Read by QxMD icon Read

Emergency department chest pain

Shirley J Ingram, Gabrielle McKee, Mary B Quirke, Niamh Kelly, Ashling Moloney
BACKGROUND: Chest pain is a common presentation to emergency departments (EDs). Pathways for patients with non-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) chest pain are not optimal. An advanced cardiology nurse-led chest pain service was commenced to address this. The aim of the study was to assess the outcomes of non-ACS patients discharged from ED to an advanced cardiology nurse-led chest pain clinic and compare by referral type (nurse or ED physician). METHODS: The service consisted of advanced cardiology nurse or ED physician consultation in the ED and discharge to advanced nurse-led chest pain clinic review less than 72 hours after discharge...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
John W Pickering, Jaimi H Greenslade, Louise Cullen, Dylan Flaws, William Parsonage, Sally Aldous, Peter George, Andrew Worster, Peter A Kavsak, Martin P Than
BACKGROUND: -The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) new guidelines to rule-in and rule-out acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the emergency department (ED) include a rapid assessment algorithm based on high-sensitivity cardiac troponin and sampling at zero and one hour. ED physicians require very high sensitivity to confidently rule-out AMI, while cardiologists aim to minimise false positive results. METHODS: -High-sensitivity troponin I (hs-cTnI) and T (hs-cTnT) assays were used to measure troponin concentrations in patients presenting with chest-pain symptoms and being investigated for possible acute coronary syndrome at hospitals in New Zealand, Australia and Canada...
October 17, 2016: Circulation
William R Fox, Deborah B Diercks
Troponins are proteins commonly found in cardiac tissue that are released during myocardial ischemia or necrosis. These troponins can be detected by assays that can then be used to guide clinical decision-making and disposition, especially if the suspected insult is related to acute coronary syndrome. Timing of troponin measurement can be important as elevations may not be detectible immediately after an insult. New assays have been designed to detect troponin con-centrations previously too low to be detected by conventional assays...
March 2016: Clin Exp Emerg Med
W Kelly Wu, Maame Yaa A B Yiadom, Sean P Collins, Wesley H Self, Ken Monahan
INTRODUCTION: A triage cardiology program, in which cardiologists provide consultation to the Emergency Department (ED), may safely reduce admissions. For patients with chest pain, the HEART Pathway may obviate the need for cardiology involvement, unless there is a difference between ED and cardiology assessments. Therefore, in a cohort concurrently evaluated by both specialties, we analyzed discordance between ED and cardiology HEART scores. METHODS: We performed a single-center, cross-sectional, retrospective study of adults presenting to the ED with chest pain who had a documented bedside evaluation by a triage cardiologist...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Sun Hwa Lee, Seokyong Ryu, Seoung Won Choi, Hye Jin Kim, Tae Kyug Kang, Sung Chan Oh, Suk Jin Cho, Jae Hoon Lee, Euy Suk Chung, Myoung Hwan Kim
BACKGROUND: Aortic dissection in pregnancy is relatively rare, but it is often fatal. The estimated incidence of aortic dissection in the general population is 2.9 per 100,000 person-years. Early recognition and treatment of aortic dissections are crucial for survival. Whereas the majority of patients who present with aortic dissection are older than 50 years of age and have a history of hypertension, younger patients with connective tissue disease, bicuspid aortic valves, or a family history of aortic dissection are also at increased risk for developing this condition...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
M Fernanda Bellolio, Lindsey R Sangaralingham, Stephanie R Schilz, Claire M Noel-Miller, Keith D Lind, Pamela Morin, Peter A Noseworthy, Nilay D Shah, Erik P Hess
OBJECTIVES: To compare healthcare utilization including coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), rehospitalization, and rate of subsequent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within 30-days, among patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with chest pain admitted as short-term inpatient (≤2 days) versus observation (in ED observation units combined with in-hospital observation). METHODS: We identified adults diagnosed with acute chest pain in the ED from 2010-2014 using administrative claims from privately insured and Medicare Advantage...
October 14, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Rpsp Santhakumar, P K Ramalingam, K Gayathri, B V Manjunath, N Karuppusamy, B Vetriveeran, S Selvamani, P Vishnuram, Kumar Natarajan
A 38 years old male patient presented to the emergency department with acute severe retrosternal chest pain and was found to have pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient developed new necrotic lung cavities each day due to the dissemination of emboli from the thrombus. The cause of thrombus was found to be protein C deficiency, which is an inherited thrombophilia. The interesting features in this case are multiple lung cavitations and high grade fever, which was attributed to pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient improved symptomatically with anticoagulants and antiplatelets...
May 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Firas Yassin, Chris Sawh, Pankaj Garg
There is increasing role of computed tomographic (CT) in the assessment of acute chest pain in the emergency department especially when the diagnosis is not clear. We report a case where non ECG gated contrast enhanced CT in the emergency department for rule-out of pulmonary embolus guided to the actual diagnosis, which was, acute coronary event, as evidenced by the presence of perfusion defect.
2016: Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal
Wade Skoien, Katie Page, William Parsonage, Sarah Ashover, Tanya Milburn, Louise Cullen
BACKGROUND: The translation of healthcare research into practice is typically challenging and limited in effectiveness. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) identifies 12 domains of behaviour determinants which can be used to understand the principles of behavioural change, a key factor influencing implementation. The Accelerated Chest pain Risk Evaluation (ACRE) project has successfully translated research into practice, by implementing an intervention to improve the assessment of low to intermediate risk patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with chest pain...
October 12, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
Giovanni Teruzzi, Giuseppe Calligaris, Paolo Ravagnani, Daniela Trabattoni, Luca Grancini, Giovanni Monizzi, Alessandro Lualdi, Antonio L Bartorelli
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) accounts approximately for 0.2% of cases of acute coronary syndrome. It is defined "spontaneous" in absence of any coronary wall damage. This disease affects primarily young women in good health, with no risk factors for coronary artery disease, especially during the postpartum period. Since the clinical presentation varies widely from no symptoms to typical angina and sudden cardiac death, SCAD incidence is underestimated.A 40-year-old woman, in the 8th week after delivery, was admitted to our emergency department because of acute chest pain, and a diagnosis of inferior and posterior non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction was made...
October 2016: Giornale Italiano di Cardiologia
Rachel A Lindor, Marysia S Tweet, Kiran A Goyal, Christine M Lohse, Rajiv Gulati, Sharonne N Hayes, Annie T Sadosty
BACKGROUND: Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequently recognized but potentially fatal cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) that disproportionately affects women. Little is currently known about how patients with SCAD initially present. OBJECTIVES: We sought to describe patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms of SCAD to improve providers' awareness and recognition of this condition. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective medical record review of all patients who presented to the ED of a single academic medical center from January 1, 2002 through October 31, 2015 and were subsequently diagnosed with SCAD by angiography...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Katherine Lambe, Judy Currey, Julie Considine
BACKGROUND: Understanding of clinical deterioration of emergency department patients is rapidly evolving. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and nature of vital sign collection and clinical deterioration in emergency care. METHODS: A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from the records of 200 randomly selected adults with presenting complaints of abdominal pain, shortness of breath, chest pain and febrile illness from 1 January to 31 December 2014 at a 22 bed emergency department in Melbourne, Australia...
October 7, 2016: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal: AENJ
Muhammad Abdul Mabood Khalil, Muhammad Salman Ghazni, Jackson Tan, Nazish Naseer, Muhammad Ashhad Ullah Khalil
Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) was first described in 1960. It may occur as a complication of gonadotropin hormone therapy during assisted pregnancy or for primary infertility. A 26-year-old female patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome and primary infertility was treated to conceive. She received intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) along with follicle-stimulating hormone in an outside private clinic. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal and chest pain, loose stool, vomiting, shortness of breath and decreasing urine output...
May 2016: Case Reports in Gastroenterology
Michael T Booker, John O Johnson
PURPOSE: Optimizing the utilization of CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) for the diagnosis and workup of acute chest pain can provide an opportunity to reduce unnecessary radiation and health care system expense. METHODS: An attempt to improve CTPA utilization began by measuring overall department and clinician-specific utilization. This was bolstered by retrospectively evaluating patient charts for pulmonary embolism scoring criteria and D-dimer utilization so as to better understand gaps in diagnostic workup...
October 4, 2016: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
Chung-Lieh Hung, Ding-Kuo Chien, Shou-Chuan Shih, Wen-Han Chang
BACKGROUND: Accurate diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a timely fashion is challenging in the elderly population, especially elderly women, who usually exhibit atypical clinical symptoms. A multiple cardiac biomarker (MCB) based approach has been shown to improve diagnostic efficacy of ACS. However, data in various age groups and sex differences remain largely unexplored. METHODS: Point-of-care testing (POCT) was performed on 290 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were admitted to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms of acute chest pain under suspicion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS)...
October 7, 2016: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Lieke J J Klinkenberg, Karin Wildi, Noreen van der Linden, Imre W K Kouw, Marijke Niens, Raphael Twerenbold, Maria Rubini Gimenez, Christian Puelacher, Jean Daniel Neuhaus, Petra Hillinger, Thomas Nestelberger, Jasper Boeddinghaus, Karin Grimm, Zaid Sabti, Judith A P Bons, Jeroen D E van Suijlen, Frans E S Tan, Joop Ten Kate, Otto Bekers, Luc J C van Loon, Marja P van Dieijen-Visser, Christian Mueller, Steven J R Meex
BACKGROUND: Interpretation of serial high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) measurements for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) assumes random fluctuation of hs-cTn around an individual's homeostatic set point. The aim of this study was to challenge this diagnostic concept. METHODS: Study 1 examined the presence of a diurnal hs-cTn rhythm by hourly blood sampling, day and night, in 24 individuals without a recent history of AMI. Study 2 assessed morning vs evening diagnostic accuracy of hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI in a prospective multicenter diagnostic study of 2782 unselected patients, presenting to the emergency department with acute chest pain...
October 5, 2016: Clinical Chemistry
Kalkan Asim, Yeniocak Selman, Yazici Suleyman, Karcioglu Ozgur, Bilir Ozlem, Ersunan Gokhan
INTRODUCTION: Lithium overdose can be associated with cardiac toxicity, especially in those with underlying heart disease. Toxic levels of serum lithium are associated with cardiotoxic effects ranging from simple ECG disorders to dysrhythmias, cardiomyopathy and even acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This report describes a patient with AMI accompanied by high blood levels of lithium. CASE PRESENTATION: A 62-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department due to weakness and acute chest pain...
July 2016: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal
Janet A Smereck, Argyro Papafilippaki, Sawali Sudarshan
Bench press exercise, which involves repetitive lifting of weights to full arm extension while lying supine on a narrow bench, has been associated with complications ranging in acuity from simple pectoral muscle strain, to aortic and coronary artery dissection. A 39-year-old man, physically fit and previously asymptomatic, presented with acute chest pain following bench press exercise. Diagnostic evaluation led to the discovery of critical multivessel coronary occlusive disease, and subsequently, highly elevated levels of lipoprotein (a)...
2016: Open Access Emergency Medicine: OAEM
Ankit H Shah, Vivek Bogale, David Hurst, Gregory dePrisco
Acute chest pain is one of the most common reasons for presentation to the emergency department. Although most etiologies of chest pain are easy to clinically ascertain with routine history, physical, and laboratory examinations, we present an important benign cause of acute chest pain that may mimic acute coronary syndrome.
October 2016: Proceedings of the Baylor University Medical Center
O Nallet, N Ketata, N Ferrier, X Marcaggi
Acute chest pain is a common reason of consultation in the emergency department. The difficulty lies in discriminating patients with acute coronary syndrome or other life-threatening conditions from those non-cardiovascular, non-life-threatening chest pain. Only 15 to 25 % of patients with acute chest pain actually have acute coronary syndrome. Algorithms using high sensitivity troponin at admission and a second assessment 1 or 3hours later are validated to "rule in" or "rule out" the diagnosis of non ST-elevation myocardial infarction...
September 29, 2016: Annales de Cardiologie et D'angéiologie
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"