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Magnetoencephalography

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424797/magnetoencephalography-as-a-tool-in-psychiatric-research-current-status-and-perspective
#1
REVIEW
Peter J Uhlhaas, Peter Liddle, David E J Linden, Anna C Nobre, Krish D Singh, Joachim Gross
The application of neuroimaging to provide mechanistic insights into circuit dysfunctions in major psychiatric conditions and the development of biomarkers are core challenges in current psychiatric research. We propose that recent technological and analytic advances in magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that allows measurement of neuronal events directly and noninvasively with millisecond resolution, provides novel opportunities to address these fundamental questions. Because of its potential in delineating normal and abnormal brain dynamics, we propose that MEG provides a crucial tool to advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and the dementias...
April 2017: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424604/mapping-critical-language-sites-in-children-performing-verb-generation-whole-brain-connectivity-and-graph-theoretical-analysis-in-meg
#2
Vahab Youssofzadeh, Brady J Williamson, Darren S Kadis
A classic left frontal-temporal brain network is known to support language processes. However, the level of participation of constituent regions, and the contribution of extra-canonical areas, is not fully understood; this is particularly true in children, and in individuals who have experienced early neurological insult. In the present work, we propose whole-brain connectivity and graph-theoretical analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) source estimates to provide robust maps of the pediatric expressive language network...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420951/shared-neural-mechanisms-for-the-prediction-of-own-and-partner-musical-sequences-after-short-term-piano-duet-training
#3
Claudia Lappe, Sabine Bodeck, Markus Lappe, Christo Pantev
Predictive mechanisms in the human brain can be investigated using markers for prediction violations like the mismatch negativity (MMN). Short-term piano training increases the MMN for melodic and rhythmic deviations in the training material. This increase occurs only when the material is actually played, not when it is only perceived through listening, suggesting that learning predictions about upcoming musical events are derived from motor involvement. However, music is often performed in concert with others...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411273/low-frequency-cortical-oscillations-entrain-to-sub-threshold-rhythmic-auditory-stimuli
#4
Sanne Ten Oever, Charles E Schroeder, David Poeppel, Nienke van Atteveldt, Ashesh D Mehta, Pierre Mégevand, David M Groppe, Elana Zion-Golumbic
Many environmental stimuli contain temporal regularities, a feature which can help predict forthcoming input. Phase-locking (entrainment) of ongoing low-frequency neuronal oscillations to rhythmic stimuli is proposed as a potential mechanism for enhancing neuronal responses and perceptual sensitivity, by aligning high-excitability phases to events within a stimulus stream. Previous experiments show that rhythmic structure has a behavioral benefit even when the rhythm itself is below perceptual detection thresholds (Ten Oever et al...
April 14, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28410055/olfactory-recognition-based-on-eeg-gamma-band-activity
#5
Onder Aydemir
There are various kinds of brain monitoring techniques, including local field potential, near-infrared spectroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, functional MRI, electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography. Among those techniques, EEG is the most widely used one due to its portability, low setup cost, and noninvasiveness. Apart from other advantages, EEG signals also help to evaluate the ability of the smelling organ. In such studies, EEG signals, which are recorded during smelling, are analyzed to determine the subject lacks any smelling ability or to measure the response of the brain...
April 14, 2017: Neural Computation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28408294/resilience-and-cross-network-connectivity-a-neural-model-for-post-trauma-survival
#6
Brunetti Marcella, Marzetti Laura, Sepede Gianna, Zappasodi Filippo, Pizzella Vittorio, Sarchione Fabiola, Vellante Federica, Martinotti Giovanni, Di Giannantonio Massimo
Literature on the neurobiological bases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) considers medial Prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a core region of the Default Mode Network (DMN), as a region involved in response regulation to stressors. Disrupted functioning of the DMN has been recognized at the basis of the pathophysiology of a number of mental disorders. Furthermore, in the evaluation of the protective factors to trauma consequence, an important role has been assigned to resilience. Our aim was to investigate the specific relation of resilience and PTSD symptoms severity with resting state brain connectivity in a traumatized population using magnetoencephalography (MEG), a non-invasive imaging technique with high temporal resolution and documented advantages in clinical applications...
April 10, 2017: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407064/the-influence-of-eye-closure-on-somatosensory-discrimination-a-trade-off-between-simple-perception-and-discrimination
#7
Theresa Götz, David Hanke, Ralph Huonker, Thomas Weiss, Carsten Klingner, Stefan Brodoehl, Philipp Baumbach, Otto W Witte
We often close our eyes to improve perception. Recent results have shown a decrease of perception thresholds accompanied by an increase in somatosensory activity after eye closure. However, does somatosensory spatial discrimination also benefit from eye closure? We previously showed that spatial discrimination is accompanied by a reduction of somatosensory activity. Using magnetoencephalography, we analyzed the magnitude of primary somatosensory (somatosensory P50m) and primary auditory activity (auditory P50m) during a one-back discrimination task in 21 healthy volunteers...
April 12, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402479/perception-of-social-synchrony-induces-mother-child-gamma-coupling-in-the-social-brain
#8
Jonathan Levy, Abraham Goldstein, Ruth Feldman
The recent call to move from focus on one brain's functioning to two-brain communication initiated a search for mechanisms that enable two humans to coordinate brain response during social interactions. Here, we utilized the mother-child context as a developmentally salient setting to study two-brain coupling. Mothers and their 9-year-old children were videotaped at home in positive and conflictual interactions. Positive interactions were microcoded for social synchrony and conflicts for overall dialogical style...
April 11, 2017: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400725/cortical-mechanisms-of-tongue-sensorimotor-functions-in-humans-a-review-of-the-magnetoencephalography-approach
#9
REVIEW
Hitoshi Maezawa
The tongue plays important roles in a variety of critical human oral functions, including speech production, swallowing, mastication and respiration. These sophisticated tongue movements are in part finely regulated by cortical entrainment. Many studies have examined sensorimotor processing in the limbs using magnetoencephalography (MEG), which has high spatiotemporal resolution. Such studies have employed multiple methods of analysis, including somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs), movement-related cortical fields (MRCFs), event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) associated with somatosensory stimulation or movement and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) during sustained movement...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399506/timing-and-type-of-hemispherectomy-for-rasmussen-s-encephalitis-analysis-of-45-patients
#10
Yuguang Guan, Sichang Chen, Changqing Liu, Xiuyu Du, Yao Zhang, Shuai Chen, Jie Wang, Tianfu Li, Guoming Luan
OBJECTIVE: To describe the surgery outcomes of RE patients in one centerto identify the indication for surgical treatment that results in the most favorable outcome. METHOD: Forty-five RE patients from a single center were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative evaluations included assessments of clinical manifestations, cognitive status, a physical examination, MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG)...
March 22, 2017: Epilepsy Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397108/prevalence-and-function-of-heschl-s-gyrus-morphotypes-in-musicians
#11
Jan Benner, Martina Wengenroth, Julia Reinhardt, Christoph Stippich, Peter Schneider, Maria Blatow
Morphological variations of the first transverse Heschl's gyrus (HG) in the human auditory cortex (AC) are common, yet little is known about their functional implication. We investigated individual morphology and function of HG variations in the AC of 41 musicians, using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG). Four main morphotypes of HG were (i) single HG, (ii) common stem duplication (CSD), (iii) complete posterior duplication (CPD), and (iv) multiple duplications (MD)...
April 10, 2017: Brain Structure & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393878/frequency-dependent-oscillatory-neural-profiles-during-imitation
#12
Hisato Sugata, Masayuki Hirata, Yuichi Tamura, Hisao Onishi, Tetsu Goto, Toshihiko Araki, Shiro Yorifuji
Imitation is a complex process that includes higher-order cognitive and motor function. This process requires an observation-execution matching system that transforms an observed action into an identical movement. Although the low-gamma band is thought to reflect higher cognitive processes, no studies have focused on it. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory changes including the low-gamma band during imitation. Twelve healthy, right-handed participants performed a finger task consisting of four conditions (imitation, execution, observation, and rest)...
April 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390167/brain-structure-and-verbal-function-across-adulthood-while-controlling-for-cerebrovascular-risks
#13
L Sanfratello, S L Lundy, C Qualls, J E Knoefel, J C Adair, A Caprihan, J M Stephen, C J Aine
The development and decline of brain structure and function throughout adulthood is a complex issue, with cognitive aging trajectories influenced by a host of factors including cerebrovascular risk. Neuroimaging studies of age-related cognitive decline typically reveal a linear decrease in gray matter (GM) volume/density in frontal regions across adulthood. However, white matter (WM) tracts mature later than GM, particularly in regions necessary for executive functions and memory. Therefore, it was predicted that a middle-aged group (MC: 35-45 years) would perform best on a verbal working memory task and reveal greater regional WM integrity, compared with both young (YC: 18-25 years) and elder groups (EC: 60+ years)...
April 8, 2017: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389383/flexible-rapid-and-automatic-neocortical-word-form-acquisition-mechanism-in-children-as-revealed-by-neuromagnetic-brain-response-dynamics
#14
Eino Partanen, Alina Leminen, Stine de Paoli, Anette Bundgaard, Osman Skjold Kingo, Peter Krøjgaard, Yury Shtyrov
Children learn new words and word forms with ease, often acquiring a new word after very few repetitions. Recent neurophysiological research on word form acquisition in adults indicates that novel words can be acquired within minutes of repetitive exposure to them, regardless of the individual's focused attention on the speech input. Although it is well-known that children surpass adults in language acquisition, the developmental aspects of such rapid and automatic neural acquisition mechanisms remain unexplored...
April 4, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383970/visual-short-term-memory-related-brain-activity-predicts-mathematical-abilities
#15
Aubrée Boulet-Craig, Philippe Robaey, Karine Lacourse, Karim Jerbi, Victor Oswald, Maja Krajinovic, Caroline Laverdière, Daniel Sinnett, Pierre Jolicoeur, Sarah Lippé
OBJECTIVE: Previous research suggests visual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity and mathematical abilities are significantly related. Moreover, both processes activate similar brain regions within the parietal cortex, in particular, the intraparietal sulcus; however, it is still unclear whether the neuronal underpinnings of VSTM directly correlate with mathematical operation and reasoning abilities. The main objective was to investigate the association between parieto-occipital brain activity during the retention period of a VSTM task and performance in mathematics...
April 6, 2017: Neuropsychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28369363/noninvasive-stimulation-of-the-ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex-enhances-pleasant-scene-processing
#16
Markus Junghofer, Constantin Winker, Maimu A Rehbein, Dean Sabatinelli
Depressive patients typically show biased attention towards unpleasant and away from pleasant emotional material. Imaging studies suggest that dysfunctions in a distributed neural network, including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), are associated with this processing bias. Accordingly, changes in vmPFC activation should mediate changes in processing of emotional stimuli. Here, we investigated the effect of inhibitory and excitatory transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the vmPFC on emotional scene processing in two within-subject experiments using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG)...
March 25, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28367127/alterations-of-intrinsic-brain-connectivity-patterns-in-depression-and-bipolar-disorders-a-critical-assessment-of-magnetoencephalography-based-evidence
#17
REVIEW
Golnoush Alamian, Ana-Sofía Hincapié, Etienne Combrisson, Thomas Thiery, Véronique Martel, Dmitrii Althukov, Karim Jerbi
Despite being the object of a thriving field of clinical research, the investigation of intrinsic brain network alterations in psychiatric illnesses is still in its early days. Because the pathological alterations are predominantly probed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), many questions about the electrophysiological bases of resting-state alterations in psychiatric disorders, particularly among mood disorder patients, remain unanswered. Alongside important research using electroencephalography (EEG), the specific recent contributions and future promise of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in this field are not fully recognized and valued...
2017: Frontiers in Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358658/supramodal-theta-gamma-and-sustained-fields-predict-modality-specific-modulations-of-alpha-and-beta-oscillations-during-visual-and-tactile-working-memory
#18
Freek van Ede, Ole Jensen, Eric Maris
Flexible control over currently relevant sensory representations is an essential feature of primate cognition. We investigated the neurophysiological bases of such flexible control in humans during an intermodal working memory task in which participants retained visual or tactile sequences. Using magnetoencephalography, we first show that working memory retention engages early visual and somatosensory areas, as reflected in the sustained load-dependent suppression of alpha and beta oscillations. Next, we identify three components that are also load dependent but modality independent: medial prefrontal theta synchronization, frontoparietal gamma synchronization, and sustained parietal event-related fields...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343887/corrigendum-to-magnetoencephalography-signals-are-influenced-by-skull-defects-clin-neurophysiol-125-2014-1653-1662
#19
S Lau, L Flemming, J Haueisen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 23, 2017: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341164/expectation-violation-and-attention-to-pain-jointly-modulate-neural-gain-in-somatosensory-cortex
#20
Francesca Fardo, Ryszard Auksztulewicz, Micah Allen, Martin J Dietz, Andreas Roepstorff, Karl J Friston
The neural processing and experience of pain are influenced by both expectations and attention. For example, the amplitude of event-related pain responses is enhanced by both novel and unexpected pain, and by moving the focus of attention towards a painful stimulus. Under predictive coding, this congruence can be explained by appeal to a precision-weighting mechanism, which mediates bottom-up and top-down attentional processes by modulating the influence of feedforward and feedback signals throughout the cortical hierarchy...
March 21, 2017: NeuroImage
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