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Adult health

Matthew E Dupre, Alicia Nelson
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly one million Americans will have a heart attack this year. Although the risks associated with a heart attack are well established, we know surprisingly little about how marital factors contribute to survival in adults afflicted with heart disease. This study uses a life course perspective and longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study to examine how various dimensions of marital life influence survival in U.S. older adults who suffered a heart attack (n = 2197)...
October 15, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Ibrahim Oghli, Thomas List, Mike John, Pernilla Larsson
OBJECTIVES: To (i) determine the prevalences of self-report in a Swedish adult population, of temporomandibular disorders, burning mouth syndrome, dry mouth, and bad breath and (ii) determine oral health-related quality of life impairment in subjects reporting these conditions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional, randomized sample of the adult Swedish population (response rate: 46%, N=1309 subjects) self-reported their condition from the preceding month to assess prevalences of self-report for the studied conditions together with comorbidity group of subjects who reported more than one condition...
October 22, 2016: Oral Diseases
C Teljeur, P S Moran, S Walshe, S M Smith, F Cianci, L Murphy, P Harrington, M Ryan
AIMS: To systematically review the evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. BACKGROUND: Self-management support is the provision of education and supportive interventions to increase patients' skills and confidence in managing their health problems, potentially leading to improvements in HbA1c levels in people with diabetes. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials, observational studies or economic modelling studies were eligible for inclusion in the review...
October 22, 2016: Diabetic Medicine: a Journal of the British Diabetic Association
Wai Jia Tam, Philip Yap
Approximately two-thirds of the world's older adults live in developing nations. By 2050, as many as 80% of such older people will live in low- and middle-income countries. In sub-Saharan Africa alone, the number of individuals aged 60 and older is projected to reach 163 million. Despite this demographic wave, the majority of Africa has limited access to qualified geriatric health care.(3) Although foreign aid and capacity-building efforts can help to close this gap over time, it is likely that failure to understand the unique context of Africa's older adults, many of whom are marginalized, will lead to inadequacies in service delivery and poor health outcomes...
October 22, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Shanna Cheng, Elton Li, Anna S Lok
Despite guidelines recommending hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening among the Asian population, not all Asians are screened. We assessed barriers to and factors predicting HBV screening in Michigan. Adults residing in Southeast Michigan self-identifying as Asian were surveyed at Asian grocery stores, restaurants, churches, and community events. 404 persons participated in the survey, 54 % were women, median age was 51 years, 63 % were Chinese, and 93.8 % were born outside the U.S. 181 (44.8 %) had not or could not recall having been screened for HBV...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Carmen Byker Shanks, Sarah Haack, Dawn Tarabochia, Kate Bates, Lori Christenson
Nutrition is an essential component in promoting health and quality of life into the older adults years. The purpose of this qualitative research is to explore how the rural food environment influences food choices of older adults. Four focus groups were conducted with 33 older adults (50 years of age and older) residing in rural Montana communities. Four major themes related to factors influencing food choices among rural older adults emerged from this study: perception of the rural community environment, support as a means of increasing food access, personal access to food sources, and dietary factors...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Jonathan Delman, Vanessa V Klodnick
Peer providers are a promising practice for transition-age youth community mental health treatment engagement and support, yet little is known about the experience of being a young adult peer provider or what helps to make an individual in this role successful. Utilizing a capital theory lens, this study uses data from focus groups (two with young adult peer providers and two with their supervisors) to examine facilitators of young adult peer provider success in community mental health treatment settings. Eight factors were identified as critical to young adult peer provider on-the-job success: persistence, job confidence, resilience, job training, skilled communications with colleagues, regular and individualized supervision, support from colleagues, and family support...
October 22, 2016: Community Mental Health Journal
Jaana Alakortes, Susanna Kovaniemi, Alice S Carter, Risto Bloigu, Irma K Moilanen, Hanna E Ebeling
Growing evidence supports the existence of clinically significant social-emotional/behavioral (SEB) problems among as young as 1-year-old infants. However, a substantial proportion of early SEB problems remain unidentified during contacts with child healthcare professionals. In this study, child healthcare nurse (CHCN; N = 1008) and parental (N = 518) reports about SEB worries were gathered, along with the maternal and paternal Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) ratings, for 12-month-old infants randomly recruited through Finnish child health centers...
October 21, 2016: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
E Laird, T Shannon, V E F Crowley, M Healy
CONTEXT: There have been few published reports of visualising vitamin D status at a micro level, i.e., within large individual urban centres of countries. OBJECTIVE: To produce a visual map of the vitamin D status [25-hydroxy vitamin D-25(OH)D] of a large urban centre (n > 350,000) incorporating the regions of Dublin city that constitute the general practitioner catchment area of a large academic teaching adult hospital. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: An observational investigation of 5287 free living Irish adults (>18 years)...
October 21, 2016: Irish Journal of Medical Science
Hisham Hussan, Peter P Stanich, Darrell M Gray, Somashekar G Krishna, Kyle Porter, Darwin L Conwell, Steven K Clinton
BACKGROUND: Morbid obesity is associated with worse colorectal cancer (CRC) perioperative outcomes. The impact of bariatric surgery on these outcomes is unknown. METHODS: The National Inpatient Sample Database (2006-2012) was used to identify adults with prior bariatric surgery (divided into BMI ≤35 kg/m(2) and BMI >35 kg/m(2)) or morbid obesity that underwent CRC surgery. Main outcomes were mortality, surgical complications and health care utilization. RESULTS: There were 1813 patients with prior bariatric surgery and 22,552 morbidly obese patients that underwent CRC surgery between 2006 and 2012...
October 21, 2016: Obesity Surgery
Walter Pirker, Regina Katzenschlager
Human gait depends on a complex interplay of major parts of the nervous, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems. The individual gait pattern is influenced by age, personality, mood and sociocultural factors. The preferred walking speed in older adults is a sensitive marker of general health and survival. Safe walking requires intact cognition and executive control. Gait disorders lead to a loss of personal freedom, falls and injuries and result in a marked reduction in the quality of life. Acute onset of a gait disorder may indicate a cerebrovascular or other acute lesion in the nervous system but also systemic diseases or adverse effects of medication, in particular polypharmacy including sedatives...
October 21, 2016: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift
Julia Diehle, Samantha K Brooks, Neil Greenberg
PURPOSE: Previous research has mainly focused on veterans' mental health problems, especially on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Less is known about the impact that the veteran's experienced potentially traumatic events (PTEs) might have on their significant others. Therefore, we reviewed the scientific literature to find out what is known about the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in significant others of veterans. METHODS: We systematically searched Pubmed, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library and PILOTS for relevant articles...
October 21, 2016: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Daniel S Olsson, Penelope Trimpou, Tobias Hallén, Ing-Liss Bryngelsson, Eva Andersson, Thomas Skoglund, Bengt-Åke Bengtsson, Gudmundur Johannsson, Anna G Nilsson
Hypopituitarism has been associated with an increased mortality, which may be due to untreated growth hormone (GH) deficiency but also to the various underlying disorders. We therefore analysed mortality in patients with only one underlying disorder, non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA), with and without GH replacement therapy (GHRT). Patients with NFPA in the western region of Sweden, 1997-2011, were identified through the National Patient Registry and cross-referenced with several National Health Registries...
October 21, 2016: European Journal of Endocrinology
Denise M Hynes, Michael Fischer, Linda A Schiffer, Rani Gallardo, Ifeanyi Beverly Chukwudozie, Anna Porter, Michael Berbaum, Jennifer Earheart, Marian L Fitzgibbon
INTRODUCTION: Using a quasi-experimental design, we implemented the Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD), a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve quality of life and healthcare coordination for adult chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. This paper highlights our experience in the first two years of the study.We focus on the process dimensions of Reach, Adoption, and Implementation within the context of the RE-AIM framework. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a new PCMH-KD model at two outpatient dialysis centers...
October 18, 2016: Contemporary Clinical Trials
David M Cykert, Joni S Williams, Rebekah J Walker, Kimberly S Davis, Leonard E Egede
AIMS: Discrimination is linked to negative health outcomes, but little research has investigated how the cumulative effect of discrimination impacts perceptions of care. This study investigated the influence of cumulative perceived discrimination on quality of care, patient-centeredness, and dissatisfaction with care in adults with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Six hundred two patients from two primary care clinics in Charleston, SC. Linear regression models assessed associations between perceived discrimination and quality of care, patient-centered care, and dissatisfaction with care...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
Adèle Coriati, Évelyne Labrèche, Marjolaine Mailhot, Hortensia Mircescu, Yves Berthiaume, Annick Lavoie, Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Vitamin D (Vit D) deficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF) is partially secondary to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Our aim was to establish a Vit D3 supplementation protocol that will increase 25(OH)D to the recommended level (30 ng/mL). METHODS: Retrospective study of 200 patients (≥18 years) conducted from February 2007 to June 2014 at the CF clinic of the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal. Vit D3 supplementation protocol was 1600 IU/day or 10,000 IU/week during the summer (May 1st to October 31st) and 3200 IU/day or 20,000 IU/week during the winter (November 1st to April 30th), in addition to the 1200 IU/day included in multivitamins...
October 8, 2016: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Abby R Rosenberg, Kira Bona, Tyler Ketterl, Claire M Wharton, Joanne Wolfe, K Scott Baker
PURPOSE: The prevalence of intimacy and substance use among adolescents and young adults during cancer therapy has not been well described. METHODS: The "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer" study was a prospective, multicenter, mixed-methods cohort study. English-speaking patients 14-25 years old with newly diagnosed cancer were invited to complete a comprehensive survey at the time of enrollment (T1) and 3-6 months later (T2). Intimate relationships and health behaviors were assessed with questions adapted from the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventative Services assessment...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Adolescent Health: Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Sally Lindsay, Laura McAdam, Tania Mahendiran
BACKGROUND: Young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) live into adulthood and need specialized care. However, services for adults are fragmented. We know little about young men's experiences, their parents, and clinicians who support them as they transition to adult care. OBJECTIVE: To explore the enablers and barriers of clinicians, young men, and parents as they transition from an adult DMD clinic within a pediatric hospital to an adult health facility...
October 11, 2016: Disability and Health Journal
Maria Celeste Buompadre, Kathleen Andres, Lee-Anne Slater, Hadi Mohseni-Bod, Anne-Marie Guerguerian, Helen Branson, Suzanne Laughlin, Derek Armstrong, Mahendranath Moharir, Gabrielle deVeber, Tilman Humpl, Osami Honjo, Shaf Keshavjee, Rebecca Ichord, Vitor Pereira, Nomazulu Dlamini
The updated American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines include recommendation for thrombectomy in certain adult stroke cases. The safety and efficacy of thrombectomy in children are unknown. An 8-year-old girl experienced acute stroke symptoms on two occasions while therapeutically anticoagulated on Novalung. Computed tomography scans showed proximal vessel thrombi, which were retrieved using a Trevo device without hemorrhagic complications. Postprocedural assessment found respective decreases in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score from 10 to 4 and 12 to 7...
September 14, 2016: Pediatric Neurology
A Amaddeo, L de Sanctis, J Olmo Arroyo, J-P Giordanella, P-J Monteyrol, B Fauroux
Obesity, along with hypertrophy of the adenoids and the tonsils, represents one of the major risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Obesity is associated with an increase in the prevalence and the severity of OSA and is a major factor in the persistence and aggravation of OSA over time. Neurocognitive dysfunction and abnormal behavior are the most important and frequent end-organ morbidities associated with OSA in children. Other deleterious consequences such as cardiovascular stress and metabolic syndrome are less common in children than in adults with OSA...
October 18, 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
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