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pres syndrome

Lei Zhang, Jian Xu
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare clinical entity associated with systemic lupus erythematosus which characterized by seizure, headache, and altered mental status. The pathophysiology involves subcortical vasogenic edema secondary to hypertension and endothelial damage. PRES is reversible with withdrawal of the offending agent, strict blood pressure control, and treating the underlying disease. We report present here a patient with lupus nephritis who developed PRES following mycophenolate administration...
2018: American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology
Eiichi Katada, Akira Mitsui, Shigeru Sasaki, Norihiko Uematsu, Chise Anan
A 44-year-old woman with advanced metastatic colon cancer received chemotherapies comprising XELOX, FOLFIRI/panitumumab and mFOLFOX6/bevacizumab. Fifteen months later, she presented with the acute onset of a headache, drowsiness and seizure with a fever and hypertension. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated bilateral regions of signal hyperintensity in the white matter with spasms of bilateral cerebral arteries apparent on magnetic resonance angiography. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was diagnosed, and treatments resulted in improvement of the MRI findings, but the patient experienced cerebral infarction and ultimately died of deterioration of cancer on day 26 after the onset of PRES...
March 9, 2018: Internal Medicine
Manveer Garcha, Keithan Sivakumar, Mohammed El-Hunjul, Shweta Varade, Hussam A Yacoub
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is clinically characterized by seizures, changes in vision, altered mental status, and headache, with associated radiologic changes on brain imaging. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a rare complication of PRES and an atypical initial presentation of this condition. In this report, we discuss two patients who presented with multifocal cerebral hemorrhages that were later attributed to PRES. We further expand on the pathophysiology, management, and prognosis on patients with hemorrhagic PRES...
March 8, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Sang-Woo Lee, Seung-Jae Lee
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a disorder of reversible vasogenic brain edema which mainly involves the parieto-occipital lobes in various clinical settings. The main mechanism is known to be cerebral autoregulation failure and endothelial dysfunction leading to the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman with PRES which involved the brain stem and thalami, sparing the cerebral hemispheres. She was admitted to the emergency room because of acute-onset confusion...
January 2018: Case Reports in Neurology
Yuh-Chen Kuo, Hann-Chorng Kuo
AIMS: To investigate the characteristics of videourodynamic study (VUDS) in females with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) focusing on the etiologies of bladder outlet dysfunction (BOD) and their associations with clinical and urodynamic parameters. METHODS: IC/BPS females with complete data on symptom assessment, VUDS, the potassium sensitivity test, and cystoscopic hydrodistention were reviewed retrospectively. Diagnoses of bladder dysfunction (hypersensitive bladder, HSB) and BOD including dysfunctional voiding (DV), poor relaxation of the external urethral sphincter (PRES), and bladder neck dysfunction (BND) were made by VUDS...
March 5, 2018: Neurourology and Urodynamics
Aakriti Pandita, David F Lehmann
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a potentially reversible failure of cerebral autoregulation managed by correction of hypertension or underlying medical condition. Nonresponding cases progress to irreversible brain damage. There is some evidence of association of hypomagnesemia with PRES. We describe a case of nonresolving PRES where use of magnesium sulfate led to improvement in neurological function and eventual recovery. Our case highlights the need for a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of magnesium in PRES...
March 2018: Neurologist
Olaf Eberhardt
The urgency and intensity of therapeutic response to a hypertensive crisis are governed by the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage, which define hypertensive emergency and hypertensive urgency, respectively. In case of hypertensive urgency a slow and moderate lowering of blood pressure by oral antihypertensive agents seems adequate, while the approach to hypertensive emergency has to be tailored to the specific type of organ failure. Optimal blood pressure management in the context of neurovascular emergencies is made difficult by contradictory data from observational and interventional studies...
February 28, 2018: Fortschritte der Neurologie-Psychiatrie
Joseph B Miller, Kushak Suchdev, Namita Jayaprakash, Daniel Hrabec, Aditya Sood, Snigdha Sharma, Phillip D Levy
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the latest science on hypertensive encephalopathy and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of these overlapping syndromes and discuss best practices for diagnosis and management. RECENT FINDINGS: Diagnosis of hypertensive encephalopathy largely relies on exclusion of other neurological emergencies. We review the extensive causes of PRES and its imaging characteristics...
February 26, 2018: Current Hypertension Reports
Andrew King, Mirjana Dimovska, Luke Bisoski
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Acute drug-induced hypertension, sympathomimetic toxicity, and other hyperadrenergic states can be caused by both xenobiotic toxicity and withdrawal. This manuscript is a selective review of the recent literature regarding pharmacologic causes of hypertensive emergencies and other hyperadrenergic states. RECENT FINDINGS: We will discuss designer stimulants, alpha2 and baclofen agonist withdrawal, and the clinical entity known as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)...
February 24, 2018: Current Hypertension Reports
Courtney Stanley Sundin, Michelle Laurane Johnson
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a newly defined syndrome; therefore, this transient clinical condition is not well known and probably underdiagnosed. It develops quickly with symptoms that are usually indistinguishable from eclampsia. Nurses need to be knowledgeable and aware of identifying symptoms and appropriate treatment. The condition is thought to share pathophysiology with eclampsia, and it is suggested that endothelial dysfunction combined with hypertension causes disruption in the blood brain barrier resulting in cerebral edema...
March 2018: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
M Yigit, E Yigit, K A Turkdogan
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an entity characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, visual disturbances, and focal neurological signs. The most common etiologies of PRES are hypertension and renal failure, and the most frequent pathophysiology is hyperperfusion. PRES is generally symmetrical, often in the occipital and parietal lobes, and is typically characterized by vasogenic edema in the subcortical white matter. This study involves a 38-year-old female patient who had hypertension, used immunosuppressive drugs and was also found to have nephropathy...
February 2018: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice
Amy Louise Ross Russell, Martin Prevett, Paul Cook, Charles Simon Barker, Ashwin Arnold Pinto
Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation. Deficiency can cause several neurological complications, including cerebellar syndromes, with various MRI findings. These include cerebellar oedema, presumably through a similar mechanism to that in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). People particularly vulnerable to deficiency include those with high alcohol consumption, excessive loss due to gastrointestinal pathology and those taking certain medications, including proton pump inhibitors...
February 15, 2018: Practical Neurology
Mercedes Moreiras-Plaza, Francisco Fernández-Fleming, Naiara Azkárate-Ramírez, Walfred Nájera-de la Garza, Isabel Martín-Baez, Maria Hernansanz-Pérez
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity with acute or subacute neurological presentation associated with brain lesions that primarily affect the white matter of the posterior regions. It is often associated with the rapid onset of severe hypertension and/or with kidney failure (acute and chronic), but it has also been reported as a neurological complication in several medical conditions. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of cases and related publications due to the advance of diagnostic imaging techniques...
February 3, 2018: Nefrología: Publicación Oficial de la Sociedad Española Nefrologia
Chen Makranz, Salome Khutsurauli, Yosef Kalish, Ruth Eliahou, Luna Kadouri, John Moshe Gomori, Alexander Lossos
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome characterized by headaches, seizures, a confusional state and visual disturbances associated with transient predominantly bilateral posterior white mater magnetic resonance imaging lesions. It is primarily reported in the setting of hypertension, acute renal failure, peripartum eclampsia, autoimmune disease, immunosuppression and chemotherapy. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has also been reported as potential PRES inducer...
January 2018: Molecular and Clinical Oncology
Serdal Gungor, Betul Kilic, Yilmaz Tabel, Ayse Selimoglu, Unsal Ozgen, Sezai Yilmaz
Objective: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by typical radiologic findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, focal neurologic deficits, and seizures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological features of PRES in children and to emphasize the recognition of atypical features. Materials & Methods: We retrospectively examined 23 children with PRES from Mar 2010-Apr 2015 in Inonu University Turgut Ozal Medical Center in Turkey...
2018: Iranian Journal of Child Neurology
Ehab Saad Aldin, Parren McNeely, Yusuf Menda
We present a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a pediatric patient with Burkitt's lymphoma predominantly involving the bone marrow. F-FDG PET/CT scan obtained after the first cycle of chemotherapy, complicated by acute kidney injury, hypertension, tumor lysis syndrome, and lethargy with focal neurological symptoms, showed a favorable marrow and lymph node response but increased FDG uptake in the bilateral frontal and occipital cortical/subcortical regions. Brain MRI was consistent with PRES...
January 19, 2018: Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Fanny Herisson, Iris Zhou, Jerome Mawet, E Du, Arnavaz H Barfejani, Tao Qin, Marilyn J Cipolla, Philip Z Sun, Natalia S Rost, Cenk Ayata
Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) on high-salt diet are characterized by extremely high arterial pressures, and have been endorsed as a model for hypertensive small vessel disease and vascular cognitive impairment. However, rapidly developing malignant hypertension is a well-known cause of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in humans, associated with acute neurological deficits, seizures, vasogenic cerebral edema and microhemorrhages. In this study, we aimed to examine the overlap between human PRES and SHRSP on high-salt diet...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Akira Komori, Daisuke Mizu, Koichi Ariyoshi
BACKGROUND: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a condition characterized by seizures, altered consciousness, visual disturbances, and headache. Characteristic findings on neuroimaging include cerebral edema, typically involving the parieto-occipital white matter. PRES has been associated with hypertension, autoimmune disease, and Henoch-Schölein purpura (HSP), but few cases have been reported, and fewer cases of PRES have been reported in children. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with blindness and semi-consciousness...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jianfei Nao, Han Zhang, Si Wu, Xiaotian Zhang, Dongming Zheng
INTRODUCTION: In addition to diffuse brain oedema, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can lead to ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, extrapontine myelinolysis, and sinovenous thrombosis. However, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and spinal cord oedema are rarely reported in patients with DKA. METHODS: We present a case of a 17-year-old-girl who developed headache, blurred vision, and paraplegia after her DKA was controlled. Sequential magnetic resonance (MR) scans of the brain and spinal cord were performed...
January 12, 2018: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Nicholas Willard, Justin M Honce, B K Kleinschmidt-DeMasters
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was described in 1996 as a clinical-neuroimaging entity characterized by parieto-occipital watershed-region edema without overt infarction. It has been linked to hypertension, eclampsia, immunosuppressive therapies, infections, and autoimmune disorders. The condition usually has an acute onset, presents with seizures, and ameliorates within days. There have been few neuropathological studies, but in some cases, tissue damage may be more permanent.
February 1, 2018: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
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