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organizational psychology

Jonathan Delman, Vanessa V Klodnick
Peer providers are a promising practice for transition-age youth community mental health treatment engagement and support, yet little is known about the experience of being a young adult peer provider or what helps to make an individual in this role successful. Utilizing a capital theory lens, this study uses data from focus groups (two with young adult peer providers and two with their supervisors) to examine facilitators of young adult peer provider success in community mental health treatment settings. Eight factors were identified as critical to young adult peer provider on-the-job success: persistence, job confidence, resilience, job training, skilled communications with colleagues, regular and individualized supervision, support from colleagues, and family support...
October 22, 2016: Community Mental Health Journal
Anshu K Jain, Mary L Fennell, Anees B Chagpar, Hannah K Connolly, Ingrid M Nembhard
Effective communication is a requirement in the teamwork necessary for improved coordination to deliver patient-centered, value-based cancer care. Communication is particularly important when care providers are geographically distributed or work across organizations. We review organizational and teams research on communication to highlight psychological safety as a key determinant of high-quality communication within teams. We first present the concept of psychological safety, findings about its communication effects for teamwork, and factors that affect it...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Oncology Practice
Arnold B Bakker, Evangelia Demerouti
The job demands-resources (JD-R) model was introduced in the international literature 15 years ago (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001). The model has been applied in thousands of organizations and has inspired hundreds of empirical articles, including 1 of the most downloaded articles of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (Bakker, Demerouti, & Euwema, 2005). This article provides evidence for the buffering role of various job resources on the impact of various job demands on burnout...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Fumiaki Taka, Kyoko Nomura, Saki Horie, Keisuke Takemoto, Masumi Takeuchi, Shinichi Takenoshita, Aya Murakami, Haruko Hiraike, Hiroko Okinaga, Derek R Smith
We investigated relationships between the perception of organizational climate with gender equity and psychological health among 94 women and 211 men in a Japanese private university in 2015 using the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (i.e., personal, work-related and student-related burnout). Perceptions of organizational climate with respect to gender equity were measured with two scales including organizational engagement with a gender equal society in the workplace (consisting of three domains of 'Women utilization', 'Organizational promotion of gender equal society' and 'Consultation service'); and a gender inequality in academia scale that had been previously developed...
October 1, 2016: Industrial Health
Sarah E Crozier, Catherine M Cassell
: The use of longitudinal methodology as a means of capturing the intricacies in complex organizational phenomena is well documented, and many different research strategies for longitudinal designs have been put forward from both a qualitative and quantitative stance. This study explores a specific emergent qualitative methodology, audio diaries, and assesses their utility for work psychology research drawing on the findings from a four-stage study addressing transient working patterns and stress in UK temporary workers...
June 2016: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Alexis Descatha, Alice Huynh Tuong, Pierre Coninx, Michel Baer, Thomas Loeb, Thomas Despréaux
In massive catastrophic events, occupational health practitioners are more and more frequently involved in the management of such situations. We aim to describe the multiple aspects of the role that occupational health practitioners might play, by focusing on the recent example of the Paris terrorist attack of November 2015. During and after the Paris attack, occupational practitioners, in collaboration with emergency and security professionals, were involved in psychological care, assembling information, follow-up, return-to-work, and improving in-company safety plans...
2016: Frontiers in Public Health
Angela Huttner, Marina Cacace, Luciano d'Andrea, Chrysanthi Skevaki, Dan Otelea, Francesca Pugliese, Evelina Tacconelli
OBJECTIVES: In this qualitative study we explore the social, cultural, psychological, and organizational factors associated with inequality in the workplace among clinical microbiologists (CM) and infectious disease (ID) specialists in European hospitals. METHODS: We analysed data from 52 interviews and five focus groups involving 82 CM/ID specialists selected from university, research or community hospitals in five countries, one each in Northern, Western, Eastern, Southeastern, and Southwestern Europe...
September 28, 2016: Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Martin Hua, Tristan Boonstra, Patrick J Kelly, Andrew Wilson, Jonathan C Craig, Angela C Webster
OBJECTIVES: The Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) makes recommendations to the Australian Government for funding health technologies under the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS). Differences in public, clinical, commercial, and political opinions on health expenditure emphasize the importance of defensible funding decisions. We aimed to evaluate the quality of health technology assessment (HTA) reports over time and among health technologies assessed for MSAC. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A cohort study was performed of HTA reports prepared for MSAC between 1998 and 2013...
October 3, 2016: International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care
Christopher M Barnes, Jared A Miller, Sophie Bostock
Drawing from recent research advances indicating the harmful effects of insomnia on negative affect, job satisfaction, self-control, organizational citizenship behavior, and interpersonal deviance, we hypothesized that treating insomnia with Internet based cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia would lead to improvements in these outcomes. In a field experiment with a randomized wait-list control group, we found that treatment had a beneficial direct effect on negative affect, job satisfaction, and self-control...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Applied Psychology
M L Omholt, T H Tveito, C Ihlebæk
BACKGROUND: The European civilian aviation industry has undergone major changes in the last decade. Despite this, there is little knowledge about work-related stress and subjective health complaints (SHCs) affecting Norwegian aircrew. AIMS: To investigate the relationships between work-related stress, self-efficacy and SHCs in commercial aircrew in Norway and to explore differences between cockpit and cabin crew. METHODS: Aircrew members from the three major airlines operating from Norway completed an electronically distributed questionnaire...
September 28, 2016: Occupational Medicine
Roberta Meneses Oliveira, Lucilane Maria Sales da Silva, Maria Vilani Cavalcante Guedes, Adriana Catarina de Souza Oliveira, Rosario Gómez Sánchez, Raimundo Augusto Martins Torres
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the concept of disruptive behavior in healthcare work. METHOD: An integrative review carried out in the theoretical phase of a qualitative research substantiated by the theoretical framework of the Hybrid Model of Concept Development. The search for articles was conducted in the CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, PubMed and SciVerse Scopus databases in 2013. RESULTS: 70 scientific articles answered the guiding question and lead to attributes of disruptive behavior, being: incivility, psychological violence and physical/sexual violence; with their main antecedents (intrapersonal, interpersonal and organizational) being: personality characteristics, stress and work overload; and consequences of: workers' moral/mental distress, compromised patient safety, labor loss, and disruption of communication, collaboration and teamwork...
July 2016: Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da U S P
S T Chan, P C B Khong, W Wang
AIM: To provide an overview of healthcare professionals' psychological responses, coping strategies and supporting needs in the aftermath of an adverse event, thus informing health policy implications and future research in this aspect. BACKGROUND: Trauma experienced by healthcare professionals as second victims potentially provokes intense emotional distress, detrimental professional outcomes and imposes harsh long-term effects. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed to synthesize the experiences and needs of second victims who are healthcare professionals being traumatized by an unanticipated adverse event, medical error or patient-related injury...
September 28, 2016: International Nursing Review
Bin Zhou, Ernst Pöppel, Lingyan Wang, Taoxi Yang, Yuliya Zaytseva, Yan Bao
UNLABELLED: Single cases may lead to unexpected hypotheses in psychology. We retrospectively analyzed single case studies that suggested organizational principles along the early visual pathway, which have remained unanswered until now. FIRST CASE: In spite of the inhomogeneity of sensitivity, paradoxically the visual field on the subjective level appears to be homogeneous; constancy of brightness of supra-threshold stimuli throughout the visual field is claimed to be responsible for homogeneity; specific summation properties of retinal ganglion cells are hypothesized to guarantee this effect...
September 2016: PsyCh Journal
WonYang Kang, Won-Ju Park, Keun-Ho Jang, Hyeong-Min Lim, Ji-Sung Ann, Seung-Hyeon Cho, Jai-Dong Moon
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether type of work is associated with anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Additionally, we investigated the impact of number of working hours on anxiety and depression. METHODS: A total of 1774 workers participated and completed the HADS to determine their levels of anxiety and depression. All subjects were employed at one of two manufacturing plants for the same company...
2016: Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Katia Noyes, John R T Monson, Irfan Rizvi, Ann Savastano, James S A Green, Nick Sevdalis
Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Oncology Practice
Michael C Roberts
This article reflects on service contributions upon receiving the 2016 Society of Pediatric Psychology Wright Ross Salk Distinguished Service Award. As the title implies, worker bees make service contributions for the overall benefit of the hive and colony. So too, the scientific discipline, clinical profession, and the Society of Pediatric Psychology need the service contributions of multiple individuals to survive and thrive. Many people have made professional contributions to benefit the field and its organizational home; many more worker bees will volunteer in the future to fill important service roles and sustain the hive...
November 2016: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Francesco Marini, Carlo A Marzi
The visual system leverages organizational regularities of perceptual elements to create meaningful representations of the world. One clear example of such function, which has been formalized in the Gestalt psychology principles, is the perceptual grouping of simple visual elements (e.g., lines and arcs) into unitary objects (e.g., forms and shapes). The present study sought to characterize automatic attentional capture and related cognitive processing of Gestalt-like visual stimuli at the psychophysiological level by using event-related potentials (ERPs)...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Todd M Sabato, Tanis J Walch, Dennis J Caine
This article presents a current review of the risk of physical and psychological injury associated with participation in elite youth sport, and suggests strategies to ensure the physical and emotional health of these young athletes. Although there is lack of epidemiological data, especially with regard to psychological injury, preliminary data suggest that the risk of injury is high in this population. While there is lack of incident and follow-up data, there is also concern regarding burnout, disordered eating, and the long-term consequences of injury...
2016: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine
Allyson Mary Davys, Michael O'Connell, Janet May, Beverley Burns
The evaluation of professional supervision has been a focus for discussion in the supervision literature over past decades. A review of the literature in this area, however, suggests that evaluation has been differently defined, variously addressed, and a range of outcomes reported. The present study reports the findings of the first stage of a three-stage study of evaluation in professional supervision in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Experienced practitioners from the four professions of counselling, mental health nursing, psychology, and social work were interviewed to explore how evaluation in professional supervision is understood and actioned in practice...
September 12, 2016: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Junya Fujino, Shinsuke Fujimoto, Fumitoshi Kodaka, Colin F Camerer, Ryosaku Kawada, Kosuke Tsurumi, Shisei Tei, Masanori Isobe, Jun Miyata, Genichi Sugihara, Makiko Yamada, Hidenao Fukuyama, Toshiya Murai, Hidehiko Takahashi
The sunk cost effect, an interesting and well-known maladaptive behavior, is pervasive in real life, and thus has been studied in various disciplines, including economics, psychology, organizational behavior, politics, and biology. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the sunk cost effect have not been clearly established, nor have their association with differences in individual susceptibility to the effect. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural responses induced by sunk costs along with measures of core human personality...
2016: Scientific Reports
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