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Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058212/complement-related-kidney-diseases-recurrence-after-transplantation
#1
REVIEW
Maurizio Salvadori, Elisabetta Bertoni
The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement...
December 24, 2016: World Journal of Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057640/murine-systemic-thrombophilia-and-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-from-a-factor-h-point-mutation
#2
Yoshiyasu Ueda, Imran Mohammed, Delu Song, Damodar Gullipalli, Lin Zhou, Sayaka Sato, Yuan Wang, Shuchi Gupta, Zhongjian Cheng, Hong Wang, Jialing Bao, Yingying Mao, Lawrence Brass, X Long Zheng, Takashi Miwa, Matthew Palmer, Joshua Dunaief, Wen-Chao Song
Complement plays a key role in host defense but its dysregulation can cause autologous tissue injury. Complement activation is normally controlled by regulatory proteins including factor H (FH) in plasma and membrane cofactor protein (MCP) on the cell surface. Mutations in FH and MCP are linked to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that causes renal failure in patients. We describe here that disruption of FH function on the cell surface can also lead to disseminated complement-dependent macrovascular thrombosis...
January 5, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056875/turkish-pediatric-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-registry-initial-analysis-of-146-patients
#3
Nesrin Besbas, Bora Gulhan, Oguz Soylemezoglu, Z Birsin Ozcakar, Emine Korkmaz, Mutlu Hayran, Fatih Ozaltin
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a devastating disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Its genetic heterogeneity impacts its clinical presentation, progress, and outcome, and there is no consensus on its clinical management. METHODS: To identify the characteristics of aHUS in Turkish children, an industry-independent registry was established for data collection that includes both retrospective and prospective patients. RESULTS: In total, 146 patients (62 boys, 84 girls) were enrolled; 53 patients (36...
January 5, 2017: BMC Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025630/adjustment-of-eculizumab-dosage-pattern-in-patients-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-with-suboptimal-response-to-standard-treatment-pattern
#4
Camino García Monteavaro, Carmen Peralta Roselló, Borja Quiroga, José María Baltar Martín, Lorena Castillo Eraso, Fernando de Álvaro Moreno, Alberto Martínez Vea, María Teresa Visus-Fernández de Manzanos
In patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), complement blocking by eculizumab rapidly halts the process of thrombotic microangiopathy and it is associated with clear long-term hematologic and renal improvements. Eculizumab treatment consists of a 4-week initial phase with weekly IV administration of 900 mg doses, followed by a maintenance phase with a 1,200 mg dose in the fifth week and every 14 ± 2 days thereafter. We present three patients with aHUS and suboptimal response to eculizumab treatment at the usual administration dosage who showed hematologic and renal improvements after an adjustment in the eculizumab treatment protocol...
2016: Case Reports in Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989322/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-and-c3-glomerulopathy-conclusions-from-a-kidney-disease-improving-global-outcomes-kdigo-controversies-conference
#5
Timothy H J Goodship, H Terence Cook, Fadi Fakhouri, Fernando C Fervenza, Véronique Frémeaux-Bacchi, David Kavanagh, Carla M Nester, Marina Noris, Matthew C Pickering, Santiago Rodríguez de Córdoba, Lubka T Roumenina, Sanjeev Sethi, Richard J H Smith
In both atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) complement plays a primary role in disease pathogenesis. Herein we report the outcome of a 2015 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference where key issues in the management of these 2 diseases were considered by a global panel of experts. Areas addressed included renal pathology, clinical phenotype and assessment, genetic drivers of disease, acquired drivers of disease, and treatment strategies. In order to help guide clinicians who are caring for such patients, recommendations for best treatment strategies were discussed at length, providing the evidence base underpinning current treatment options...
December 15, 2016: Kidney International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986662/a-pathogenic-role-of-complement-in-arterial-hypertension-and-hypertensive-end-organ-damage
#6
Ulrich O Wenzel, Marlies Bode, Jörg Köhl, Heimo Ehmke
The self-amplifying cascade of messenger and effector molecules of the complement system serves as a powerful danger sensing system that protects the host from a hostile microbial environment, while maintaining proper tissue and organ function through effective clearance of altered or dying cells. As an important effector arm of innate immunity it plays also important roles in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Innate and adaptive immune response have been identified as crucial players in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage...
December 16, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27977428/breaking-down-the-complement-system-a-review-and-update-on-novel-therapies
#7
Yuvaram N V Reddy, Andrew M Siedlecki, Jean M Francis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The complement system represents one of the more primitive forms of innate immunity. It has increasingly been found to contribute to pathologies in the native and transplanted kidney. We provide a concise review of the physiology of the complement cascade, and discuss current and upcoming complement-based therapies. RECENT FINDINGS: Current agents in clinical use either bind to complement components directly or prevent complement from binding to antibodies affixed to the endothelial surface...
December 12, 2016: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976568/an-unexpected-diagnostic-course-of-systemic-lupus-erythematosus
#8
Aysel Taktak, Adem Köksoy, Özge Başaran, Saba Kiremitçi, Banu Acar, Nermin Uncu, Nilgün Çakar
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TM), especially thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as a severe hematological involvement. However hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is seen less frequently in SLE, particularly as an initial presentation. Here we present a 15-year old boy presenting with gross hematuria, decreased urinary output and petechial lesions. He was diagnosed as atypical HUS according to the classical triad of TM, along with observation of hypocomplementemia and negative stool cultures...
2016: Turkish Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974740/a-case-report-and-literature-review-of-eculizumab-withdrawal-in-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#9
Borja Quiroga, Alberto de Lorenzo, Cristina Vega, Fernando de Alvaro
BACKGROUND Recent advances in the treatment of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) have resulted to better long-term survival rates for patients with this life-threatening disease. However, many questions remain such as whether or not long-term treatment is necessary in some patients and what are the risks of prolonged therapy. CASE REPORT Here, we discuss the case of a 37-year-old woman with CFH and CD46 genetic abnormalities who developed aHUS with severe renal failure. She was successfully treated with three doses of rituximab and a three month treatment with eculizumab...
December 15, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974406/thrombotic-microangiopathy-in-inverted-formin-2-mediated-renal-disease
#10
Rachel C Challis, Troels Ring, Yaobo Xu, Edwin K S Wong, Oliver Flossmann, Ian S D Roberts, Saeed Ahmed, Michael Wetherall, Giedrius Salkus, Vicky Brocklebank, Julian Fester, Lisa Strain, Valerie Wilson, Katrina M Wood, Kevin J Marchbank, Mauro Santibanez-Koref, Timothy H J Goodship, David Kavanagh
The demonstration of impaired C regulation in the thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) resulted in the successful introduction of the C inhibitor eculizumab into clinical practice. C abnormalities account for approximately 50% of aHUS cases; however, mutations in the non-C gene diacylglycerol kinase-ε have been described recently in individuals not responsive to eculizumab. We report here a family in which the proposita presented with aHUS but did not respond to eculizumab...
December 14, 2016: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27965669/complement-regulator-fhr-3-is-elevated-either-locally-or-systemically-in-a-selection-of-autoimmune-diseases
#11
Nicole Schäfer, Antje Grosche, Joerg Reinders, Stefanie M Hauck, Richard B Pouw, Taco W Kuijpers, Diana Wouters, Boris Ehrenstein, Volker Enzmann, Peter F Zipfel, Christine Skerka, Diana Pauly
The human complement factor H-related protein-3 (FHR-3) is a soluble regulator of the complement system. Homozygous cfhr3/1 deletion is a genetic risk factor for the autoimmune form of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS), while also found to be protective in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The precise function of FHR-3 remains to be fully characterized. We generated four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for FHR-3 (RETC) without cross-reactivity to the complement factor H (FH)-family. These antibodies detected FHR-3 from human serum with a mean concentration of 1 μg/mL...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959629/complement-dysregulation-and-disease-insights-from-contemporary-genetics
#12
M Kathryn Liszewski, Anuja Java, Elizabeth C Schramm, John P Atkinson
The vertebrate complement system consists of sequentially interacting proteins that provide for a rapid and powerful host defense. Nearly 60 proteins comprise three activation pathways (classical, alternative, and lectin) and a terminal cytolytic pathway common to all. Attesting to its potency, nearly half of the system's components are engaged in its regulation. An emerging theme over the past decade is that variations in these inhibitors predispose to two scourges of modern humans. One, occurring most often in childhood, is a rare but deadly thrombomicroangiopathy called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome...
December 5, 2016: Annual Review of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27951532/brief-review-and-a-clinical-case-of-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-associated-with-interferon-%C3%AE-treatment
#13
Sabrina Milan Manani, Grazia Maria Virzì, Fiorella Gastaldon, Marta Proglio, Alessandra Brocca, Claudio Ronco
The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathies and it consists of the triad of nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. The atypical form of HUS (aHUS) is related to causative mutations in complement genes. Some conditions act as a trigger for aHUS in individuals that have a genetic background predisposing to complement activation. Interferon β is a recombinant-protein therapy approved to treat multiple sclerosis (MS), and can be a causative agent in the occurrence of HUS through anti-angiogenic activity...
December 13, 2016: Blood Purification
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932477/moss-produced-glycosylation-optimized-human-factor-h-for-therapeutic-application-in-complement-disorders
#14
Stefan Michelfelder, Juliana Parsons, Lennard L Bohlender, Sebastian N W Hoernstein, Holger Niederkrüger, Andreas Busch, Nicola Krieghoff, Jonas Koch, Benjamin Fode, Andreas Schaaf, Thomas Frischmuth, Martin Pohl, Peter F Zipfel, Ralf Reski, Eva L Decker, Karsten Häffner
Genetic defects in complement regulatory proteins can lead to severe renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathies, and age-related macular degeneration. The majority of the mutations found in patients with these diseases affect the glycoprotein complement factor H, the main regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Therapeutic options are limited, and novel treatments, specifically those targeting alternative pathway activation, are highly desirable...
December 8, 2016: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932157/belatacept-and-eculizumab-for-treatment-of-calcineurin-inhibitor-induced-thrombotic-microangiopathy-after-kidney-transplantation-case-report
#15
J Merola, P S Yoo, J Schaub, J D Smith, M I Rodriguez-Davalos, E Tichy, D C Mulligan, W Asch, R Formica, M Kashgarian, S Kulkarni
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after kidney transplantation is an uncommon and challenging cause of graft dysfunction and is associated with early graft loss. An idiosyncratic endothelial reaction to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) has been implicated as a frequent cause of TMA. This reaction is marked by uncontrolled activation of complement and subsequent cellular destruction. Usual therapy consists of withdrawal of the inciting drug and plasmapheresis to minimize levels of circulating complement. Recently, eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement component C5, has been used for the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome...
November 2016: Transplantation Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930620/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-ahus-essential-aspects-of-an-accurate-diagnosis
#16
Jeffrey Laurence, Hermann Haller, Pier Mannuccio Mannucci, Masaomi Nangaku, Manuel Praga, Santiago Rodriguez de Cordoba
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), is a rare, life-threatening, systemic disease. When unrecognized or inappropriately treated, aHUS has a high degree of morbidity and mortality. aHUS results from chronic, uncontrolled activity of the alternative complement pathway, which activates platelets and damages the endothelium. Two-thirds of aHUS cases are associated with an identifiable complement-activating condition. aHUS is clinically very similar to the other major TMAs: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-HUS, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)...
November 2016: Clinical Advances in Hematology & Oncology: H&O
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929404/association-among-complement-factor-h-autoantibodies-deletions-of-cfhr-and-the-risk-of-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#17
Hong Jiang, Meng-Nan Fan, Min Yang, Chao Lu, Ming Zhang, Xiao-Hong Liu, Le Ma
To evaluate the association among complement factor H-related (CFHRs) gene deficiency, complement factor H (CFH) autoantibodies, and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) susceptibility. EMBASE, PubMed, and the ISI Web of Science databases were searched for all eligible studies on the relationship among CFHRs deficiency, anti-FH autoantibodies, and aHUS risk. Eight case-control studies with 927 cases and 1182 controls were included in this study. CFHR1 deficiency was significantly associated with an increased risk of aHUS (odds ratio (OR) = 3...
December 5, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913483/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#18
Vahid Afshar-Kharghan
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that affects multiple organs and the kidneys in particular. aHUS can be sporadic or familial and is most commonly caused by dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. The initial attack of aHUS can occur at any age, and is associated with a high rate of progression to end stage renal disease. Many aHUS patients relapse in the native or transplanted kidneys, and require close monitoring and long-term management. Availability of anticomplement therapy has revolutionized the management of aHUS, and can change the natural course of aHUS by inducing hematologic remission, improving or stabilizing kidney functions, and preventing graft failure...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904864/nephrotic-range-proteinuria-and-peripheral-edema-in-a-child-not-only-idiopathic-nephrotic-syndrome
#19
Valentina Dolcemascolo, Marina Vivarelli, Manuela Colucci, Francesca Diomedi-Camassei, Rossella Piras, Marta Alberti, Francesco Emma
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the simultaneous occurrence of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury due to thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) mainly occurring in renal and cerebral microvessels. Although the most common cause of HUS in children is Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, atypical forms in which Shiga toxin is not the trigger may occur. Research over the last few years has shown that complement dysregulation secondary to mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the regulation of the alternative pathway of complement account for most forms of atypical HUS (aHUS)...
September 2016: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848226/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-the-setting-of-complement-amplifying-conditions-case-reports-and-a-review-of-the-evidence-for-treatment-with-eculizumab
#20
REVIEW
Arif Asif, Ali Nayer, Christian S Haas
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, genetic, progressive, life-threatening form of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) predominantly caused by dysregulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. Complement-amplifying conditions (CACs), including pregnancy complications [preeclampsia, HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count) syndrome], malignant hypertension, autoimmune diseases, transplantation, and others, are associated with the onset of TMA in up to 69 % of cases of aHUS...
November 15, 2016: Journal of Nephrology
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