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What every radiologist should know

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26981227/xanthogranulomatous-cholecystitis-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#1
REVIEW
Vaibhav P Singh, S Rajesh, Chhagan Bihari, Saloni N Desai, Sudheer S Pargewar, Ankur Arora
Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is an uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterized by xanthogranulomatous inflammation of the gallbladder. Intramural accumulation of lipid-laden macrophages and acute and chronic inflammatory cells is the hallmark of the disease. The xanthogranulomatous inflammation of the gallbladder can be very severe and can spill over to the neighbouring structures like liver, bowel and stomach resulting in dense adhesions, perforation, abscess formation, fistulous communication with adjacent bowel...
February 28, 2016: World Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26606917/patient-evaluation-and-preparation-in-vascular-and-interventional-radiology-what-every-interventional-radiologist-should-know-part-2-patient-preparation-and-medications
#2
Bedros Taslakian, Mikhael Georges Sebaaly, Aghiad Al-Kutoubi
Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care. Patient care before and after an interventional procedure, identification, and management of early and delayed complications of various procedures are equal in importance to the procedure itself. In this second part, we complete the comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and patient preparation before vascular and interventional radiology procedures...
April 2016: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26493820/patient-evaluation-and-preparation-in-vascular-and-interventional-radiology-what-every-interventional-radiologist-should-know-part-1-patient-assessment-and-laboratory-tests
#3
Bedros Taslakian, Mikhael Georges Sebaaly, Aghiad Al-Kutoubi
Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome...
March 2016: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26111208/multimodality-imaging-of-primary-extrahepatic-portal-vein-obstruction-ehpvo-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#4
A Arora, S K Sarin
Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, but it can also occur as a primary vascular disorder amid absent liver disease. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) refers to the obstruction of the extrahepatic portal vein with or without involvement of the intrahepatic portal vein branches, splenic and/or superior mesenteric vein. It is a distinct disorder that excludes PVT occurring in concurrence with liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The term "EHPVO" implies chronicity and is principally reserved for a long-standing condition characterized by cavernous transformation of the portal vein...
August 2015: British Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26023944/multi-modality-imaging-of-primary-extra-hepatic-portal-vein-obstruction-ehpvo-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#5
Ankur Arora, Shiv Kumar Sarin
Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis but it can also occur as a primary vascular disorder amid absent liver disease. Extra-hepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO) refers to the obstruction of the extra-hepatic portal vein with or without involvement of the intra-hepatic portal vein branches, splenic and/or superior mesenteric vein. It is a distinct disorder that excludes PVT occurring in concurrence with liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The term 'EHPVO' implies chronicity and is principally reserved for a long-standing condition characterized by cavernous transformation of the portal vein...
May 29, 2015: British Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25962751/emphysema-imaging-for-endoscopic-lung-volume%C3%A2-reduction
#6
REVIEW
B Storbeck, T H Schröder, M Oldigs, K F Rabe, C Weber
UNLABELLED: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type ("bronchitis") on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required...
July 2015: RöFo: Fortschritte Auf Dem Gebiete der Röntgenstrahlen und der Nuklearmedizin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25514699/multimodality-imaging-of-obliterative-portal-venopathy-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#7
REVIEW
A Arora, S K Sarin
Obliterative portal venopathy (OPV) is an important cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, which is often erroneously misdiagnosed as cryptogenic cirrhosis. It has a worldwide distribution with majority of cases hailing from the Asian subcontinent. However, recently the disease has gained global attention particularly because of its association with human immunodeficiency virus infection and use of antiretroviral drug therapy (didanosine). As the name suggests, the disorder is characterized by sclerosis and obliteration of the intrahepatic portal vein branches (with attendant periportal fibrosis) leading to portal hypertension amid intriguingly little liver dysfunction...
February 2015: British Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24938668/what-every-radiologist-should-know-about-paediatric-echocardiography
#8
REVIEW
Erich Sorantin, Bernd Heinzl
Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in less than one percent of all newborns. Echocardiography represents the imaging modality of choice for morphological and functional assessment. In childhood the different CHD types can be diagnosed trustfully and can be performed bedside. In the follow-up of CHD cross sectional imaging plays an important role and therefore it is essential for the radiologist to know the features, challenges and limitations of echocardiography. Within this review article a systematic approach for morphological and functional assessment of the heart will is given along with representative example images...
September 2014: European Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24431029/sternalis-muscle-what-every-anatomist-and-clinician-should-know
#9
REVIEW
Michael Snosek, R Shane Tubbs, Marios Loukas
The sternalis muscle is a well documented but rare muscular variation of the anterior thoracic wall. It lies between the superficial fascia and the pectoral fascia and is found in about 8% of the population. It presents in several morphological variants both unilaterally and bilaterally and has no apparent physiological function. There is still much disagreement about its nerve supply and embryological origin. With the advent of medical imaging and thoracic surgery the clinical importance of this muscle has been re-emphasized...
September 2014: Clinical Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24108550/imaging-of-oncologic-emergencies-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#10
REVIEW
Venkata S Katabathina, Carlos S Restrepo, Sonia L Betancourt Cuellar, Roy F Riascos, Christine O Menias
Acute life-threatening conditions in oncology patients may develop either because of underlying malignancy or as a complication from treatment. Oncologic emergencies can be categorized as metabolic, hematologic, and structural conditions. Metabolic and hematologic emergencies are mainly diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Structural pathologic conditions that result in bleeding, mechanical compression, or obstruction to the hollow organs, such as the trachea and bowel loops, may first be suspected because of clinical findings, including decreasing hematocrit levels, difficulty in breathing, and abdominal pain; however, performance of imaging studies is critical for timely diagnosis and management...
October 2013: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23203446/-hygienic-aspects-in-radiology-what-the-radiologist-should-know
#11
B Buerke, A Mellmann, F Kipp, W Heindel, J Weßling
Hospital hygiene is of pivotal importance in radiology departments, where patient throughput is high and staff come into direct contact with both inpatients and outpatients. Every member of the medical and technical team should be aware of all the general and specific hygiene requirements and ensure that they are considered during the daily routine. Failure to do so on the part of just one individual can result in bacterial contamination in the department, exposing both patients and staff to the risk of infection...
December 2012: RöFo: Fortschritte Auf Dem Gebiete der Röntgenstrahlen und der Nuklearmedizin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22582352/emergent-pediatric-us-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#12
Jonathan R Cogley, Stephen C O'Connor, Roozbeh Houshyar, Khaldoon Al Dulaimy
Appendicitis, intussusception, and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) are three of the most common reasons for emergent abdominal imaging in pediatric patients. Although the use of computed tomography has risen dramatically over the past 2 decades, children are particularly at risk for the adverse effects of ionizing radiation, and even low-dose radiation is associated with a small but significant increase in lifetime risk of fatal cancer. In most emergency departments, the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a primary modality for the evaluation of a child with abdominal pain remains impractical due to its high cost, its limited availability, and the frequent need for sedation...
May 2012: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20674766/a-review-of-charcot-neuroarthropathy-of-the-midfoot-and-hindfoot-what-every-radiologist-needs-to-know
#13
REVIEW
Corrie M Yablon, Naven Duggal, Jim S Wu, Sanjay K Shetty, Fui Dawson, Mary G Hochman
Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) occurs commonly in diabetic patients in the joints of the foot and ankle. Radiologists may be the first to suggest the diagnosis of CN and can facilitate prompt intervention and treatment if they are aware of the radiographic manifestations of CN and the signs of progression of disease. Radiologists should also become aware of the evolving treatment of the disease as focus is shifting toward early surgical intervention and limb salvage rather than amputation. Knowledge of preoperative assessment, the types of surgeries performed, and some of the encountered postoperative complications enable the radiologist to facilitate timely intervention by our surgical colleagues and be a valuable member of the management team...
September 2010: Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20432005/multidetector-ct-for-congenital-heart-patients-what-a-paediatric-radiologist-should-know
#14
REVIEW
Jean-François Paul, Adela Rohnean, Anne Sigal-Cinqualbre
Multidetector CT (MDCT) is increasingly used for imaging congenital heart disease (CHD) patients in addition to echocardiography, due to its ability to provide high quality three-dimensional images, giving a comprehensive evaluation of complex heart malformations. Using 4-slice or 16-slice CT, diagnostic information in CHD patients is limited to extra-cardiac anatomy, mainly the pulmonary arteries, aorta and venous connections. Due to high heart rates in babies however, coronary evaluation and intra-cardiac analysis were not reliable with the first generations of MDCT...
June 2010: Pediatric Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19733310/imaging-of-the-mastoid-middle-ear-and-internal-auditory-canal-after-surgery-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#15
REVIEW
Timothy L Larson, Mathew L Wong
Interpreting CT or MR imaging examinations performed on patients with a history of middle ear, mastoid, or neurotologic surgery can be challenging. This is greatly simplified by knowing the surgical procedures used and the expected postoperative appearance. These are reviewed and illustrated in this article. Knowing the normal postoperative appearance is the key to recognizing signs of recurrent disease.
August 2009: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19041208/an-overview-of-vascular-closure-devices-what-every-radiologist-should-know
#16
REVIEW
L Q Hon, A Ganeshan, S M Thomas, D Warakaulle, J Jagdish, R Uberoi
Haemostatic devices can be categorised according to their mechanism of action into three main types; namely pressure devices, topical haemostatic pads and vascular closure devices (VCD). Of these three categories, it is the development of VCDs that revolutionised management of endovascular procedures. Currently available VCDs fall into three major classes, those that use a collagen plug, those that use clips and those that perform suture closure at the arteriotomy site. This article provides a comprehensive review of the all three classes with examples of commercially available devices...
January 2010: European Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17495281/what-every-radiologist-should-know-about-idiopathic-interstitial-pneumonias
#17
REVIEW
Christina Mueller-Mang, Claudia Grosse, Katharina Schmid, Leopold Stiebellehner, Alexander A Bankier
The American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), published in 2002, defines the morphologic patterns on which clinical-radiologic-pathologic diagnosis of IIPs is based. IIPs include seven entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which is characterized by the morphologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP); nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP); cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP); respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD); desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP); lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP); and acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP)...
May 2007: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
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