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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910735/birth-of-the-cool-a-two-centuries-decline-in-emotional-expression-in-anglophone-fiction
#1
Olivier Morin, Alberto Acerbi
The presence of emotional words and content in stories has been shown to enhance a story's memorability, and its cultural success. Yet, recent cultural trends run in the opposite direction. Using the Google Books corpus, coupled with two metadata-rich corpora of Anglophone fiction books, we show a decrease in emotionality in English-speaking literature starting plausibly in the nineteenth century. We show that this decrease cannot be explained by changes unrelated to emotionality (such as demographic dynamics concerning age or gender balance, changes in vocabulary richness, or changes in the prevalence of literary genres), and that, in our three corpora, the decrease is driven almost entirely by a decline in the proportion of positive emotion-related words, while the frequency of negative emotion-related words shows little if any decline...
December 2, 2016: Cognition & Emotion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27902497/service-providers-attitudes-toward-athletes-with-eating-disorders
#2
Siobhain McArdle, Mary M Meade, Emma Burrows
OBJECTIVE: This study explored the nature and extent of Athlete Support Personnel's (ASP's) attitudes and beliefs toward athletes with symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) compared with those with symptoms of depression. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with a survey instrument. SETTING: Sport and Exercise Science Professional Bodies and Associations in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and mainland United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-two ASP...
November 29, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896390/-assisted-suicide-in-the-movies-what-is-not-shown
#3
Kurt W Schmidt
Whereas changes to the existing legal situation regarding assisted suicide have been a topic of controversial debate in Germany for the last few years, this issue has long been of interest for international film-makers. Since the mid-1980s, the theme of assisted suicide has repeatedly been taken up by cinema, predominantly as central to a relationship drama. A sick person asks somebody close to them for help. Often this somebody is a physician or a nurse, ultimately an obvious way of solving the practical problem of how the assistant is to gain access to a lethal substance...
November 28, 2016: Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894031/artificial-placenta-analysis-of-recent-progress
#4
REVIEW
Stephen D Bird
The artificial placenta (AP) has for many decades captured the imagination of scientists and authors with popular fiction including The Matrix and Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World", depicting a human surviving ex-utero in an artificial uterine environment (AUE). For scientists this has fascinated as a way forward for extremely preterm infants (EPIs) born less than 28 weeks of gestation. Early successes with mechanical ventilation (MV) for infants born above 28 weeks of gestation meant that AP research lost momentum...
November 11, 2016: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893344/from-hallucination-to-fiction-the-invention-of-meaning-in-psychosis
#5
Silvia Lippi, Célia Lehaire, Laetitia Petit
Taking their inspiration from a case history, the authors explore the effects of a writing workshop led by a professional writer for patients in a psychiatric hospital. This workshop allowed different modes of transference to unfold: transference to the analyst-therapist, transference to the writer who led the workshop, and transference to the other members of the group. The writing activity created conditions in which there could be a movement from hallucination to delusion-a delusion expressed in fiction through the act of writing...
December 2016: Psychoanalytic Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890444/t2-weighted-cardiovascular-magnetic-resonance-imaging-to-delineate-ischemic-myocardium-at-risk-fact-or-fiction
#6
Thomas Stiermaier, Holger Thiele, Ingo Eitel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 24, 2016: Revista Española de Cardiología
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887771/microbiological-research-under-the-nagoya-protocol-facts-and-fiction
#7
Jörg Overmann, Amber Hartman Scholz
The Nagoya Protocol is based on concepts of biological diversity that are hardly applicable to microorganisms. Because of this incongruence, the Nagoya Protocol threatens future microbial research, potentially defeating its original purpose. Countries with appropriate regulations can promote science and their bioeconomy through international collaboration and simultaneously gain a competitive advantage.
November 22, 2016: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887034/epicurus-and-b-f-skinner-in-search-of-the-good-life
#8
Allen Neuringer, Walter Englert
This paper examines similarities in the works of Epicurus, an ancient Greek philosopher, and B. F. Skinner, a behavioral psychologist. They both were empiricists who argued in favor of the lawfulness of behavior while maintaining that random events were included within those laws. They both devoted much effort to describing how individuals could live effective, rewarding and pleasurable lives. They both emphasized simple and natural pleasures (or reinforcers) and the importance of combining personal pleasures with actions that benefit friends and community...
November 25, 2016: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885038/design-fiction-and-the-medical-humanities
#9
Christopher Gordon Strachan
This paper sets out to explore the similarities between the developing discipline of speculative and critical design (SCD) and science fiction, and their relevance to the medical humanities. SCD looks beyond 'commercial design' to consider what sort of things we should, or should not, be designing in order to create preferable futures. It does so by extrapolating from current social, economic, political and scientific knowledge, designing artefacts, experiences and scenarios which communicate futures and alternative realities in tangible ways...
December 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885037/the-psychologist-the-psychoanalyst-and-the-extraordinary-child-in-postwar-british-science-fiction
#10
Laura Tisdall
A sudden influx of portrayals of 'extraordinary children' emerged in British science fiction after the Second World War. Such children both violated and confirmed the new set of expectations about ordinary childhood that emerged from the findings of developmental psychologists around the same time. Previous work on extraordinary children in both science fiction and horror has tended to confine the phenomenon to an 'evil child boom' within the American filmmaking industry in the 1970s. This article suggests that a much earlier trend is visible in British postwar science fiction texts, analysing a cluster of novels that emerged in the 1950s: Arthur C...
December 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885036/visionary-medicine-speculative-fiction-racial-justice-and-octavia-butler-s-bloodchild
#11
John Carlo Pasco, Camille Anderson, Sayantani DasGupta
Medical students across the USA have increasingly made the medical institution a place for speculating racially just futures. From die-ins in Fall 2014 to silent protests in response to racially motivated police brutality, medical schools have responded to the public health crisis that is racial injustice in the USA. Reading science fiction may benefit healthcare practitioners who are already invested in imagining a more just, healthier futurity. Fiction that rewrites the future in ways that undermine contemporary power regimes has been termed 'visionary fiction'...
December 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885035/science-fiction-and-the-medical-humanities
#12
Gavin Miller, Anna McFarlane
Research on science fiction within the medical humanities should articulate interpretative frameworks that do justice to medical themes within the genre. This means challenging modes of reading that encourage unduly narrow accounts of science fiction. Admittedly, science studies has moved away from reading science fiction as a variety of scientific popularisation and instead understands science fiction as an intervention in the technoscientific imaginary that calls for investment in particular scientific enterprises, including various biomedical technologies...
December 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875121/nikola-tesla-why-was-he-so-much-resisted-and-forgotten-retrospectroscope
#13
Max E Valentinuzzi, Martin Hill Ortiz, Daniel Cervantes, Ron S Leder
Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories...
November 2016: IEEE Pulse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27868365/the-salience-of-the-self-self-referential-processing-and-internalizing-problems-in-children-and-adolescents-with-autism-spectrum-disorder
#14
Catherine A Burrows, Lauren V Usher, Peter C Mundy, Heather A Henderson
Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate atypical processing of, and memory for, self-referenced information, which may contribute to the heightened rates of co-occurring internalizing problems. We assessed affective and cognitive aspects of self-referential processing in verbally-fluent children with ASD (N = 79), and an age-matched comparison sample (COM, N = 73) of children without an autism diagnosis. We examined group differences in these two aspects of the self-system, and their joint contributions to individual differnces in internalizing problems...
November 20, 2016: Autism Research: Official Journal of the International Society for Autism Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863341/physical-constraints-on-the-non-dimensional-absorption-coefficients-of-compressional-and-shear-waves-for-viscoelastic-cylinders
#15
F G Mitri, Z E A Fellah
BACKGROUND: Normalized absorption coefficients for the longitudinal and shear waves in viscoelastic (polymer-type) materials, extracted from non-fictional experimental data showed anomalous effects, such as the generation of a negative radiation force (NRF) in plane progressive waves, negative energy absorption and extinction efficiencies and a scattering enhancement, not in agreement with energy conservation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work is directed towards analyzing those anomalies from the standpoint of energy conservation...
February 2017: Ultrasonics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856514/the-subjective-cut-sex-reassignment-surgery-in-1960s-and-1970s-science-fiction
#16
Karin Sellberg
This article considers the way in which ethical concerns about sex reassignment surgery and especially the research and clinical practice of the sexologist Dr John Money (1921-2006) is being negotiated in the 1960s and 1970s novels Myra Breckinridge and Myron by Gore Vidal and The Passion of New Eve by Angela Carter. Drawing on the theories of gender and embodiment developed by Money, the article reads the novels as a critical response and discursive interaction with emergent sexological concepts.
November 17, 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852344/neuroscience-fiction-as-eidol%C3%A3-social-reflection-and-neuroethical-obligations-in-depictions-of-neuroscience-in-film
#17
Rachel Wurzman, David Yaden, James Giordano
Neuroscience and neurotechnology are increasingly being employed to assess and alter cognition, emotions, and behaviors, and the knowledge and implications of neuroscience have the potential to radically affect, if not redefine, notions of what constitutes humanity, the human condition, and the "self." Such capability renders neuroscience a compelling theme that is becoming ubiquitous in literary and cinematic fiction. Such neuro-SciFi (or "NeuroS/F") may be seen as eidolá: a created likeness that can either accurately-or superficially, in a limited way-represent that which it depicts...
November 17, 2016: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27849667/unintended-consequences-of-the-30-day-mortality-metric-fact-or-fiction
#18
Winta T Mehtsun, Keith D Lillemoe, Jie Zheng, E John Orav, Ashish K Jha
OBJECTIVE: To assess if an incongruous increase in mortality occurs after postoperative day 30. BACKGROUND: In the current climate of public reporting and pay-for-performance, 30-day mortality after inpatient surgery has become a key metric to assess performance. Whereas the intent is to improve quality, there has been increasing concern that reporting 30-day mortality may influence providers' timing of treatment withdrawal. METHODS: We used national Medicare data to identify beneficiaries who underwent 1 of 19 major surgical procedures...
November 15, 2016: Annals of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27836927/l-ron-hubbard-s-science-fiction-quest-against-psychiatry
#19
Laura Hirshbein
Layfayette Ronald Hubbard (1911-1986) was a colourful and prolific American writer of science fiction in the 1930s and 1940s. During the time between his two decades of productivity and his return to science fiction in 1980, Hubbard founded the Church of Scientology. In addition to its controversial status as a religion and its troubling pattern of intimidation and litigation directed towards its foes, Scientology is well known as an organised opponent to psychiatry. This paper looks at Hubbard's science fiction work to help understand the evolution of Scientology's antipsychiatry stance, as well as the alternative to psychiatry offered by Hubbard...
November 11, 2016: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832454/a-tale-of-two-biographies-the-myth-and-truth-of-barbara-mcclintock
#20
Esha Shah
Evelyn Fox Keller wrote first biography of the Nobel Prize winning geneticist Barbara McClintock in which Keller discussed how McClintock felt being rejected by her peers in the 1950s because she questioned the dominant idea of the particulate gene and instead proposed that the genetic material jumped positions on the chromosome which indicated that the gene did not control but was controlled by the cellular environment. Keller's story of McClintock's life is an account of a woman scientist's conception of science and how her unorthodox views isolated her from the main stream science...
December 2016: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences
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