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Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28520790/correction-a-novel-quantitative-hemolytic-assay-coupled-with-restriction-fragment-length-polymorphisms-analysis-enabled-early-diagnosis-of-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-and-identified-unique-predisposing-mutations-in-japan
#1
Yoko Yoshida, Toshiyuki Miyata, Masanori Matsumoto, Hiroko Shirotani-Ikejima, Yumiko Uchida, Yoshifumi Ohyama, Tetsuro Kokubo, Yoshihiro Fujimura
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0124655.].
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509134/two-cases-of-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-ahus-and-eosinophilic-granulomatosis-with-polyangiitis-egpa-a-possible-relationship
#2
Mercedes Cao, Tamara Ferreiro, Bruna N Leite, Francisco Pita, Luis Bolaños, Francisco Valdés, Angel Alonso, Eduardo Vázquez, Juan Mosquera, María Trigás, Santiago Rodríguez
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. It is related to genetic mutations of the alternative complement pathway and is difficult to differentiate from other prothrombotic microangiopathies. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) (Churg-Strauss syndrome, CSS) is a systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis and a hypereosinophilic disorder where eosinophils seem to induce cell apoptosis and necrosis and therefore, vasculitis...
May 2017: CEN Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508588/at-the-cross-section-of-thrombotic-microangiopathy-and-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-a-narrative-review-of-differential-diagnostics-and-a-problematization-of-nomenclature
#3
REVIEW
Alexander Åkesson, Eva Zetterberg, Jenny Klintman
Complement-mediated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease associated with high mortality and morbidity. Renal biopsies often indicate thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). The condition is caused by an excessive activation of the alternative pathway leading to depositions of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on host cells. It may depend on mutations in complement components and regulatory proteins, or the formation of complement-specific antibodies. Mainly, an environmental trigger (e.g. infection) is needed for the excessive response to develop...
May 16, 2017: Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502324/favorable-long-term-outcomes-of-isolated-liver%C3%A2-transplantation-in-a-child-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-caused-by-a%C3%A2-novel%C3%A2-complement-factor-h-mutation%C3%A2
#4
Heeyeon Cho, Yeonhee Lee
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare syndrome characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury that is usually caused by complement dysregulation. Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the complement system produced in the liver, and CFH gene mutations are the most frequent causes of aHUS. To date, the therapeutic options for aHUS with CFH mutations have consisted of plasma infusions, plasma exchange, kidney transplantation, isolated liver transplantation, or combined liver and kidney transplantation...
May 15, 2017: Clinical Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28501299/severe-hypertension-with-renal-thrombotic-microangiopathy-what-happened-to-the-usual-suspect
#5
Steven Van Laecke, Wim Van Biesen
Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and malignant hypertension can both present with concomitant hypertension and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), rendering policy decisions complex. Timmermans et al. report that patients with severe hypertension and renal TMA might have unrecognized aHUS with underlying complement abnormalities. Based on this, they assert that all patients presenting with severe hypertension and renal TMA should be evaluated for aHUS. It remains uncertain whether this holds equally true for patients with malignant hypertension and renal TMA...
June 2017: Kidney International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28485072/therapeutic-plasma-exchange-in-children-one-center-s-experience
#6
Gerard Cortina, Violeta Ojinaga, Thomas Giner, Magdalena Riedl, Siegfried Waldegger, Alejandra Rosales, Raphaela Trojer, Johannes Hofer
BACKGROUND: Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has evolved to an accepted therapy for selected indications. However, it is technically challenging in children. Moreover, data on safety and efficacy are mainly derived from adult series. The aim of this study was to review the procedure in the context of clinical indications, effectiveness, and safety. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: All TPE procedures performed at a tertiary care hospital during a 12-year period (2005-2016) were retrospectively evaluated...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Clinical Apheresis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28461395/eculizumab-cessation-in-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#7
Samuel A Merrill, Zachary D Brittingham, Xuan Yuan, Alison R Moliterno, C John Sperati, Robert A Brodsky
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 1, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28458317/long-term-eculizumab-treatment-contributes-to-recovery-from-end-stage-renal-disease-caused-by-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#8
Yuji Yamada, Ryohei Abe, Yutaka Okano, Yoshitaka Miyakawa
We experienced a favorable outcome in an adult case of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) after long-term eculizumab treatment. A 38-year-old Japanese man with a history of central retinal vein occlusion was admitted to our hospital with progressive dyspnea. He was found to have non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure two weeks after an episode of the common cold. Plasma exchange was ineffective; therefore, we initiated eculizumab after we excluded other thrombotic microangiopathies...
2017: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28455885/an-extremely-rare-splice-site-mutation-in-the-gene-encoding-complement-factor-i-in-a-patient-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#9
Tina S Ipe, Jooeun Lim, Meredith Anne Reyes, Mike Ero, Christopher Leveque, Bradley Lewis, Jamey Kain
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. The disease is difficult to diagnose due to its similarity with other hematologic disorders, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, genetic mutations are found in 50-70% of patients with aHUS and can be useful in its diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A 40-year-old male presented to our hospital with acute kidney injury, evidenced by high creatinine levels (8...
April 28, 2017: Journal of Clinical Apheresis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447417/diagnostic-approach-to-microangiopathic-hemolytic-disorders
#10
REVIEW
K Kottke-Marchant
Thrombotic micro-angiopathies (TMA) are a group of related disorders that are characterized by thrombosis of the microvasculature and associated organ dysfunction, and encompass congenital, acquired, and infectious etiologies. A hall mark of TMAs is the fragmentation of erythrocytes by the microvascular thrombi, resulting in a hemolytic anemia. There are several distinct pathophysiologies leading to microangiopathic hemolysis, ranging from decreased degradation of von Willebrand factor as seen in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) to endothelial damage facilitated by Escherichia coli shiga toxin or complement dysregulation, seen in shiga toxin-related hemolytic-uremic syndrome (Stx-HUS) and complement-mediated TMA (also called atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome), respectively...
May 2017: International Journal of Laboratory Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439485/treatment-of-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-the-era-of-eculizumab
#11
Rawaa Ebrahem, Salam Kadhem, Quoc Truong
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury (AKI); the main cause of multi-organ failure is related to thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Atypical HUS (aHUS) is a disease of uncontrolled complement activation associated with a high mortality rate and most cases progress to end-stage renal disease. About 50% of patients with this syndrome carry mutations in genes that encode complement proteins. Also, aHUS constitutes an over-activation of the complement pathway which is either inherited, acquired, or both...
March 23, 2017: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439081/long-lasting-neutralization-of-c5-by-sky59-a-novel-recycling-antibody-is-a-potential-therapy-for-complement-mediated-diseases
#12
Taku Fukuzawa, Zenjiro Sampei, Kenta Haraya, Yoshinao Ruike, Meiri Shida-Kawazoe, Yuichiro Shimizu, Siok Wan Gan, Machiko Irie, Yoshinori Tsuboi, Hitoshi Tai, Tetsushi Sakiyama, Akihisa Sakamoto, Shinya Ishii, Atsuhiko Maeda, Yuki Iwayanagi, Norihito Shibahara, Mitsuko Shibuya, Genki Nakamura, Takeru Nambu, Akira Hayasaka, Futa Mimoto, Yuu Okura, Yuji Hori, Kiyoshi Habu, Manabu Wada, Takaaki Miura, Tatsuhiko Tachibana, Kiyofumi Honda, Hiroyuki Tsunoda, Takehisa Kitazawa, Yoshiki Kawabe, Tomoyuki Igawa, Kunihiro Hattori, Junichi Nezu
Dysregulation of the complement system is linked to the pathogenesis of a variety of hematological disorders. Eculizumab, an anti-complement C5 monoclonal antibody, is the current standard of care for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). However, because of high levels of C5 in plasma, eculizumab has to be administered biweekly by intravenous infusion. By applying recycling technology through pH-dependent binding to C5, we generated a novel humanized antibody against C5, SKY59, which has long-lasting neutralization of C5...
April 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434982/novel-monoclonal-antibodies-against-stx1d-and-1e-and-their-use-for-improving-immunoassays
#13
Xiaohua He, Stephanie Patfield, Reuven Rasooly, Daniela Mavrici
Shiga toxins (Stxs) are major causative agents for bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening disease in humans. No effective treatment is available. Early detection of Stxs in clinical samples is critical for disease management. As bacteria evolve, new Stxs are produced; therefore, methods used to identify them need to be improved as well. In this study, new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Stx1d and 1e were developed and used to improve a commercial Stx1 kit. Incorporation of the new mAbs into the Abraxis Stx1 kit not only increased the assay sensitivity to Stx1d, but the assay was conferred the ability to detect Stx1e, a newly identified subtype of Stx1 produced by an atypical Stx-producing bacterial strain, Enterobacter cloacae M12X01451, isolated from a clinical specimen...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Immunological Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424685/analysis-of-linear-antibody-epitopes-on-factor-h-and-cfhr1-using-sera-of-patients-with-autoimmune-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#14
Eszter Trojnár, Mihály Józsi, Katalin Uray, Dorottya Csuka, Ágnes Szilágyi, Danko Milosevic, Vesna D Stojanović, Brankica Spasojević, Krisztina Rusai, Thomas Müller, Klaus Arbeiter, Kata Kelen, Attila J Szabó, György S Reusz, Satu Hyvärinen, T Sakari Jokiranta, Zoltán Prohászka
INTRODUCTION: In autoimmune atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), the complement regulator factor H (FH) is blocked by FH autoantibodies, while 90% of the patients carry a homozygous deletion of its homolog complement FH-related protein 1 (CFHR1). The functional consequence of FH-blockade is widely established; however, the molecular basis of autoantibody binding and the role of CFHR1 deficiency in disease pathogenesis are still unknown. We performed epitope mapping of FH to provide structural insight in the autoantibody recruitment on FH and potentially CFHR1...
2017: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419995/hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-and-kidney-transplantation-a-case-series-and-review-of-the-literature
#15
Sabrina Milan Manani, Grazia Maria Virzì, Anna Giuliani, Anna Clementi, Alessandra Brocca, Daniela Dissegna, Francesca Martino, Emanuele Stefano Giovanni d'Amore, Claudio Ronco
BACKGROUND: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can be triggered by Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection or it can be defined as atypical HUS (aHUS) if it is related to uncontrolled complement activation. aHUS is characterized by a high incidence of recurrence after kidney transplantation, and it can also occur de novo in transplant recipients. Eculizumab is used both to prevent and to treat aHUS following kidney transplantation. In this paper, we report our centre experience and we present 4 cases of HUS in patients who underwent kidney transplantation...
April 19, 2017: Nephron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416508/hus-and-atypical-hus
#16
T Sakari Jokiranta
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by intravascular hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney failure. HUS is usually categorized as typical, caused by shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) infection, atypical HUS (aHUS), usually caused by uncontrolled complement activation, or secondary HUS with a coexisting disease. In recent years, a general understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms driving HUS has increased. Typical (i.e. STEC-HUS) follows a gastrointestinal infection with STEC, while aHUS is associated primarily with mutations or autoantibodies leading to dysregulated complement activation...
April 17, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405075/acquired-thrombotic-thrombocytopenic-purpura-and-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-successfully-treated-with-eculizumab
#17
Appalanaidu Sasapu, Michele Cottler-Fox, Pooja Motwani
Acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening disease with a mortality of up to 90%, if not promptly recognized and treated. We report a 64-year-old woman with this condition who presented with left-sided weakness and seizure-like activity preceded by headache and easy bruising. She did not achieve optimal response to plasma exchange, corticosteroids, rituximab, and vincristine. We initiated treatment with eculizumab, following which she had durable remission that continued for 30 months after discontinuation of the drug...
April 2017: Proceedings of the Baylor University Medical Center
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391332/many-drugs-for-many-targets-novel-treatments-for-complement-mediated-glomerular-disease
#18
Joshua M Thurman
There is a large body of experimental and clinical evidence that complement activation contributes to glomerular injury in multiple different diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms that trigger complement activation vary from disease to disease. Immune complexes activate the classical pathway of complement in many types of glomerulonephritis, whereas the alternative pathway and mannose-binding lectin pathways are directly activated in some diseases. Eculizumab is an inhibitory antibody to C5 that has been approved for the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and case reports suggest that it is also effective in other types of glomerulonephritis...
January 1, 2017: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387984/practical-issues-in-using-eculizumab-for-children-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-the-acute-phase-a-review-of-4-patients
#19
Chikako Terano, Kenji Ishikura, Riku Hamada, Yasuhiro Yoshida, Wataru Kubota, Yusuke Okuda, Shunsuke Shinozuka, Ryoko Harada, Sunao Iyoda, Yoshihiro Fujimura, Yuko Hamasaki, Hiroshi Hataya, Masataka Honda
AIM: Recently eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to C5, was found to improve the disease course of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and has been recommended as the first line treatment by an international consensus guideline. However, several practical issues in the use of eculizumab for the acute phase of aHUS have yet to be resolved. METHODS: Children who received eculizumab with diagnosis of aHUS between March 2010 and December 2015 at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center were enrolled...
April 7, 2017: Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28381151/omental-arteriopathy-in-primary-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#20
Natalie Ellington, Matthias T F Wolf, Jennifer Kasten, Dinesh Rakheja
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: International Journal of Surgical Pathology
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