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Shortness of breath

Robert E Kelly, Robert J Obermeyer, Donald Nuss
BACKGROUND: Recently, technical improvement in the ability to measure lung function and the severity of chest deformity have enabled progress in understanding the mechanism of limitations of lung function in pectus excavatum. METHODS: After establishing that most patients with pectus excavatum do have symptoms of exercise intolerance, easy fatigability, and shortness of breath with exertion, lung function has been evaluated by a variety of methods in different centers...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Ankit Mangla, Nikki Agarwal, Chou Carmel, Thomas Lad
Erlotinib is one of the most widely used tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor. Since its introduction, it has revolutionized the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Skin rashes and diarrhea are the most often reported side effects of erlotinib however it is also associated with interstitial pneumonitis or interstitial lung disease, which often turns out to be fatal complication of using this medicine. Though reported scarcely in the western world, the association of interstitial lung disease with epidermal growth factor receptor has attracted a lot of attention in the recent times...
September 5, 2016: Rare Tumors
Patricia D Freitas, Palmira G Ferreira, Aline G Silva, Rafael Stelmach, Regina M Carvalho-Pinto, Frederico L A Fernandes, Marcio C Mancini, Maria N Sato, Milton A Martins, Celso R F Carvalho
RATIONALE: Clinical control is difficult to achieve in obese patients with asthma. Bariatric surgery has been recommended for weight-loss and to improve asthma control; however, the benefits of nonsurgical interventions have been poorly investigated. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of exercise training in a weight-loss program on asthma control, quality of life, inflammatory biomarkers and lung function. METHODS: Fifty-five obese patients with asthma were randomly assigned to either a weight-loss program + exercise (WL+E group, n=28) or a weight-loss program + sham (WL+S group, n=27) group, where the weight-loss program included nutrition (caloric restriction) and psychological therapies...
July 19, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Federico Antenora, Riccardo Fantini, Andrea Iattoni, Ivana Castaniere, Antonia Sdanganelli, Francesco Livrieri, Roberto Tonelli, Stefano Zona, Marco Monelli, Enrico M Clini, Alessandro Marchioni
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The prevalence and clinical consequences of diaphragmatic dysfunction (DD) during acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) remain unknown. The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate the prevalence of DD as assessed by ultrasonography (US) and (ii) to report the impact of DD on non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) failure, length of hospital stay and mortality in severe AECOPD admitted to respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). METHODS: Forty-one consecutive AECOPD patients with respiratory acidosis admitted over a 12-month period to the RICU of the University Hospital of Modena were studied...
October 14, 2016: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
Praful Schroff, Jason Hitchcock, Christopher Schumann, J Michael Wells, Mark T Dransfield, Surya P Bhatt
Rationale Current practice guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation as an adjunct to standard pharmacologic therapy for individuals with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether pulmonary rehabilitation benefits all subjects with COPD independent of baseline disease burden is not known. Objective To test whether pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with COPD independent of baseline exercise capacity, dyspnea and lung function. Methods Data from a prospectively maintained database of participants with COPD enrolled in pulmonary rehabilitation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham from 1996 to 2013 was retrospectively analyzed...
October 14, 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Ajay U Mahajan, Deepak S Laddhad, Deepak Bohara, Sangeeta D Laddhad, Yogita T Dinde, Sachin S Bhabad
A 32 yrs old man presented with shortness of breath and syncopal episode with preceding history of DVT 15days above. Patient has tachycardia hypoxia and hypotension, on evaluation ECG Showed S1 Q3 T3 Pattern, bedside Echo Showed visible thrombus of 3cm in pulmonary artery, successfully thrombolysed with tenecteplase and streptokinase. This case study is presented to stress importance of urgent bedside echo in all sudden onset dysponea and hypoxia to rule out pulmonary Embolism which can be successfully thrombolysed without delay...
June 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Noman Ahmed Jang Khan, Masroor A Khan, Guillermo Juan Morell Chardon
End stage renal disease has a list of consequences, cardiovascular being the most common. Inefficient dialysis can cause significant deposition of calcium all over the body, including heart valves making heart function impaired. We illustrate a case of 38-year-old female with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient had been complaining of pain and swelling of the right hand for the last few months and had been seen by hand surgeon and was admitted electively for the biopsy of hand lesions...
2016: Case Reports in Cardiology
Mohanjeet Kaur, Akashdeep Singh, Shobhit Bansal, Gurpreet S Wander
Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis (UPAA) is a rare congenital anomaly due to a malformation of the sixth aortic arch of the affected side during embryogenesis. It can occur in isolation or may be associated with other congenital cardiovascular malformations. The diagnosis is usually set at adolescence, however it can remain asymptomatic and late diagnosis is possible. Recurrent pulmonary infections, decreased exercise tolerance, and shortness of breath on exertion are the most common symptoms.
April 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Sermed Mezher, Mariam Rahm, Sunanda Sudarsanan, Surendran Chandrasekaran
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Global Pediatric Health
Marcela De La Hoz Polo, Monica Khanna, Miny Walker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 11, 2016: Skeletal Radiology
Christian Guilleminault, Shehlanoor Huseni, Lauren Lo
A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs...
July 2016: ERJ Open Research
Jonathan F Arnold, Melissa Roscum
INTRODUCTION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is defined as breathing 100% oxygen at a pressure ≥1.4 atmospheres absolute (ATA). Adjunct HBOT is one modality used for treatment of certain complex wounds. The resulting increase in oxygen delivery to wounded tissue has been associated with reduced edema, reduced inflammation, improved infection control, increased collagen deposition, and increased angiogenesis. However, there remains a relative paucity of evidence supporting the use of HBOT in the treatment of certain acute and chronic, non-healing wounds...
October 10, 2016: Surgical Technology International
Katherine Lambe, Judy Currey, Julie Considine
BACKGROUND: Understanding of clinical deterioration of emergency department patients is rapidly evolving. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and nature of vital sign collection and clinical deterioration in emergency care. METHODS: A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from the records of 200 randomly selected adults with presenting complaints of abdominal pain, shortness of breath, chest pain and febrile illness from 1 January to 31 December 2014 at a 22 bed emergency department in Melbourne, Australia...
October 7, 2016: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal: AENJ
Joakim Öhlén, Lara Russell, Cecilia Håkanson, Anette Alvariza, Carl Johan Fürst, Kristofer Årestedt, Richard Sawatzky
CONTEXT: Symptom relief is a key goal of palliative care. There is a need to consider complexities in symptom relief patterns for groups of people in order to understand and evaluate symptom relief as an indicator of quality of care at end of life. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to distinguish classes of patients who have different symptom relief patterns during the last week of life and to identify predictors of these classes in an adult register population...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Craig Steinmaus, Catterina Ferreccio, Johanna Acevedo, John R Balmes, Jane Liaw, Patricia Troncoso, David C Dauphiné, Anthony Nardone, Allan H Smith
BACKGROUND: Arsenic in drinking water has been associated with increases in lung disease, but information on the long-term impacts of early-life exposure or moderate exposure levels are limited. METHODS: We investigated pulmonary disease and lung function in 795 subjects from three socio-demographically similar areas in northern Chile: Antofagasta, which had a well-described period of high arsenic water concentrations (860μg/L) from 1958 to 1970; Iquique, which had long-term arsenic water concentrations near 60μg/L; and Arica, with long-term water concentrations ≤10μg/L...
October 7, 2016: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Tony S Brar, Neeka Akhavan
This is a 78 year old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease (CAD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hypertension (HTN), and gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD) who presented to the emergency room with worsening shortness of breath (SOB) and low-grade fevers for one week prior to admission. He was originally diagnosed with healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) and an acute on chronic COPD exacerbation and treated with prednisone, inhalers, ipratropium/albuterol, and broad-spectrum antibiotics...
2016: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
Muhammad Abdul Mabood Khalil, Muhammad Salman Ghazni, Jackson Tan, Nazish Naseer, Muhammad Ashhad Ullah Khalil
Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) was first described in 1960. It may occur as a complication of gonadotropin hormone therapy during assisted pregnancy or for primary infertility. A 26-year-old female patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome and primary infertility was treated to conceive. She received intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) along with follicle-stimulating hormone in an outside private clinic. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal and chest pain, loose stool, vomiting, shortness of breath and decreasing urine output...
May 2016: Case Reports in Gastroenterology
Jirakrit Leelarungrayub, Decha Pinkaew, Khanittha Wonglangka, Wichai Eungpinichpong, Jakkrit Klaphajone
Although previously proposed that chronic scleroderma should be cared for clinically and early rehabilitation should be performed in hospital by a chest physical therapist, little evidence is currently available on its benefits. Therefore, this study demonstrated the benefits of short-term pulmonary rehabilitation during hospitalization in a female patient with chronic scleroderma. The aim of rehabilitation was to improve ventilation and gas exchange by using airway clearance, chest mobilization, and breathing-relearning techniques, including strengthening the respiratory system and the muscles of the limbs by using the BreathMax(®) device and elastic bands...
2016: Clinical Medicine Insights. Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine
Narendra Kumar Narahari, Paramjyothi K Gongati, Shantveer G Uppin, Anu Kapoor, Bhaskar Kakarla, Ramakrishna Dev Tella
A 66-year-old man presented with dry cough and shortness of breath on exertion of 6 months' duration. There were no complaints of fever and hemoptysis. His history was significant for recurrent episodes of respiratory tract infections over the previous 4 years. He had also had episodes of recurrent otitis media and pus discharge from the left ear for 3 years, with progressive loss of hearing. There was no history of recurrent skin infections or diarrhea. He was treated symptomatically with antibiotics by local general practitioners...
October 2016: Chest
Jessica Hellyer, Hunter Oliver-Allen, Majid Shafiq, Alisha Tolani, Maurice Druzin, Michael Jeng, Stanley Rockson, Robert Lowsky
Introduction Gorham-Stout Disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of bony destruction due to lymphangiomatosis, and is often triggered by hormones. One complication of GSD is the development of chylothorax, which carries a high mortality rate. Very little experience has been published to guide management in GSD during pregnancy to optimize both fetal and maternal health. Case Study A 20-year-old woman with known GSD presented with shortness of breath at 18 weeks of pregnancy, due to bilateral chylothoraces which required daily drainage...
October 2016: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
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