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Pediatric head injury

Zuzana Novak, Mary Aglipay, Nick Barrowman, Keith O Yeates, Miriam H Beauchamp, Jocelyn Gravel, Stephen B Freedman, Isabelle Gagnon, Gerard Gioia, Kathy Boutis, Emma Burns, Andrée-Anne Ledoux, Martin H Osmond, Roger L Zemek
Importance: Persistent postconcussion symptoms (PPCS) pose long-term challenges and can negatively affect patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To date, no large comprehensive study has addressed the association between PPCS and HRQoL. Objectives: To determine the association between HRQoL and PPCS at 4 weeks after concussion and assess the degree of impairment of HRQoL in the subsequent 12 weeks. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a prospective, multicenter cohort study (Predicting Persistent Postconcussive Problems in Pediatrics [5P]) from August 14, 2013, to September 30, 2014, children aged 5 to 18 years who presented to the emergency department within 48 hours after head injury and were considered to have an acute concussion were enrolled across 9 pediatric emergency departments within the Pediatric Emergency Research Canada Network...
October 24, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
Erhan Er, Şeref Kerem Çorbacıoğlu, Sertaç Güler, Şahin Aslan, Meltem Seviner, Gökhan Aksel, Burak Bekgöz
PURPOSE: Aimed to analyze demographical data and injury characteristics of patients who were injured in the Syrian Civil War (SCW) and to define differences in injury characteristics between adult and pediatric patients. METHODOLOGY: Patients who were injured in the SCW and transferred to our emergency department were retrospectively analyzed in this study during the 15-month period between July 2013 and October 2014. RESULTS: During the study period, 1591 patients who were the victims of the SCW and admitted to our emergency department due to war injury enrolled in the study...
October 6, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Ramesh Kumar, Frederic W B Deleyiannis, Corbett Wilkinson, Brent R O'Neill
OBJECTIVE The authors' goals in this study were to describe a series of dog attacks on children that required neurosurgical consultation and to better understand the pattern of injuries inflicted, the circumstances that place children at risk for attack, and the dog breeds involved. In addition, the authors review the surgical and medical management of these patients. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of all children requiring neurosurgical consultation for dog bite at a regional Level 1 pediatric trauma center over a 15-year period...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Cameron A Elliott, Vijay Ramaswamy, Francois D Jacob, Tejas Sankar, Vivek Mehta
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the test of choice to describe the extent of microstructural injury. CASE PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION: In this case series, we describe novel acute and chronic MRI findings in four infants (6-19 months) with small, unilateral subdural hematomas in whom the etiology of head injury was suspicious for non-accidental trauma (NAT)...
October 20, 2016: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Felipe P Andrade, Roberto Montoro, Renan Oliveira, Gabriela Loures, Luana Flessak, Roberta Gross, Camille Donnabella, Andrea Puchnick, Lisa Suzuki, Rodrigo Regacini
OBJECTIVES: 1) To verify clinical signs correlated with appropriate cranial computed tomography scan indications and changes in the therapeutic approach in pediatric minor head trauma scenarios. 2) To estimate the radiation exposure of computed tomography scans with low dose protocols in the context of trauma and the additional associated risk. METHODS: Investigators reviewed the medical records of all children with minor head trauma, which was defined as a Glasgow coma scale ≥13 at the time of admission to the emergency room, who underwent computed tomography scans during the years of 2013 and 2014...
October 1, 2016: Clinics
Manasi Hulyalkar, Stephen J Gleich, Rahul Kashyap, Amelia Barwise, Harsheen Kaur, Yue Dong, Lei Fan, Srinivas Murthy, Grace M Arteaga, Sandeep Tripathi
Increasing process complexity in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can lead to information overload resulting in missing pertinent information and potential errors during morning rounds. An efficient model using a novel electronic rounding tool was designed as part of a broader critical care decision support system-checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness and injury in pediatrics (CERTAINp). We aimed to evaluate its impact on improving the process of care during rounding. Prospective pre- and post-interventional data included: team performance baseline assessment, patient safety discussion, guideline adherence, rounding time, and a survey of Residents' and Nurses' perception using a Likert scale...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Omar N Pathmanaban, Kerry A Burke, Paul Leach, John Thorne, Ian D Kamaly-Asl
BACKGROUND: Positional plagiocephaly is the most common cause of cranial asymmetry. The underlying cause of Chiari-1 malformation has many possible theories, and anecdotally some pediatric neurosurgeons have had experience of severe cases of positional brachycephaly with Chiari-1. However, to date there have been no published cases linking non-synostotic plagiocephaly with Chiari-1 malformation. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 18-month-old boy presented with a head injury...
October 15, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Shujun Wang, Dawei Li, Chuanan Shen, Jiake Chai, Hongjuan Zhu, Yanlu Lin, Congying Liu
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess the epidemiological characteristics of pediatric burns in Beijing City. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of pediatric patients (n = 400) admitted to four burn centers in Beijing City between June 2010 and May 2011. Burn severity was determined according to total body surface area (TBSA) percentage and degree. Patients were followed up for one year. Multivariate analyses were carried out to determine the factors (burn etiology, time and place of injury, living conditions, hospital type, first-aid treatment methods, and parent/guardian knowledge of burns, educational level, occupation) affecting burn properties (severity and pigmentation/scar)...
October 18, 2016: BMC Pediatrics
Robert P Olympia, Robert Wilkinson, Jennifer Dunnick, Brendan J Dougherty, Debra Zauner
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to describe pediatric emergency department (ED) referrals from urgent care centers and to determine the percentage of referrals considered essential and serious. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted between April 2013 and April 2015 on patients younger than 21 years referred directly to an ED in central Pennsylvania from surrounding urgent care centers. Referrals were considered essential or serious based on investigations/procedures performed or medications/consultations received in the ED...
October 8, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Henry W Ortega, Heidi Vander Velden, Gary A Smith
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe grill-related injuries in pediatric patients seeking emergency treatment. METHODS: Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 1990 through 2009 were investigated. Sample weights were used to calculate national estimates. United States Census Bureau data were used to calculate injury rates per 100,000 individuals. Linear regression and computation of relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were performed...
October 8, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Jin Hee Jeong, Jin Hee Lee, Kyuseok Kim, Joong Eui Rhee, Tae Yun Kim, You Hwan Jo, Yu Jin Kim, Jae Hyuk Lee, Changwoo Kang, Soo Hoon Lee, Joonghee Kim, Chan Jong Park, Hyuksool Kwon
OBJECTIVE: Head injury in children is a common problem presenting to emergency departments, and cranial computed tomography scanning is the diagnostic standard for these patients. Several decision rules are used to determine whether computed tomography scans should be used; however, the use of computed tomography scans is often influenced by guardians' preference toward the scans. The objective of this study was to identify changes in guardian preference for minor head injuries after receiving an explanation based on the institutional clinical practice guideline...
December 2015: Clin Exp Emerg Med
Eugene T H Ek, Sophia K Paul, Robert N Hotchkiss
BACKGROUND: The role of elbow contracture release in the very young is unclear, with existing studies reporting conflicting results. This study evaluated the long-term results after open elbow contracture release in patients aged younger than 18 years. METHODS: Between 1994 and 2012, 32 patients underwent open elbow contracture release at a mean age of 13.8 years (range, 5-18 years), and their outcomes were reviewed. The primary cause was traumatic in 30 patients (4 radial head/neck fractures, 5 intra-articular distal humeral fractures, 11 extra-articular distal humeral fractures, 10 complex fracture-dislocations), and the mean time from the index injury to contracture release was 16...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Merritt D Kinon, Rani Nasser, Jonathan Nakhla, Rupen Desai, Jessica R Moreno, Reza Yassari, Carlos A Bagley
Pediatric emergency physicians must have a high clinical suspicion for atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AARS), particularly when a child presents with neck pain and an abnormal head posture without the ability to return to a neutral position. As shown in the neurosurgical literature, timely diagnosis and swift initiation of treatment have a greater chance of treatment success for the patient. However, timely treatment is complicated because torticollis can result from a variety of maladies, including: congenital abnormalities involving the C1-C2 joint or the surrounding supporting muscles and ligaments, central nervous system abnormalities, obstetric palsies from brachial plexus injuries, clavicle fractures, head and neck surgery, and infection...
October 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Hayaki Uchino, Akira Kuriyama, John Bruce, Grant Laing, Damian Clarke, George Oosthuizen
Dog bites are a major cause of injury, especially in the pediatric population. Common anatomic sites of dog bites on children are the peripheries and the head and neck. The torso is reportedly injured less frequently, and only 2 cases of intra-abdominal injury secondary to dog bites have been reported. We recently encountered a 3-year-old boy presenting with peritonitis who had sustained multiple dog bites to his trunk and upper limbs. Emergency laparotomy was performed. Surgical findings revealed penetration of the peritoneum and single perforation of the anterior gastric wall with multiple tooth marks; thus, the gastric perforation was debrided and repaired...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Ruchi Kaushik, Isabelle M Krisch, Darrell R Schroeder, Randall Flick, Michael E Nemergut
BACKGROUND: Head injuries are the leading cause of death among cyclists, 85 % of which can be prevented by wearing a bicycle helmet. This study aims to estimate the incidence of pediatric bicycle-related injuries in Olmsted County and assess differences in injuries between those wearing helmets vs. not. METHODS: Olmsted County, Minnesota residents 5 to 18 years of age with a diagnostic code consistent with an injury associated with the use of a bicycle between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2011, were identified...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Paige A Culotta, James E Crowe, Quynh-Anh Tran, Jeremy Y Jones, Amy R Mehollin-Ray, H Brandon Tran, Marcella Donaruma-Kwoh, Cristina T Dodge, Elizabeth A Camp, Andrea T Cruz
BACKGROUND: Young children with suspected abusive head trauma often receive skull radiographs to evaluate for fractures as well as computed tomography (CT) of the head to assess for intracranial injury. Using a CT as the primary modality to evaluate both fracture and intracranial injury could reduce exposure to radiation without sacrificing performance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sensitivity of CT head with (3-D) reconstruction compared to skull radiographs to identify skull fractures in children with suspected abusive head trauma...
October 15, 2016: Pediatric Radiology
Ashley Blanchard, Keven I Cabrera, Nathan Kuppermann, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the prevalence of and adverse outcomes caused by pneumocephali in children with minor blunt head trauma who had no other intracranial injuries (ie, isolated pneumocephali). METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a public use dataset from a multicenter prospective study of pediatric minor head trauma. We included children younger than 18 years with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and non-trivial mechanisms of injury who had cranial computed tomographies obtained...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Thor S Stead, Vaibhav Rastogi, Vishnumurthy S Hedna, Latha Ganti
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to: 1) estimate the penetrance (in terms of youth coaches being aware of them) of the CDC "Heads Up!" guidelines, 2) determine whether these guidelines changed the coaches' practice, and 3) understand whether these guidelines resulted in a perceived decrease in the number of concussions. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey of pediatric sports coaches in the United States designed to assess the impact of the CDC "Heads Up!" GUIDELINES: "Heads Up!" Concussion in Youth Sports is a free, online course available to coaches, parents, and others helping to keep athletes safe from concussions...
August 29, 2016: Curēus
Kenneth Chin, Scott H Kozin, Martin Herman, Bernard D Horn, Craig P Eberson, Donald S Bae, Joshua M Abzug
Monteggia fracture-dislocations typically involve a dislocation of the radial head with an associated fracture of the ulnar shaft. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of these acute injuries result in excellent outcomes. Unfortunately, a Monteggia fracture-dislocation is often missed during diagnostic testing and results in a chronic Monteggia fracture-dislocation. The subsequent timing and treatment of chronic Monteggia fracture-dislocations are debatable because outcomes are suboptimal. Therefore, it is critical that the initial injury be correctly diagnosed and treated as close to the time of injury as possible to ensure excellent outcomes...
February 15, 2016: Instructional Course Lectures
Nathan Vaughan, Jeff Tweed, Cynthia Greenwell, David M Notrica, Crystal S Langlais, Shawn D St Peter, Charles M Leys, Daniel J Ostlie, R Todd Maxson, Todd Ponsky, David W Tuggle, James W Eubanks, Amina Bhatia, Cynthia Greenwell, Nilda M Garcia, Karla A Lawson, Prasenjeet Motghare, Robert W Letton, Adam C Alder
INTRODUCTION: Obesity is an epidemic in the pediatric population. Childhood obesity in trauma has been associated with increased incidence of long-bone fractures, longer ICU stays, and decreased closed head injuries. We investigated for differences in the likelihood of failure of non-operative management (NOM), and injury grade using a subset of a multi-institutional, prospective database of pediatric patients with solid organ injury (SOI). METHODS: We prospectively collected data on all pediatric patients (<18years) admitted for liver or splenic injury from September 2013 to January 2016...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
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