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Molecular mimicry

Amalia Vartanian, Maria Baryshnikova, Olga Burova, Dariya Afanasyeva, Vsevolod Misyurin, Alexander Belyаvsky, Zoya Shprakh
The increasing incidence of melanoma makes this cancer an important public health problem. Therapeutic resistance is still a major obstacle to the therapy of patients with metastatic melanomas. The aim of this study was to develop the melanoma cell line resistant to DNA-alkylating agents and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in acquired drug resistance. We established a unique melanoma subline Mel MeR resistant to DNA-alkylating drug aranoza by continuous stepwise selection of the Mel Me/WT cell line with increasing concentrations of this drug...
October 21, 2016: Melanoma Research
Gabriela Barcenas-Morales, Peter Jandus, Rainer Döffinger
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Concise overview of the field of anticytokine autoantibodies with a focus on recent developments. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in particular in the analysis of autoantibodies to IFNγ, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IFN-1 are presented. The target epitope for anti-IFNγ autoantibodies has been found to have high homology to a protein from Aspergillus suggesting molecular mimicry as a mechanism of breaking self-tolerance...
October 13, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Georgios Christopoulos, V Christopoulou, J G Routsias, A Babionitakis, C Antoniadis, G Vaiopoulos
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from different ethnic groups present elevated levels of antibodies against Proteus mirabilis. This finding implicates P. mirabilis in the development of RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of P. mirabilis in the etiopathogenesis of RA in Greek RA patients. In this study, 63 patients with RA and 38 healthy controls were included. Class-specific antibodies IgM, IgG, and IgA against three human cross-reactive and non-cross-reactive synthetic peptides from P...
October 8, 2016: Clinical Rheumatology
Haruhiko Fujiwara, Hideki Nishikawa
In addition to the genome editing technology, novel functional analyses using electroporation are powerful tools to reveal the gene function in the color pattern formation. Using these methods, several genes involved in various larval color pattern formation are clarified in the silkworm Bombyx mori and some Papilio species. Furthermore, the coloration pattern mechanism underlying the longtime mystery of female-limited Batesian mimicry of Papilio polytes has been recently revealed. This review presents the recent progress on the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary process of coloration patterns contributing to various mimicry in Lepidoptera, especially focusing on the gene function in the silkworm and Papilio species...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
Mohd Usman Mohd Siddique, Glen J P McCann, Vinay Sonawane, Neill Horley, Ibidapo Steven Williams, Prashant Joshi, Sandip B Bharate, Venkatesan Jayaprakash, Barij N Sinha, Bhabatosh Chaudhuri
Highly selective CYP1B1 inhibitors have potential in the treatment of hormone-induced breast and prostate cancers. Mimicry of potent and selective CYP1B1 inhibitors, α-naphthoflavone and stilbenes, revealed that two sets of hydrophobic clusters suitably linked via a polar linker could be implanted into a new scaffold 'biphenyl ureas' to create potentially a new class of CYP1B1 inhibitors. A series of sixteen biphenyl ureas were synthesized and screened for CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 inhibition in Sacchrosomes™, yeast-derived recombinant microsomal enzymes...
September 26, 2016: Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry
Carine Savarin, Cornelia C Bergmann, David R Hinton, Stephen A Stohlman
Viral infections have long been implicated as triggers of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), a central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating disorder. Epitope spreading, molecular mimicry, cryptic antigen, and bystander activation have been implicated as mechanisms responsible for activating self-reactive (SR) immune cells, ultimately leading to organ-specific autoimmune disease. Taking advantage of coronavirus JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV)-induced demyelination, this study demonstrates that the host also mounts counteractive measures to specifically limit expansion of endogenous SR T cells...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Emily C Green, Yiying Zhang, Heng Li, Marilyn L Minus
Synthetic gel-spun collagen and collagen/nano-carbon fibers were found to exhibit structural mimicry comparable to native tendons. X-ray scattering and microscopy analyses are used to characterize the molecular and fibrillar alignment in the synthetic fibers, where D-banding is observed throughout the spun fibers - consistent with native collagen. For the composite collagen/nano-carbon fibers, the morphology and dispersion quality of the nano-carbons within was found to play a significant role in influencing collagen molecular ordering and fibril alignment...
August 30, 2016: Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
María Perera, Teresa Garrido
OBJECTIVES: Classically, immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was thought to be caused by the destruction and insufficient production of platelets, as mediated by autoantibodies. More recently other immune mechanisms that contribute to the disease have been discovered. This review attempts to address the main unresolved questions in ITP. METHODS: We review the most current knowledge of the pathophysiology of ITP. Immunological effects of available therapies are also described...
September 27, 2016: Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Marni S Crow, Krystal K Lum, Xinlei Sheng, Bokai Song, Ileana M Cristea
In mammalian cells, early defenses against infection by pathogens are mounted through a complex network of signaling pathways shepherded by immune-modulatory pattern-recognition receptors. As obligate parasites, the survival of viruses is dependent on the evolutionary acquisition of mechanisms that tactfully dismantle and subvert the cellular intrinsic and innate immune responses. Here, we review the diverse mechanisms by which viruses that accommodate DNA genomes are able to circumvent activation of cellular immunity...
September 21, 2016: Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Ningwen Tai, Jian Peng, Fuqiang Liu, Elke Gulden, Youjia Hu, Xiaojun Zhang, Li Chen, F Susan Wong, Li Wen
Both animal model and human studies indicate that commensal bacteria may modify type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gut microbes could trigger or protect from diabetes are not fully understood, especially the interaction of commensal bacteria with pathogenic CD8 T cells. In this study, using islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-reactive CD8 T cell receptor NY8.3 transgenic nonobese diabetic mice, we demonstrated that MyD88 strongly modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated T1D development via the gut microbiota...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Experimental Medicine
Patrick Verrando, Maria Capovilla, Roger Rahmani
Epidemiological association studies have revealed a role for pesticides in cancer occurrence, while a growing number of reports have highlighted the deleterious epigenetic modifications that can be produced by environmental factors. However, epidemiological data currently lack molecular support to unravel the epigenetic impact of pesticides on carcinogenesis. Based on epidemiological studies of melanoma, our data show for the first time that trans-nonachlor (TNC), a component of the pesticide chlordane, modulates the microRNA miR-141-3p in human melanocytic cells in vitro, with effects on melanomagenesis parameters...
August 10, 2016: Toxicology
Michelle P Ashton, Anne Eugster, Denise Walther, Natalie Daehling, Stephanie Riethausen, Denise Kuehn, Karin Klingel, Andreas Beyerlein, Stephanie Zillmer, Anette-Gabriele Ziegler, Ezio Bonifacio
Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood...
2016: Scientific Reports
Nese Sinmaz, Tina Nguyen, Fiona Tea, Russell C Dale, Fabienne Brilot
BACKGROUND: Our knowledge of autoantibody-associated diseases of the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous systems has expanded greatly over the recent years. A number of extracellular and intracellular autoantigens have been identified, and there is no doubt that this field will continue to expand as more autoantigens are discovered as a result of improved clinical awareness and methodological practice. In recent years, interest has shifted to uncover the target epitopes of these autoantibodies...
2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Ying Wu, Xiaohong Zhou, Christopher O Barnes, Maria DeLucia, Aina E Cohen, Angela M Gronenborn, Jinwoo Ahn, Guillermo Calero
The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr is required for efficient viral infection of macrophages and promotion of viral replication in T cells. Vpr's biological activities are closely linked to the interaction with human DCAF1, a cellular substrate receptor of the Cullin4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) of the host ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation pathway. The molecular details of how Vpr usurps the protein degradation pathway have not been delineated. Here we present the crystal structure of the DDB1-DCAF1-HIV-1-Vpr-uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG2) complex...
October 2016: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Jingxin Zhang, Lili Qiao, Ning Liang, Jian Xie, Hui Luo, Guodong Deng, Jiandong Zhang
Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a microvascular channel made up of nonendothelial cells, has been accepted as a new model of neovascularization in aggressive tumors, owning to the specific capacity of malignant cells to form vessel-like networks which provide sufficient blood supply for tumor growth. Multiple molecular mechanisms, especially vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2), phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a, have been reported to participate in VM formation which is associated with tumor migration and invasion...
May 2016: Journal of B.U.ON.: Official Journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
Sergio E Rivera-Pirela, Miriam Echeverría, Pedro Salcedo, Georgina Márquez, Zuhey Carrillo, Yennis Parra, Ana María Cipriani, José R Núñez, Melchor Álvarez de Mon
BACKGROUND: The HLA complex involved is a factor in the pathogenesis of leukemia. OBJECTIVES: The presence of class II HLA alleles DRB1 *, DQB1 *, DPA1 *, and DPB1 * was evaluated in 47 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 48 with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) for comparison with 48 healthy volunteers in Zulia, Venezuela, and to evaluate potential associations of HLA with leukemia. METHODS: Low- and high-resolution PCR-SSP was used for class II HLA regions DRB1 *, DQB1 *, DPA1 *, and DPB1 * following the instructions of KIT Olerup SSP Genovision...
July 2016: Revista Alergia Mexico: Organo Oficial de la Sociedad Mexicana de Alergia e Inmunología, A.C
Richard E Rosch, Michael Farquhar, Paul Gringras, Deb K Pal
Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the pediatric age group probably linked to the use of the Pandemrix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can "trigger" narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population. Here, we describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Elena Andreucci, Francesca Bianchini, Alessio Biagioni, Mario Del Rosso, Laura Papucci, Nicola Schiavone, Lucia Magnelli
: Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Fgf2 deregulation contributes to the acquisition of malignant features of melanoma and other cancers. FGF2 is an alternative translation product expressed as five isoforms, a low-molecular-weight (18 KDa) and four high-molecular-weight (22, 22.5, 24, 34 KDa) isoforms, with different subcellular distributions. An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) in its mRNA controls the translation of all the isoforms with the exception for the cap-dependent 34 KDa...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
Chandirasegaran Massilamany, Akram Mohammed, John Dustin Loy, Tanya Purvis, Bharathi Krishnan, Rakesh H Basavalingappa, Christy M Kelley, Chittibabu Guda, Raúl G Barletta, Etsuko N Moriyama, Timothy P L Smith, Jay Reddy
BACKGROUND: We recently reported the identification of Bacillus sp. NRRL B-14911 that induces heart autoimmunity by generating cardiac-reactive T cells through molecular mimicry. This marine bacterium was originally isolated from the Gulf of Mexico, but no associations with human diseases were reported. Therefore, to characterize its biological and medical significance, we sought to determine and analyze the complete genome sequence of Bacillus sp. NRRL B-14911. RESULTS: Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacers, phenotypic microarray, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we propose that this organism belongs to the species Bacillus infantis, previously shown to be associated with sepsis in a newborn child...
2016: BMC Genomics
Archana Pannuri, Christopher A Vakulskas, Tesfalem Zere, Louise C McGibbon, Adrianne N Edwards, Dimitris Georgellis, Paul Babitzke, Tony Romeo
: Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (cAMP-CRP) and CsrA are the principal regulators of the catabolite repression and carbon storage global regulatory systems, respectively. cAMP-CRP controls the transcription of genes for carbohydrate metabolism and other processes in response to carbon nutritional status, while CsrA binds to diverse mRNAs and regulates translation, RNA stability, and/or transcription elongation. CsrA also binds to the regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) CsrB and CsrC, which antagonize its activity...
November 1, 2016: Journal of Bacteriology
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