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Evolutionary biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213964/when-sensing-is-gambling-an-experimental-system-reveals-how-plasticity-can-generate-tunable-bet-hedging-strategies
#1
Colin S Maxwell, Paul M Magwene
Genotypes can persist in unpredictable environments by 'hedging their bets' and producing diverse phenotypes. Theoretical studies have shown that the phenotypic variability needed for a bet-hedging strategy can be generated by factors either inside or outside an organism. However, sensing the environment and bet hedging are frequently treated as distinct evolutionary strategies. Furthermore, nearly all empirical studies of the molecular underpinnings of bet-hedging strategies to date have focused on internal sources of variability...
February 18, 2017: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211729/stochastic-dynamics-through-hierarchically-embedded-markov-chains
#2
Vítor V Vasconcelos, Fernando P Santos, Francisco C Santos, Jorge M Pacheco
Studying dynamical phenomena in finite populations often involves Markov processes of significant mathematical and/or computational complexity, which rapidly becomes prohibitive with increasing population size or an increasing number of individual configuration states. Here, we develop a framework that allows us to define a hierarchy of approximations to the stationary distribution of general systems that can be described as discrete Markov processes with time invariant transition probabilities and (possibly) a large number of states...
February 3, 2017: Physical Review Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211582/what-can-genome-wide-association-studies-tell-us-about-the-evolutionary-forces-maintaining-genetic-variation-for-quantitative-traits
#3
REVIEW
Emily B Josephs, John R Stinchcombe, Stephen I Wright
I. II. III. IV. V. References SUMMARY: Understanding the evolutionary forces that shape genetic variation within species has long been a goal of evolutionary biology. Integrating data for the genetic architecture of traits from genome-wide association mapping studies (GWAS) along with the development of new population genetic methods for identifying selection in sequence data may allow us to evaluate the roles of mutation-selection balance and balancing selection in shaping genetic variation at various scales...
February 17, 2017: New Phytologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211542/identification-of-the-core-regulators-of-the-hla-i-peptide-binding-process
#4
Yu-Hang Zhang, Zhihao Xing, Chenglin Liu, ShaoPeng Wang, Tao Huang, Yu-Dong Cai, Xiangyin Kong
During the display of peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -I complex for further immune recognition, the cleaved and transported antigenic peptides have to bind to HLA-I protein and the binding affinity between peptide epitopes and HLA proteins directly influences the immune recognition ability in human beings. Key factors affecting the binding affinity during the generation, selection and presentation processes of HLA-I complex have not yet been fully discovered. In this study, a new method describing the HLA class I-peptide interactions was proposed...
February 17, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211463/ecological-and-genetic-basis-of-metapopulation-persistence-of-the-glanville-fritillary-butterfly-in-fragmented-landscapes
#5
Ilkka Hanski, Torsti Schulz, Swee Chong Wong, Virpi Ahola, Annukka Ruokolainen, Sami P Ojanen
Ecologists are challenged to construct models of the biological consequences of habitat loss and fragmentation. Here, we use a metapopulation model to predict the distribution of the Glanville fritillary butterfly during 22 years across a large heterogeneous landscape with 4,415 small dry meadows. The majority (74%) of the 125 networks into which the meadows were clustered are below the extinction threshold for long-term persistence. Among the 33 networks above the threshold, spatial configuration and habitat quality rather than the pooled habitat area predict metapopulation size and persistence, but additionally allelic variation in a SNP in the gene Phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) explains 30% of variation in metapopulation size...
February 17, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208702/the-glutamate-dehydrogenase-pathway-and-its-roles-in-cell-and-tissue-biology-in-health-and-disease
#6
REVIEW
Andreas Plaitakis, Ester Kalef-Ezra, Dimitra Kotzamani, Ioannis Zaganas, Cleanthe Spanaki
Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P)⁺ to NAD(P)H. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate), lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate), and lactate production...
February 8, 2017: Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208500/sign-changes-as-a-universal-concept-in-first-passage-time-calculations
#7
Wilhelm Braun, Rüdiger Thul
First-passage-time problems are ubiquitous across many fields of study, including transport processes in semiconductors and biological synapses, evolutionary game theory and percolation. Despite their prominence, first-passage-time calculations have proven to be particularly challenging. Analytical results to date have often been obtained under strong conditions, leaving most of the exploration of first-passage-time problems to direct numerical computations. Here we present an analytical approach that allows the derivation of first-passage-time distributions for the wide class of nondifferentiable Gaussian processes...
January 2017: Physical Review. E
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207813/interacting-networks-of-resistance-virulence-and-core-machinery-genes-identified-by-genome-wide-epistasis-analysis
#8
Marcin J Skwark, Nicholas J Croucher, Santeri Puranen, Claire Chewapreecha, Maiju Pesonen, Ying Ying Xu, Paul Turner, Simon R Harris, Stephen B Beres, James M Musser, Julian Parkhill, Stephen D Bentley, Erik Aurell, Jukka Corander
Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus)...
February 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202919/ectopic-lymphoid-neogenesis-in-rheumatic-autoimmune-diseases
#9
REVIEW
Michele Bombardieri, Myles Lewis, Costantino Pitzalis
Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis often occurs in the target tissues of patients with chronic rheumatic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome and other connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and myositis. However, the mechanisms of ectopic lymphoid-like structure (ELS) formation and function are not entirely understood. For example, it is unclear whether ELSs indicate distinct disease phenotypes or whether they are evolutionary manifestations of chronic inflammation...
February 9, 2017: Nature Reviews. Rheumatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202809/mammal-body-size-evolution-in-north-america-and-europe-over-20-myr-similar-trends-generated-by-different-processes
#10
Shan Huang, Jussi T Eronen, Christine M Janis, Juha J Saarinen, Daniele Silvestro, Susanne A Fritz
Because body size interacts with many fundamental biological properties of a species, body size evolution can be an essential component of the generation and maintenance of biodiversity. Here we investigate how body size evolution can be linked to the clade-specific diversification dynamics in different geographical regions. We analyse an extensive body size dataset of Neogene large herbivores (covering approx. 50% of the 970 species in the orders Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla) in Europe and North America in a Bayesian framework...
February 22, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202655/constraints-in-cancer-evolution
#11
REVIEW
Subramanian Venkatesan, Nicolai J Birkbak, Charles Swanton
Next-generation deep genome sequencing has only recently allowed us to quantitatively dissect the extent of heterogeneity within a tumour, resolving patterns of cancer evolution. Intratumour heterogeneity and natural selection contribute to resistance to anticancer therapies in the advanced setting. Recent evidence has also revealed that cancer evolution might be constrained. In this review, we discuss the origins of intratumour heterogeneity and subsequently focus on constraints imposed upon cancer evolution...
February 8, 2017: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202591/non-classical-phase-diagram-for-virus-bacterial-coevolution-mediated-by-clustered-regularly-interspaced-short-palindromic-repeats
#12
Pu Han, Michael W Deem
CRISPR is a newly discovered prokaryotic immune system. Bacteria and archaea with this system incorporate genetic material from invading viruses into their genomes, providing protection against future infection by similar viruses. The condition for coexistence of prokaryots and viruses is an interesting problem in evolutionary biology. In this work, we show an intriguing phase diagram of the virus extinction probability, which is more complex than that of the classical predator-prey model. As the CRISPR incorporates genetic material, viruses are under pressure to evolve to escape recognition by CRISPR...
February 2017: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202034/transcriptomic-signatures-shaped-by-cell-proportions-shed-light-on-comparative-developmental-biology
#13
Sophie Pantalacci, Laurent Guéguen, Coraline Petit, Anne Lambert, Renata Peterkovà, Marie Sémon
BACKGROUND: Comparative transcriptomics can answer many questions in developmental and evolutionary developmental biology. Most transcriptomic studies start by showing global patterns of variation in transcriptomes that differ between species or organs through developmental time. However, little is known about the kinds of expression differences that shape these patterns. RESULTS: We compared transcriptomes during the development of two morphologically distinct serial organs, the upper and lower first molars of the mouse...
February 15, 2017: Genome Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197858/mapping-biological-transmission-an-empirical-dynamical-and-evolutionary-approach
#14
Francesca Merlin, Livio Riboli-Sasco
The current debate over extending inheritance and its evolutionary impact has focused on adding new categories of non-genetic factors to the classical transmission of DNA, and on trying to redefine inheritance. Transmitted factors have been mainly characterized by their directions of transmission (vertical, horizontal, or both) and the way they store variations. In this paper, we leave aside the issue of defining inheritance. We rather try to build an evolutionary conceptual framework that allows for tracing most, if not all forms of transmission and makes sense of their different tempos and modes...
February 14, 2017: Acta Biotheoretica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196688/biodiversity-and-topographic-complexity-modern-and-geohistorical-perspectives
#15
REVIEW
Catherine Badgley, Tara M Smiley, Rebecca Terry, Edward B Davis, Larisa R G DeSantis, David L Fox, Samantha S B Hopkins, Tereza Jezkova, Marjorie D Matocq, Nick Matzke, Jenny L McGuire, Andreas Mulch, Brett R Riddle, V Louise Roth, Joshua X Samuels, Caroline A E Strömberg, Brian J Yanites
Topographically complex regions on land and in the oceans feature hotspots of biodiversity that reflect geological influences on ecological and evolutionary processes. Over geologic time, topographic diversity gradients wax and wane over millions of years, tracking tectonic or climatic history. Topographic diversity gradients from the present day and the past can result from the generation of species by vicariance or from the accumulation of species from dispersal into a region with strong environmental gradients...
February 11, 2017: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196465/metabolite-toxicity-determines-the-pace-of-molecular-evolution-within-microbial-populations
#16
Elin E Lilja, David R Johnson
BACKGROUND: The production of toxic metabolites has shaped the spatial and temporal arrangement of metabolic processes within microbial cells. While diverse solutions to mitigate metabolite toxicity have evolved, less is known about how evolution itself is affected by metabolite toxicity. We hypothesized that the pace of molecular evolution should increase as metabolite toxicity increases. At least two mechanisms could cause this. First, metabolite toxicity could increase the mutation rate...
February 14, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193177/anopheline-salivary-protein-genes-and-gene-families-an-evolutionary-overview-after-the-whole-genome-sequence-of-sixteen-anopheles-species
#17
Bruno Arcà, Fabrizio Lombardo, Claudio J Struchiner, José M C Ribeiro
BACKGROUND: Mosquito saliva is a complex cocktail whose pharmacological properties play an essential role in blood feeding by counteracting host physiological response to tissue injury. Moreover, vector borne pathogens are transmitted to vertebrates and exposed to their immune system in the context of mosquito saliva which, in virtue of its immunomodulatory properties, can modify the local environment at the feeding site and eventually affect pathogen transmission. In addition, the host antibody response to salivary proteins may be used to assess human exposure to mosquito vectors...
February 13, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192619/genomic-signatures-of-adaptation-to-wine-biological-aging-conditions%C3%A2-in-biofilm-forming-flor-yeasts
#18
A L Coi, F Bigey, S Mallet, S Marsit, G Zara, P Gladieux, V Galeote, M Budroni, S Dequin, J L Legras
The molecular and evolutionary processes underlying fungal domestication remain largely unknown despite the importance of fungi to bioindustry and for comparative adaptation genomics in eukaryotes. Wine fermentation and biological aging are performed by strains of S. cerevisiae with, respectively, pelagic fermentative growth on glucose, and biofilm aerobic growth utilizing ethanol. Here, we use environmental samples of wine and flor yeasts to investigate the genomic basis of yeast adaptation to contrasted anthropogenic environments...
February 13, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191733/a-novel-dynamic-expression-of-vasa-in-male-germ-cells-during-spermatogenesis-in-the-chinese-soft-shell-turtle-pelidiscus-sinensis
#19
Wei Li, Piaoyi Zhang, Xuling Wu, Xinping Zhu, Hongyan Xu
vasa gene encodes a highly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase, required for germ cell development across animal kingdom. Vasa mutations cause male infertility in mammals. It has been widely used as a biomarker for studying animal fertility or manipulating germ cells in organisms. However, in reptilians, the functions of vasa gene involved in germ cell differentiation are largely unclear; this hampers the development of biological techniques and the improvement of the productivity in these species. Here a vasa cDNA was isolated in Chinese soft-shell turtle and it predicts a protein of 691 amino acid residues, which is 72%, 69%, 58%, 59%, and 54-56% identical to its homolog from mouse, platypus, frog, chicken, and fish, respectively, and named as PsVasa...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191457/the-copper-transport-associated-protein-ctr4-can-form-prion-like-epigenetic-determinants-in-schizosaccharomyces-pombe
#20
Theodora Sideri, Yoko Yashiroda, David A Ellis, María Rodríguez-López, Minoru Yoshida, Mick F Tuite, Jürg Bähler
Prions are protein-based infectious entities associated with fatal brain diseases in animals, but also modify a range of host-cell phenotypes in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many questions remain about the evolution and biology of prions. Although several functionally distinct prion-forming proteins exist in S. cerevisiae, [HET-s] of Podospora anserina is the only other known fungal prion. Here we investigated prion-like, protein-based epigenetic transmission in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe...
January 2017: Microbial Cell
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