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Metabolic stress

Andriy Bilichak, Igor Kovalchuk
DNA strand breaks arise from normal cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and DNA repair as well as spontaneous DNA damage caused by cell metabolic activities. In addition, strand breaks occur due to direct or indirect DNA damage produced by various abiotic and biotic stresses. Strand breaks are among the most problematic DNA lesions because unrepaired strand breaks may lead to cell cycle arrest, gross chromosome rearrangements, or even cell death. Thus, the measurement of the relative number of strand breaks can provide an informative picture of genome stability of a given cell, tissue, or organism...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Zhuqing Leslie Li, Yonghui Shi, Yinyi Ding, Yumei Ran, Guowei Le
Oxidized tyrosine (O-Tyr) products have been detected in commercial food and have been demonstrated to induce liver injury in our previous study, but the precise mechanisms of the impact induced by dietary O-Tyr are still unclear. Kidney plays an important role in the metabolism of protein. Accumulation of O-Tyr products, especially the dityrosine (Dityr) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), in vivo was shown to be associated with many kidney diseases. Therefore, this study determined whether chronic exposure to dietary O-Tyr impaired renal function in rats...
October 21, 2016: Amino Acids
Wilfried Dinh, Barbara Albrecht-Küpper, Mihai Gheorghiade, Adriaan A Voors, Michael van der Laan, Hani N Sabbah
Adenosine exerts a variety of physiological effects by binding to cell surface G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes, namely, A1, A2a, A2b, and A3. The central physiological role of adenosine is to preclude tissue injury and promote repair in response to stress. In the heart, adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator, linking cardiac function to metabolic demand predominantly via activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs), which leads to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity, modulation of protein kinase C, and opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels...
October 22, 2016: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Eva F G Naninck, J Efraim Oosterink, Kit-Yi Yam, Lennart P de Vries, Henk Schierbeek, Johannes B van Goudoever, Rikst-Nynke Verkaik-Schakel, Josèe A Plantinga, Torsten Plosch, Paul J Lucassen, Aniko Korosi
Early-life stress (ES) impairs cognition later in life. Because ES prevention is problematic, intervention is needed, yet the mechanisms that underlie ES remain largely unknown. So far, the role of early nutrition in brain programming has been largely ignored. Here, we demonstrate that essential 1-carbon metabolism-associated micronutrients (1-CMAMs; i.e., methionine and B vitamins) early in life are crucial in programming later cognition by ES. ES was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice from postnatal d (P)2-9. 1-CMAM levels were measured centrally and peripherally by using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy...
October 21, 2016: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Drew A Torigian, Judith Green-McKenzie, Xianling Liu, Frances S Shofer, Thomas Werner, Catherine E Smith, Andrew A Strasser, Mateen C Moghbel, Ami H Parekh, Grace Choi, Marcus D Goncalves, Natalie Spaccarelli, Saied Gholami, Prithvi S Kumar, Yubing Tong, Jayaram K Udupa, Clementina Mesaros, Abass Alavi
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to systematically detect and quantify differential effects of chronic tobacco use in organs of the whole body. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty healthy male subjects (10 nonsmokers and 10 chronic heavy smokers) were enrolled. Subjects underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT, diagnostic unenhanced chest CT, mini-mental state examination, urine testing for oxidative stress, and serum testing...
October 18, 2016: Academic Radiology
A Amaddeo, L de Sanctis, J Olmo Arroyo, J-P Giordanella, P-J Monteyrol, B Fauroux
Obesity, along with hypertrophy of the adenoids and the tonsils, represents one of the major risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Obesity is associated with an increase in the prevalence and the severity of OSA and is a major factor in the persistence and aggravation of OSA over time. Neurocognitive dysfunction and abnormal behavior are the most important and frequent end-organ morbidities associated with OSA in children. Other deleterious consequences such as cardiovascular stress and metabolic syndrome are less common in children than in adults with OSA...
October 18, 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Shengnan Zhai, Genying Li, Youwei Sun, Jianmin Song, Jihu Li, Guoqi Song, Yulian Li, Hongqing Ling, Zhonghu He, Xianchun Xia
BACKGROUND: Phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1) is the most important regulatory enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, whereas its function is hardly known in common wheat. The aims of the present study were to investigate Psy1 function and genetic regulation using reverse genetics approaches. RESULTS: Transcript levels of Psy1 in RNAi transgenic lines were decreased by 54-76 % and yellow pigment content (YPC) was reduced by 26-35 % compared with controls, confirming the impact of Psy1 on carotenoid accumulation...
October 21, 2016: BMC Plant Biology
Anne-Sophie Dumas, Ludivine Taconnat, Evangelos Barbas, Guillem Rigaill, Olivier Catrice, Delphine Bernard, Abdelilah Benamar, David Macherel, Abdelhak El Amrani, Richard Berthomé
BACKGROUND: Higher plants have to cope with increasing concentrations of pollutants of both natural and anthropogenic origin. Given their capacity to concentrate and metabolize various compounds including pollutants, plants can be used to treat environmental problems - a process called phytoremediation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the stabilization, the extraction, the accumulation and partial or complete degradation of pollutants by plants remain poorly understood. RESULTS: Here, we determined the molecular events involved in the early plant response to phenanthrene, used as a model of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons...
October 21, 2016: BMC Genomics
Carly B Garrison, Kristin J Lastwika, Yuzheng Zhang, Christopher I Li, Paul D Lampe
Proteomic studies can offer information on hundreds to thousands of proteins and potentially provide researchers with a comprehensive understanding of signaling response during stress and disease. Large datasets, such as those obtained in high-dimensional proteomic studies, can be leveraged for pathway analysis to discover or describe the biological implications of clinical disease states. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that is considered a risk factor for numerous other diseases. We performed analysis on plasma proteomic data from 3 separate sample sets of post-menopausal women to identify the pathways that are altered in subjects with a high body mass index (BMI) compared to normal BMI...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Anna Chung-Kwan Tse, Jing-Woei Li, Simon Yuan Wang, Ting-Fung Chan, Keng Po Lai, Rudolf Shiu-Sun Wu
Hypoxia is a global environmental concern and poses a significant threat to aquatic ecosystems, including the sustainability of natural fish populations. The deleterious effects of hypoxia on fish reproductive fitness, as mediated by disruption of sex hormones and gene expression along the Brain-Pituitary-Gonad axis, have been well documented. Recently, we further demonstrated that the observed disruption of steroidogenesis in the ovary of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma is mediated through microRNAs (miRNAs)...
October 8, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Shlomo Sasson
Activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) induces the expression of genes encoding enzymes that metabolize fatty acids and carbohydrate. Attempts to identify cellular activators of PPARδ produced large lists of various fatty acids and their metabolic derivatives; however, there is no consensus on specific and selective binding interactions of natural ligands with PPARδ. Most models on binding interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD) of PPARδ have been derived from analyses of PPARδ-LBD crystals formed with synthetic low molecular weight ligands...
October 18, 2016: Biochimie
Marie-Catherine Drigeard Desgarnier, Corinne Zinflou, Justin D Mallet, Sébastien P Gendron, Sébastien J Méthot, Patrick J Rochette
Purpose: Human chromosomes are protected at their end by a long portion of hexameric tandem repeats, the telomere. In somatic cells, telomere attrition caused by endogenous and exogenous oxidative stress as well as DNA replication can threaten genomic integrity and lead to the deterioration of tissue functions and an age-related physiological decline. The human eye is a complex organ in which cells of different ocular tissues are exposed to photo-oxidation, high mitochondrial metabolic activity, and/or replicative pressure...
October 1, 2016: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Gregory Plotnikoff, Melissa Barber
INTRODUCTION: Single-disorder or single-organ-system clinical practice guidelines are often of limited usefulness in guiding effective management of patients with chronic multidimensional signs and symptoms. The presence of multiple long-standing medical problems in a given patient despite intensive medical effort suggests that addressing systemic core imbalances could complement more narrowly focused approaches. CASE PRESENTATION: A 72-year-old man experiencing longstanding depression, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic pain in the context of additional refractory illnesses was assessed and treated, guided by a system-oriented approach to underlying core imbalances termed functional medicine...
October 14, 2016: Permanente Journal
Liane Balvedi Poersch-Bortolon, Jorge Fernando Pereira, Antonio Nhani, Hebert Hernán Soto Gonzáles, Gisele Abigail Montan Torres, Luciano Consoli, Rafael Augusto Arenhart, Maria Helena Bodanese-Zanettini, Márcia Margis-Pinheiro
Drought limits wheat production in the Brazilian Cerrado biome. In order to search for candidate genes associated to the response to water deficit, we analyzed the gene expression profiles, under severe drought stress, in roots and leaves of the cultivar MGS1 Aliança, a well-adapted cultivar to the Cerrado. A set of 4,422 candidate genes was found in roots and leaves. The number of down-regulated transcripts in roots was higher than the up-regulated transcripts, while the opposite occurred in leaves. The number of common transcripts between the two tissues was 1,249, while 2,124 were specific to roots and 1,049 specific to leaves...
October 20, 2016: Genetics and Molecular Biology
Bhavisha Bakrania, Joey P Granger, Romain Harmancey
The mammalian heart is a major consumer of ATP and requires a constant supply of energy substrates for contraction. Not surprisingly, alterations of myocardial metabolism have been linked to the development of contractile dysfunction and heart failure. Therefore, unraveling the link between metabolism and contraction should shed light on some of the mechanisms governing cardiac adaptation or maladaptation in disease states. The isolated working rat heart preparation can be used to follow, simultaneously and in real time, cardiac contractile function and flux of energy providing substrates into oxidative metabolic pathways...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Helena Lenasi, Markos Klonizakis
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with cardiovascular complications. Impairment of glycemic control induces noxious glycations, an increase in oxydative stress and dearangement of various metabolic pathways. DM leads to dysfunction of micro and macrovessels, connected to metabolic, endothelial and autonomic nervous system. Thus, assessing vascular reactivity might be one of the clinical tools to evaluate the impact of harmful effects of DM and potential benefit of treatment; skin and skeletal muscle microcirculation have usually been tested...
October 18, 2016: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
Pierre Pétriacq, Guillaume Tcherkez, Bertrand Gakière
NAD is a pyridine nucleotide that is involved in cell metabolism and signaling of plant growth and stress. Recently, we reported on the multifaceted nature of NAD-inducible immunity in Arabidopsis. We identified NAD as an integral regulator of multiple defense layers such as production of ROS, deposition of callose, stimulation of cell death and modulation of defense metabolism including the defense hormones SA, JA and ABA, and other defense-associated metabolites. Altogether, NAD-induced immune effects confer resistance to diverse pathogenic microbes...
October 21, 2016: Plant Signaling & Behavior
Surya Narayan Pradhan, Aleena Das, Ramovatar Meena, Ranjan Kumar Nanda, Paulraj Rajamani
Occupational exposure to air pollution induces oxidative stress and prolonged exposure increases susceptibility to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in several working groups. Biofluid of these subjects may reflect perturbed metabolic phenotypes. In this study we carried out a comparative molecular profiling study using parallel biofluids collected from subjects (n = 85) belonging to auto rickshaw drivers (ARD), traffic cops (TC) and office workers (OW). Higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation markers in serum of ARD subjects were observed as compared to OW and TC...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Christian Weber, Mikael Koutero, Marie-Agnes Dillies, Hugo Varet, Cesar Lopez-Camarillo, Jean Yves Coppée, Chung-Chau Hon, Nancy Guillén
Amoebiasis is a human infectious disease due to the amoeba parasite Entamoeba histolytica. The disease appears in only 20% of the infections. Diversity in phenotypes may occur within the same infectious strain in the gut; for instance, parasites can be commensal (in the intestinal lumen) or pathogenic (inside the tissue). The degree of pathogenesis of clinical isolates varies greatly. These findings raise the hypothesis that genetic derivation may account for amoebic diverse phenotypes. The main goal of this study was to analyse gene expression changes of a single virulent amoebic strain in different environmental contexts where it exhibit different degrees of virulence, namely isolated from humans and maintained through animal liver passages, in contact with the human colon and short or prolonged in vitro culture...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Yuji Kaneko, Colleen Pappas, Naoki Tajiri, Cesar V Borlongan
Oxytocin protects against ischemia-induced inflammation and oxidative stress, and is associated with GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter) signaling transduction in neurons. However, the molecular mechanism by which oxytocin affords neuroprotection, especially the interaction between oxytocin receptor and GABAA receptor (GABAAR), remains to be elucidated. Primary rat neural cells were exposed to oxytocin before induction of experimental acute stroke model via oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD/R) injury...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
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