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Palliative social worker

Sheng-Yu Fan, I-Mei Lin, Jyh-Gang Hsieh, Chih-Jung Chang
CONTEXT: Psychosocial care is an important component of palliative care, which is also provided by physicians and nurses. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of physicians and nurses in palliative care regarding the process of psychosocial care, the difficulties, and the support needs from psychosocial care professionals. METHODS: A two-phase mixed methods study was conducted. In the first phase, 16 physicians and nurses with palliative care experience were recruited...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Deborah Gilmour, Mark W Davies, Anthony R Herbert
AIM: End-of-life care remains part of the scope of practice in all neonatal units. This study aimed to characterise the end-of-life care provided in an Australian tertiary neonatal centre, where paediatric palliative care was accessible via a consultative service. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study examined indicators of quality palliative care provided to 46 infants born within a 30-month period. The cohort included four infants who received palliative care consultations additional to usual neonatal care...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Tali Samson, Esther Iecovich, Pesach Shvartzman
CONTEXT: Exposure to human suffering may have ramifications for the professional quality of life (ProQol) of palliative care teams. The ProQol scale was designed to assess both negative and positive work-related outcomes, and has been used recently for the evaluation of work-related outcomes among palliative care workers. However, the assessment of ProQol among Israeli hospice workers is scant. OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Hebrew version of the 30-item ProQol questionnaire...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
David B Bekelman, Larry A Allen, Jamie Peterson, Brack Hattler, Edward P Havranek, Diane L Fairclough, Connor F McBryde, Paula M Meek
While contemporary heart failure management has led to some improvements in morbidity and mortality, patients continue to report poor health status (i.e., burdensome symptoms, impaired function, and poor quality of life). The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) trial is a NIH-funded, three-site, randomized clinical trial that examines the effect of the CASA intervention compared to usual care on the primary outcome of patient-reported health status at 6months in patients with heart failure and poor health status...
September 12, 2016: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Joanne Spetz, Nancy Dudley, Laura Trupin, Maggie Rogers, Diane E Meier, Tamara Dumanovsky
The predominant model for palliative care delivery, outside of hospice care, is the hospital-based consultative team. Although a majority of US hospitals offer palliative care services, there has been little research on the staffing of their program teams and whether those teams meet national guidelines, such as the Joint Commission's standard of including at least one physician, an advanced practice or other registered nurse, a social worker, and a chaplain. Data from the 2012-13 annual surveys of the National Palliative Care Registry indicate that only 25 percent of participating programs met that standard based on funded positions, and even when unfunded positions were included, only 39 percent of programs met the standard...
September 1, 2016: Health Affairs
Sarah F D'Ambruoso, Anne Coscarelli, Sara Hurvitz, Neil Wenger, David Coniglio, Dusty Donaldson, Christopher Pietras, Anne M Walling
Our case describes the efforts of team members drawn from oncology, palliative care, supportive care, and primary care to assist a woman with advanced cancer in accepting care for her psychosocial distress, integrating prognostic information so that she could share in decisions about treatment planning, involving family in her care, and ultimately transitioning to hospice. Team members in our setting included a medical oncologist, oncology nurse practitioner, palliative care nurse practitioner, oncology social worker, and primary care physician...
August 30, 2016: Journal of Oncology Practice
Adam E Singer, Joy R Goebel, Yan S Kim, Sydney M Dy, Sangeeta C Ahluwalia, Megan Clifford, Elizabeth Dzeng, Claire E O'Hanlon, Aneesa Motala, Anne M Walling, Jaime Goldberg, Daniella Meeker, Claudia Ochotorena, Roberta Shanman, Mike Cui, Karl A Lorenz
IMPORTANCE: Evidence supports palliative care effectiveness. Given workforce constraints and the costs of new services, payers and providers need help to prioritize their investments. They need to know which patients to target, which personnel to hire, and which services best improve outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To inform how payers and providers should identify patients with "advanced illness" and the specific interventions they should implement, we reviewed the evidence to identify (1) individuals appropriate for palliative care and (2) elements of health service interventions (personnel involved, use of multidisciplinary teams, and settings of care) effective in achieving better outcomes for patients, caregivers, and the healthcare system...
September 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Vitor Parola, Adriana Coelho, Daniela Cardoso, Montserrat Gea-Sanchez, Joan Blanco-Blanco, João Apóstolo
The objective of this review is to examine the evidence on the prevalence of burnout among health professionals working in palliative care.More specifically, the review focuses on the following questions: What is the prevalence of burnout among health professionals working in palliative care? Is there a difference in the prevalence of burnout in different subgroups of health professionals working in palliative care (such as, but not limited to, nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists)? Is there a difference in the prevalence of burnout among health professionals working in different contexts of palliative care (palliative care units, home care, hospices)?...
March 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
Francisca Rego, Rui Nunes
In palliative care, a biopsychosocial-spiritual model is essential to address the patient in its totality. Spirituality is often a relevant issue in such settings, yet there is a need to differentiate spirituality from religion. Spirituality in palliative care focuses on the psychological and spiritual aspects of care, helping to relieve the physical, emotional, social and spiritual distresses of the patient, family members and healthcare professionals, produced in such conditions. Psychologists, according to their ethical responsibilities, may include the assessment of their patients' spiritual needs in therapy, as it will help to identify the patients' values, belief systems, spiritual history, distress and needs...
August 15, 2016: Journal of Health Psychology
N Marcus Thygeson, Meinong Wang, David O'Riordan, Steven Z Pantilat
BACKGROUND: California hospitals report palliative care (PC) program characteristics to the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), but the significance of this information is unknown. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether self-reported California hospital PC program characteristics are associated with lower end-of-life (EoL) Medicare utilization. DESIGN: We performed a cross-sectional study of hospitals submitting 2012 data to OSHPD and included in the 2012 Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare (DAHC) dataset, using statistical hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, and fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis...
August 10, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Kara J Thieleman, Cara Wallace, Andrea N Cimino, Heidi A Rueda
The death of a child may have a profound impact on parents, family members, and health care providers who provided care for the child. Unique challenges are faced by parents of seriously ill children as they must serve as the legal authority for health care decisions of children under age 18, although the child's wishes must also be considered. Social workers must balance core social work values, bioethical values, and psychosocial issues presented by such situations. While studies have been conducted with physicians and nurses regarding ethical issues in pediatric end-of-life care settings, little is known about how social workers experience these conflicts...
July 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
(no author information available yet)
Emergency department case managers are essential to prevent payer denials by ensuring that patient status and level of care is correct; prevent admissions and readmissions by linking patients to community services; improve patient throughput by ensuring that tests are procedures are conducted in a timely manner; and to facilitate hospice and palliative care referrals. Case managers should cover the ED seven days a week during the hours when the volume is highest. Hospitals with a lot of payers that require preauthorization, or a large volume of complex patients, or those with behavioral disorders may need 24-hour coverage...
July 2016: Hospital Case Management: the Monthly Update on Hospital-based Care Planning and Critical Paths
Sandra Lee DiScala, Sarah Onofrio, Maura Miller, Mitchell Nazario, Michael Silverman
OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this quality improvement (QI) project was to determine if the Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Outpatient Clinic (IPCOC) at the West Palm Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center offered improved symptom assessment and palliative care treatment outcomes. Secondary objectives were to identify, classify, and resolve medication problems and calculate the number of pharmacist recommendations accepted by prescribing providers. METHODS: An IPCOC was created by selecting disciplines for a core group including a nurse practitioner, clinical pharmacist, social worker, chaplain, and physician...
July 14, 2016: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Ntsieni S Mashau, Vhonani O Netshandama, Makondelela J Mudau
BACKGROUND: The establishment of home-based care (HBC) programmes in developing countries has resulted in a shift of burden from hospitals to communities where palliative care is provided by voluntary home-based caregivers. AIM: The study investigated the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. SETTING: The study was conducted at HBC organisations located in Mutale Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. METHODS: A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design was applied to investigate the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers...
2016: African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine
(no author information available yet)
Case managers are in a good position to recognize patients who have serious medical problems that are causing them and their family members stress, and refer them for a palliative care consultation, experts say. The palliative care team coordinates with the team providing medical care and helps control pain and other physical symptoms, relieves depression and anxiety, and provides support and spiritual help for the patient and family. The core palliative care team typically includes a medical specialist, a nurse who also acts as a case manager, a social worker, and a spiritual counselor...
June 2016: Hospital Case Management: the Monthly Update on Hospital-based Care Planning and Critical Paths
Elaine Wittenberg, Betty Ferrell, Joy Goldsmith, Sandra L Ragan, Judith Paice
BACKGROUND: Despite increased attention to communication skill training in palliative care, few interprofessional training programs are available and little is known about the impact of such training. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated a communication curriculum offered to interprofessional palliative care teams and examined the longitudinal impact of training. METHODS: Interprofessional, hospital-based palliative care team members were competitively selected to participate in a two-day training using the COMFORT(TM SM) (Communication, Orientation and options, Mindful communication, Family, Openings, Relating, Team) Communication for Palliative Care Teams curriculum...
July 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Karla T Washington, David L Albright, Debra Parker Oliver, L Ashley Gage, Alexandria Lewis, Megan J Mooney
OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the frequency with which hospice and palliative social workers encounter patients, family caregivers, and other clients at risk of suicide, and to discover the extent to which hospice and palliative social workers feel prepared to address issues related to suicide in their professional practice. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of hospice and palliative social workers, recruiting a convenience sample of volunteer respondents through advertisements at professional conferences and listservs, and via social media accounts associated with national organizations, state hospice and palliative care associations, and individual healthcare professionals...
May 23, 2016: Palliative & Supportive Care
Devyani Chandran, J Hope Corbin, Casey Shillam
Palliative care is specialized health care to improve quality of life for patients with serious illness and their families through prevention and relief of suffering. A Palliative Care Institute was held in western Washington to capture community voices about diverse needs, strengths, and opportunities for improvement of palliative care. Researchers employed qualitative methods to obtain thematic data, provide real-time analysis, and engage in a multivoting technique to reflect stakeholder interest in individual themes and prioritize larger group interests...
January 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
J Nicholas Dionne-Odom, Kathleen D Lyons, Imatullah Akyar, Marie A Bakitas
Family caregivers of persons with advanced cancer often take on responsibilities that present daunting and complex problems. Serious problems that go unresolved may be burdensome and result in negative outcomes for caregivers' psychological and physical health and affect the quality of care delivered to the care recipients with cancer, especially at the end of life. Formal problem-solving training approaches have been developed over the past several decades to assist individuals with managing problems faced in daily life...
January 2016: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
Alexander K Smith, Christine S Ritchie, Margaret L Wallhagen
CONTEXT: Age-related hearing loss can impair patient-provider communication about symptom management, goals of care, and end-of-life decision-making. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether hospice and palliative care providers screen for or received training about hearing loss, believe it impacts patient care, and use strategies to optimize communication. METHODS: This was a national survey of hospice and palliative care providers conducted via email and social media...
August 2016: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
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