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Artificial human organs

Minoo Heidari Kani, Eng-Cheng Chan, Roger C Young, Trent Butler, Roger Smith, Jonathan W Paul
Research insights into uterine function and the mechanisms of labour have been hindered by the lack of suitable animal and cellular models. The use of traditional culturing methods limits the exploration of complex uterine functions, such as cell interactions, connectivity and contractile behaviour, as it fails to mimic the three-dimensional (3D) nature of uterine cell interactions in vivo. Animal models are an option, however, use of these models is constrained by ethical considerations as well as translational limitations to humans...
October 21, 2016: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
N Rostami, R C Shields, S A Yassin, A R Hawkins, L Bowen, T L Luo, A H Rickard, R Holliday, P M Preshaw, N S Jakubovics
Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been identified in the matrix of many different monospecies biofilms in vitro, including some of those produced by oral bacteria. In many cases, eDNA stabilizes the structure of monospecies biofilms. Here, the authors aimed to determine whether eDNA is an important component of natural, mixed-species oral biofilms, such as plaque on natural teeth or dental implants. To visualize eDNA in oral biofilms, approaches for fluorescently stained eDNA with either anti-DNA antibodies or an ultrasensitive cell-impermeant dye, YOYO-1, were first developed using Enterococcus faecalis, an organism that has previously been shown to produce extensive eDNA structures within biofilms...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Dental Research
Tiele Caprioli Machado, Marla Azário Lansarin
The hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), which is generated in the electroplating process, is toxic to most organisms and potentially harmful to human health. The method generally used for remediation of wastewater containing Cr(VI) employs chemicals with high toxicity. This work proposes an alternative technology for the treatment of these wastewaters, based on photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) by alcohols under radiation, which is environmentally sustainable and economically viable. Initially, a batch reactor in laboratory scale was used to determine the best experimental conditions and its specific reaction rate was calculated...
October 2016: Water Science and Technology: a Journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research
Hans Lehrach
Every human is unique. We differ in our genomes, environment, behavior, disease history, and past and current medical treatment-a complex catalog of differences that often leads to variations in the way each of us responds to a particular therapy. We argue here that true personalization of drug therapies will rely on "virtual patient" models based on a detailed characterization of the individual patient by molecular, imaging, and sensor techniques. The models will be based, wherever possible, on the molecular mechanisms of disease processes and drug action but can also expand to hybrid models including statistics/machine learning/artificial intelligence-based elements trained on available data to address therapeutic areas or therapies for which insufficient information on mechanisms is available...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Cheng Zhong, Hai-Yang Xie, Lin Zhou, Xiao Xu, Shu-Sen Zheng
BACKGROUND: Because of an increasing discrepancy between the number of potential liver graft recipients and the number of organs available, scientists are trying to create artificial liver to mimic normal liver function and therefore, to support the patient's liver when in dysfunction. 3D printing technique meets this purpose. The present study was to test the feasibility of 3D hydrogel scaffolds for liver engineering. METHODS: We fabricated 3D hydrogel scaffolds with a bioprinter...
October 2016: Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International: HBPD INT
Jamie Hudson, Frédérique Viard, Charlotte Roby, Marc Rius
Human activities are responsible for the translocation of vast amounts of organisms, altering natural patterns of dispersal and gene flow. Most research to date has focused on the consequences of anthropogenic transportation of non-indigenous species within introduced ranges, with little research focusing on native species. Here, we compared genetic patterns of the sessile marine invertebrate, Ciona intestinalis, which has highly restricted dispersal capabilities. We collected individuals in a region of the species' native range where human activities that are known to facilitate the artificial spread of species are prevalent...
October 2016: Biology Letters
Danilo E F L Flôres, Milene G Jannetti, Veronica S Valentinuzzi, Gisele A Oda
Synchronization of biological rhythms to the 24-hour day/night has long been studied with model organisms, under artificial light/dark cycles in the laboratory. The commonly used rectangular light/dark cycles, comprising hours of continuous light and darkness, may not be representative of the natural light exposure for most species, including humans. Subterranean rodents live in dark underground tunnels and offer a unique opportunity to investigate extreme mechanisms of photic entrainment in the wild. Here, we show automated field recordings of the daily light exposure patterns in a South American subterranean rodent, the tuco-tuco (Ctenomys aff...
October 4, 2016: Scientific Reports
Matthew Torres, Henry Dewhurst, Niveda Sundararaman
Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function &- a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) &- a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al...
October 3, 2016: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics: MCP
Tomoaki Mori, Kento Nakamura, Keisuke Masaoka, Yusuke Fujita, Ryosuke Morisada, Koichi Mori, Takamasa Tobimatsu, Takashi Sera
Various viruses infect animals and humans and cause a variety of diseases, including cancer. However, effective methodologies to prevent virus infection have not yet been established. Therefore, development of technologies to inactivate viruses is highly desired. We have already demonstrated that cleavage of a DNA virus genome was effective to prevent its replication. Here, we expanded this methodology to RNA viruses. In the present study, we used staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) instead of the PIN domain (PilT N-terminus) of human SMG6 as an RNA-cleavage domain and fused the SNase to a human Pumilio/fem-3 binding factor (PUF)-based artificial RNA-binding protein to construct an artificial RNA restriction enzyme with enhanced RNA-cleavage rates for influenzavirus...
October 28, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Reeba M Jacob, Austin T Mudd, Lindsey S Alexander, Chron-Si Lai, Ryan N Dilger
INTRODUCTION: Provision of adequate nutrients is critical for proper growth and development of the neonate, yet the impact of breastfeeding versus formula feeding on neural maturation has to be fully determined. Using the piglet as a model for the human infant, our objective was to compare neurodevelopment of piglets that were either sow-reared (SR) or artificially reared (AR) in an artificial setting. METHODS: Over a 25-day feeding study, piglets (1.5 ± 0...
2016: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Natalia Szczepańska, Jacek Namieśnik, Błażej Kudłak
Analysis of literature data shows that there is limited information about the harmful biological effects of mixture of compounds from the EDC group that are released from the surface of toys and objects intended for children and infants. One of the tools that can be used to obtain such information is appropriate bioanalytical tests. The aim of this research involved determining whether tests that use living organisms as an active element (Vibrio fischeri-Microtox®, Heterocypris incongruens-Ostrocodtoxkit F™ and the XenoScreen YES/YAS™ test of oestrogenic/androgenic activity) can be a tool for estimating the combined toxic effects induced by xenobiotics released from objects intended for children...
September 23, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Veronika Pilařová, Mumtaz Sultani, Kristine Skoglund Ask, Lucie Nováková, Stig Pedersen-Bjergaard, Astrid Gjelstad
The new microextraction technique named parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME) was introduced as an alternative approach to liquid-liquid extraction of charged analytes from aqueous samples. The concept is based on extraction of analytes across a supported liquid membrane sustained in the pores of a thin polymeric membrane, a well-known extraction principle also used in hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME). However, the new PALME technique offers a more user-friendly setup in which the supported liquid membrane is incorporated in a 96 well plate system...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Chromatography. B, Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Damien Jeannerat
The introduction of a universal data format to report the correlation data of 2D NMR spectra such as COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra will have a large impact on the reliability of structure determination of small organic molecules. These lists of assigned cross peaks will bridge signals found in NMR 1D and 2D spectra and the assigned chemical structure. The record could be very compact, human and computer readable so that it can be included in the supplementary material of publications and easily transferred into databases of scientific literature and chemical compounds...
September 18, 2016: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry: MRC
Giorgio Gemignani, Alessandro Rozza
Motion detection in video streams is a challenging task for several computer vision applications. Indeed, segmentation of moving and static elements in the scene allows to increase the efficiency of several challenging tasks, such as human-computer interface, robot visions, and intelligent surveillance systems. In this paper, we approach motion detection through a multi-layered artificial neural network, which is able to build for each background pixel a multi-modal color distribution evolving over time through self-organization...
November 2016: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing: a Publication of the IEEE Signal Processing Society
Wen-Jing Deng, Hai-Long Zheng, Anita K Y Tsui, Xun-Wen Chen
Indoor air pollution is closely related to children's health. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and dechlorane plus (DP) transmitted through indoor PM2.5 and dust, along with carbonyl compounds and black carbon (BC) aerosol were analysed in five Hong Kong kindergartens. The results showed that 60% of the median PM2.5 levels (1.3×10(1) to 2.9×10(1)μg/m(3) for indoor; 9.5 to 8.8×10(1)μg/m(3) for outdoor) in the five kindergartens were higher than the guidelines set by the World Health Organization (2...
September 5, 2016: Environment International
Julia Lange, Frederik Weil, Christoph Riegler, Florian Groeber, Silke Rebhan, Szymon Kurdyn, Miriam Alb, Hermann Kneitz, Götz Gelbrich, Heike Walles, Stephan Mielke
Human artificial skin models are increasingly employed as non-animal test platforms for research and medical purposes. However, the overall histopathological quality of such models may vary significantly. Therefore, the effects of manufacturing protocols and donor sources on the quality of skin models built-up from fibroblasts and keratinocytes derived from juvenile foreskins is studied. Histo-morphological parameters such as epidermal thickness, number of epidermal cell layers, dermal thickness, dermo-epidermal adhesion and absence of cellular nuclei in the corneal layer are obtained and scored accordingly...
October 2016: Biotechnology Journal
Hyun-Soo Shin, Yun-Min Kook, Hye Jin Hong, Young-Mo Kim, Won-Gun Koh, Jae-Yol Lim
: Development of a tissue-engineered, salivary bio-gland will benefit patients suffering from xerostomia due to loss of fluid-secreting acinar cells. This study was conducted to develop a bioengineering system to induce self-assembly of human parotid epithelial cells (hPECs) cultured on poly ethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel-micropatterned polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous microwells. Microwells were fabricated by photopatterning of PEG hydrogel in the presence of an electrospun PCL nanofibrous scaffold...
November 2016: Acta Biomaterialia
T Luarte, C C Bonta, E A Silva-Rodriguez, P A Quijón, C Miranda, A A Farias, C Duarte
The continued growth of human activity and infrastructure has translated into a widespread increase in light pollution. Natural daylight and moonlight cycles play a fundamental role for many organisms and ecological processes, so an increase in light pollution may have profound effects on communities and ecosystem services. Studies assessing ecological light pollution (ELP) effects on sandy beach organisms have lagged behind the study of other sources of disturbance. Hence, we assessed the influence of this stressor on locomotor activity, foraging behavior, absorption efficiency and growth rate of adults of the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata...
November 2016: Environmental Pollution
Astgik Petrosyan, Stefano Da Sacco, Nikita Tripuraneni, Ursula Kreuser, Maria Lavarreda-Pearce, Riccardo Tamburrini, Roger E De Filippo, Giuseppe Orlando, Paolo Cravedi, Laura Perin
The outcome of tissue engineered organ transplants depends on the capacity of the biomaterial to promote a pro-healing response once implanted in vivo. Multiple studies, including ours, have demonstrated the possibility of using the extracellular matrix (ECM) of animal organs as platform for tissue engineering and more recently, discarded human organs have also been proposed as scaffold source. In contrast to artificial biomaterials, natural ECM has the advantage of undergoing continuous remodeling which allows adaptation to diverse conditions...
August 26, 2016: Matrix Biology: Journal of the International Society for Matrix Biology
Stefan Fuertinger, Kristina Simonyan
The analysis of the community architecture in functional brain networks has revealed important relations between specific behavioral patterns and characteristic features of the associated functional organization. Numerous studies assessed changes in functional communities during different states of awareness, learning, information processing, and various behavioral patterns. The robustness of detected communities within a network has been an often-discussed topic in complex systems research. However, our knowledge regarding the intersubject stability of functional communities in the human brain while performing different tasks is still lacking...
August 30, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
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