardiac myocytes are known to underlie a wide range of cardiac arrhythmias. However, it is not understood which physiological parameters determine the onset of waves. In this study, we explore the relationship between Ca signaling between ion channels and the nucleation of Ca waves. In particular, we apply a master equation approach to analyze the stochastic interaction between neighboring clusters of ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. Using this analysis, we show that signaling between clusters can be described as a barrier hopping process with exponential sensitivity to system parameters...
September 2016: Physical Review. E
Zhichao Xiao, Wenting Guo, Bo Sun, Donald J Hunt, Jinhong Wei, Yingjie Liu, Yundi Wang, Ruiwu Wang, Peter P Jones, Thomas G Back, S R Wayne Chen
Recent three-dimensional structural studies reveal that the Central domain of ryanodine receptor (RyR) serves as a transducer that converts long-range conformational changes into the gating of the channel pore. Interestingly, the Central domain encompasses one of the mutation hotspots (corresponding to amino acid residues 3778-4201) that contains a number of cardiac RyR (RyR2) mutations associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the functional consequences of these Central domain RyR2 mutations are not well understood...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
R M Downs, M A Hughes, S T Kinsey, M C Johnson, B L Baumgarner
Caffeine is a widely consumed stimulant that has previously been shown to promote cytotoxic stress and even cell death in numerous mammalian cell lines. Thus far there is little information available regarding the toxicity of caffeine in skeletal muscle cells. Our preliminary data revealed that treating C2C12 myotubes with 5 mM caffeine for 6 h increased nuclear fragmentation and reduced basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in skeletal myotubes. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the pathways by which caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration...
October 4, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Wei Peng, Huaizong Shen, Jianping Wu, Wenting Guo, Xiaojing Pan, Ruiwu Wang, S R Wayne Chen, Nieng Yan
RyR2 is a high-conductance intracellular Ca(2+) channel that controls the release of Ca(2+) from the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum of a variety of cells. Here, we report the structures of RyR2 from porcine heart in both the open and closed states at near atomic resolutions determined using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. Structural comparison reveals breathing motion of the overall cytoplasmic region resulted from the interdomain movements of amino-terminal domains (NTDs), Helical domains, and Handle domains, whereas little intradomain shifts are observed in these armadillo repeats-containing domains...
September 22, 2016: Science
Oliver B Clarke, Wayne A Hendrickson
Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular cation channels that mediate the rapid and voluminous release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) as required for excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Understanding of the architecture and gating of RyRs has advanced dramatically over the past two years, due to the publication of high resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstructions and associated atomic models of multiple functional states of the skeletal muscle receptor, RyR1...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Structural Biology
Montserrat Samsó
Signal transduction by the ryanodine receptor (RyR) is essential in many excitable cells including all striated contractile cells and some types of neurons. While its transmembrane domain is a classic tetrameric, six-transmembrane cation channel, the cytoplasmic domain is uniquely large and complex, hosting a multiplicity of specialized domains. The overall outline and substructure readily recognizable by electron microscopy make RyR a geometrically well-behaved specimen. Hence, for the last two decades, the 3D structural study of the RyR has tracked closely the technological advances in electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), and computerized 3D reconstruction...
September 27, 2016: Protein Science: a Publication of the Protein Society
Clark A Briggs, Shreaya Chakroborty, Grace E Stutzmann
The current state of the AD research field is highly dynamic is some respects, while seemingly stagnant in others. Regarding the former, our current lack of understanding of initiating disease mechanisms, the absence of effective treatment options, and the looming escalation of AD patients is energizing new research directions including a much-needed re-focusing on early pathogenic mechanisms, validating novel targets, and investigating relevant biomarkers, among other exciting new efforts to curb disease progression and foremost, preserve memory function...
September 20, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Nico Hartmann, Steffen Pabel, Jonas Herting, Felix Schatter, André Renner, Jan Gummert, Hanna Schotola, Bernhard C Danner, Lars S Maier, Norbert Frey, Gerd Hasenfuss, Thomas H Fischer, Samuel Sossalla
BACKGROUND: Cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) play a pivotal role in cellular electrophysiology and contractility. Increased RyR2-mediated diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release is linked to heart failure (HF) and arrhythmias. Dantrolene, a drug used for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia, is known to stabilize RyRs in skeletal muscle. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dantrolene on arrhythmogenic triggers and contractile function in human atrial fibrillation (AF) and HF cardiomyocytes (CM)...
September 17, 2016: Heart Rhythm: the Official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society
Tamás Oláh, Dóra Bodnár, Adrienn Tóth, János Vincze, János Fodor, Barbara Reischl, Adrienn Kovács, Olga Ruzsnavszky, Beatrix Dienes, Péter Szentesi, Oliver Friedrich, László Csernoch
Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, but it is unknown whether it affects the muscles directly, or modulates only the motor control of the central nervous system. Although the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) - responsible for the psychoactive effects of the drug in the brain - have recently been shown in skeletal muscle, it is unclear how CB1R-mediated signalling affects the contraction and Ca²⁺ homeostasis of mammalian skeletal muscle. Here we demonstrate that in vitro CB1R activation increased muscle fatigability, decreased the Ca(2+) -sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, but did not alter the amplitude of single twitch contractions...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Physiology
Yu Hong, Hai-Feng Li, Geir Olve Skeie, Fredrik Romi, Hong-Jun Hao, Xu Zhang, Xiang Gao, Jone Furlund Owe, Nils Erik Gilhus
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneity. Antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), titin and ryanodine receptor (RyR) were examined in 437 adult Chinese MG patients. The AChR, MuSK, titin and RyR antibodies were found in 82.2%, 2.3%, 28.4% and 23.8% of all patients. Autoantibody profiles vary among different MG subgroups. Thymoma MG patients had high frequencies of AChR (99.2%), titin (50.8%) and RyR antibodies (46.9%). The titin and RyR antibodies also showed high frequencies in late onset patients (54...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Neuroimmunology
E Wium, A F Dulhunty, N A Beard
Triadin isoforms, splice variants of one gene, maintain healthy Ca(2+) homeostasis in skeletal muscle by subserving several functions including an influence on Ca(2+) release through the ligand-gated ryanodine receptor (RyR1) ion channels. The predominant triadin isoform in skeletal muscle, Trisk 95, activates RyR1 in vitro via binding to previously unidentified amino acids between residues 200 and 232. Here, we identify three amino acids that influence Trisk 95 binding to RyR1 and ion channel activation, using peptides encompassing residues 200-232...
September 5, 2016: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology
Risheng Wei, Xue Wang, Yan Zhang, Saptarshi Mukherjee, Lei Zhang, Qiang Chen, Xinrui Huang, Shan Jing, Congcong Liu, Shuang Li, Guangyu Wang, Yaofang Xu, Sujie Zhu, Alan J Williams, Fei Sun, Chang-Cheng Yin
Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy...
September 2016: Cell Research
Angela C Gomez, Timothy W Holford, Naohiro Yamaguchi
Channel activities of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) are activated by micromolar Ca(2+) and inactivated by higher (~1 mM) Ca(2+) To gain insight into a mechanism underlying Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of RyR1 and its relationship with skeletal muscle diseases, we constructed nine recombinant RyR1 mutants carrying malignant hyperthermia or centronuclear myopathy associated mutations and determined RyR1 channel activities by [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay. These mutations are localized in or near the RyR1 domains which are responsible for Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of RyR1...
August 24, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology
Yoshinori Mikami, Kazunori Kanemaru, Yohei Okubo, Takuya Nakaune, Junji Suzuki, Kazuki Shibata, Hiroki Sugiyama, Ryuta Koyama, Takashi Murayama, Akihiro Ito, Toshiko Yamazawa, Yuji Ikegaya, Takashi Sakurai, Nobuhito Saito, Sho Kakizawa, Masamitsu Iino
Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel...
September 2016: EBioMedicine
Marta Gaburjakova, Jana Gaburjakova
Ca(2+) plays a critical role in several processes involved in skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. One key step in cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is the activation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Although this process is not critical for skeletal E-C coupling, the activation and inhibition of the skeletal ryanodine receptor (RYR1) seems to be important for overall muscle function. The RYR1 and RYR2 channels fall within the large category of Ca(2+) -binding proteins that harbour highly selective Ca(2+) -binding sites to receive and translate the various Ca(2+) signals into specific functional responses...
August 20, 2016: Acta Physiologica
Khushboo Singh, James M Briggs
Mutations in the translocated BCL2 gene are often detected in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs), indicating both their significance and pervasiveness. Large series genome sequencing of more than 200 DLBCLs has identified frequent BCL2 mutations clustered in the exons coding for the BH4 domain and the folded loop domain (FLD) of the protein. However, BCL2 mutations are mostly contemplated to represent bystander events with negligible functional impact on the pathogenesis of DLBCL. BCL2 arbitrates apoptosis through a classic interaction between its hydrophobic groove forming BH1-3 domains and the BH3 domain of pro-apoptotic members of the BCL2 family...
July 2016: Mutation Research. Reviews in Mutation Research
Raúl Aguilar-Roblero, Daniel Quinto, Adrian Báez-Ruíz, José Luis Chávez, Andrea Carmine Belin, Mauricio Díaz-Muñoz, Stephan Michel, Gabriella Lundkvist
The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) contain the major circadian clock responsible for generation of circadian rhythms in mammals. The time measured by the molecular circadian clock must eventually be translated into a neuronal firing rate pattern to transmit a meaningful signal to other tissues and organs in the animal. Previous observations suggest that circadian modulation of ryanodine receptors (RyR) is a key element of the output pathway from the molecular circadian clock. To directly test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of RyR activation and inhibition on real time expression of PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE, intracellular calcium levels and spontaneous firing frequency in mouse SCN neurons...
October 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
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