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Chemotherapy induced alopecia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28738048/scalp-cooling-the-prevention-of-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia%C3%A2
#1
Anne Katz
Hair loss (alopecia) from chemotherapy is one of the most feared side effects of many patients, particularly women. Many patients and their healthcare providers believe that cryotherapy can help prevent or mitigate these changes. Scalp cooling has been used for more than 30 years to prevent alopecia caused by chemotherapy, particularly taxanes and anthracyclines. This article presents an overview of the evidence for this strategy, as well as its impact on nursing care provision.
August 1, 2017: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720262/nothing-is-more-important-than-my-partner-s-health-turkish-men-s-perspectives-on-partner-s-appearance-after-mastectomy-and-alopecia
#2
Ayla Gürsoy, Sema Koçan, Cemile Aktuğ
PURPOSES: The aim of this study was to acquire a deeper understanding of male experiences on the emotional and social impact of their partners' mastectomy and chemotherapy-induced alopecia. METHODS: A purposive sample of 16 males whose partners had undergone mastectomy and alopecia due to chemotherapy was chosen. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview method. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of tape-recorded interviews was employed. RESULTS: Two main themes emerged from the data: facing the changes and my wife and I at present...
August 2017: European Journal of Oncology Nursing: the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685843/oxidative-stress-management-in-the-hair-follicle-could-targeting-nrf2-counter-age-related-hair-disorders-and-beyond
#3
REVIEW
Laura Jadkauskaite, Pierre A Coulombe, Matthias Schäfer, Albena T Dinkova-Kostova, Ralf Paus, Iain S Haslam
Widespread expression of the transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), which maintains redox homeostasis, has recently been identified in the hair follicle (HF). Small molecule activators of NRF2 may therefore be useful in the management of HF pathologies associated with redox imbalance, ranging from HF greying and HF ageing via androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata to chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Indeed, NRF2 activation has been shown to prevent peroxide-induced hair growth inhibition...
August 2017: BioEssays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607955/wound-healing-protects-against-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia-in-young-rats-via-up-regulating-interleukin-1%C3%AE-mediated-signaling
#4
Olivera Stojadinovic, Tongyu C Wikramanayake, Alexandra C Villasante Fricke, Natalie C Yin, Liang Liang, Eleanor Hinde, Julia Escandon, Marjana Tomic-Canic, David M Ansell, Ralf Paus, Joaquin J Jimenez
Wound healing is a complex process regulated by various cell types and a plethora of mediators. While interactions between wounded skin and the hair follicles (HFs) could induce HF neogenesis or promote wound healing, it remains unknown whether the wound healing-associated signaling milieu can be manipulated to protect against alopecia, such as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). Utilizing a well-established neonatal rat model of CIA, we show here that skin wounding protects from alopecia caused by several clinically relevant chemotherapeutic regimens, and that protection is dependent on the time of wounding and hair cycle stage...
May 2017: Heliyon
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542687/chemotherapy-induced-hair-loss-alopecia
#5
Howard Jack West
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 1, 2017: JAMA Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424440/gemcitabine-induced-coronary-vasospasm-a-case-report
#6
Mahmut Tuna Katırcıbaşı, Aynur Eken
Gemcitabine is a chemotherapy drug. It is a nucleoside analogue that is usually well tolerated by patients, with myelosuppression (especially thrombocytopenia) as dose-limiting side effect. Other mild to moderate side effects include alopecia, vomiting, nausea, rash, and fever. Coronary ischemia is the most common cardiotoxic effect of gemcitabine, which is due to its antimetabolites. While underlying cause of coronary ischemia following use of gemcitabine is uncertain, endothelial dysfunction and coronary thrombosis are potential explanations...
March 2017: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneği Arşivi: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneğinin Yayın Organıdır
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324267/chemotherapy-induced-irreversible-alopecia-in-early-breast-cancer-patients
#7
Gun Min Kim, Sanghwa Kim, Hyung Seok Park, Jee Ye Kim, Sanggen Nam, Seho Park, Seung Il Kim, DoYoung Kim, Joohyuk Sohn
PURPOSE: The purpose of this work is to determine the prevalence of chemotherapy-induced irreversible alopecia (CIIA), which is defined as an alopecia that exists at least 6 months after completion of chemotherapy and factors affecting CIIA in early breast cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study. We retrospectively identified breast cancer patients who had received AC (Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide) or AC-T (AC followed by Taxane) as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy...
March 21, 2017: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315539/scalp-cooling-a-literature-review-of-efficacy-safety-and-tolerability-for-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia%C3%A2
#8
Mikel Ross, Erica Fischer-Cartlidge
BACKGROUND: More than 75% of patients with cancer cite alopecia as the most feared side effect of treatment, with as many as 10% considering treatment refusal. Despite wide acceptance in other countries, scalp cooling to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) has been uncommon in the United States because of longstanding concerns of scalp metastases and a lack of reliable efficacy data. 
. OBJECTIVES: This article reviews 40 years of efficacy, safety, and tolerability literature on scalp cooling to prevent CIA...
April 1, 2017: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284826/permanent-alopecia-in-patients-with-breast-cancer-after-taxane-chemotherapy-and-adjuvant-hormonal-therapy-clinicopathologic-findings-in-a-cohort-of-10-patients
#9
Athina Fonia, Carlo Cota, Jane F Setterfield, Lynne J Goldberg, David A Fenton, Catherine M Stefanato
BACKGROUND: Anagen effluvium with reversible scalp alopecia is a known side effect of chemotherapy. However, there are an increasing number of reports in the literature documenting permanent alopecia in patients treated with taxanes. OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe the clinicopathologic features in breast cancer patients who underwent treatment with taxanes and adjuvant hormonal chemotherapy. METHODS: We reviewed the clinical and histopathologic information of a cohort of 10 patients treated with taxanes and adjuvant hormonal chemotherapy...
May 2017: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196257/association-between-use-of-a-scalp-cooling-device-and-alopecia-after-chemotherapy-for-breast-cancer
#10
MULTICENTER STUDY
Hope S Rugo, Paula Klein, Susan Anitra Melin, Sara A Hurvitz, Michelle E Melisko, Anne Moore, Glen Park, Jules Mitchel, Erika Bågeman, Ralph B D'Agostino, Elizabeth S Ver Hoeve, Laura Esserman, Tessa Cigler
Importance: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing adverse effect. In previous studies of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, conclusions have been limited. Objectives: To evaluate whether use of a scalp cooling system is associated with a lower amount of hair loss among women receiving specific chemotherapy regimens for early-stage breast cancer and to assess related changes in quality of life. Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective cohort study conducted at 5 US medical centers of women with stage I or II breast cancer receiving adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens excluding sequential or combination anthracycline and taxane (106 patients in the scalp cooling group and 16 in the control group; 14 matched by both age and chemotherapy regimen)...
February 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196254/effect-of-a-scalp-cooling-device-on-alopecia-in-women-undergoing-chemotherapy-for-breast-cancer-the-scalp-randomized-clinical-trial
#11
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Julie Nangia, Tao Wang, Cynthia Osborne, Polly Niravath, Kristen Otte, Steven Papish, Frankie Holmes, Jame Abraham, Mario Lacouture, Jay Courtright, Richard Paxman, Mari Rude, Susan Hilsenbeck, C Kent Osborne, Mothaffar Rimawi
Importance: Chemotherapy may induce alopecia. Although scalp cooling devices have been used to prevent this alopecia, efficacy has not been assessed in a randomized clinical trial. Objectives: To assess whether a scalp cooling device is effective at reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia and to assess adverse treatment effects. Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter randomized clinical trial of women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy...
February 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196237/scalp-cooling-to-prevent-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia-the-time-has-come
#12
EDITORIAL
Dawn L Hershman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28156603/benefits-of-cover-makeup-for-survivors
#13
Yuji Heike
259 Background: Cancer therapy causes various appearance changes, such as chemotherapy-induced alopecia and skin pigmentation. These events decrease cancer survivors' QoL (quality of life), and sometimes deprive them of social life and work opportunities. Even though wigs are commonly accessible to care hair loss, the way has not been established to care visual changes in skin. Our previous interview survey revealed that visual changes in skin depressed cancer survivors and their daily life were also interrupted, e...
October 9, 2016: Journal of Clinical Oncology: Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150447/chemotherapy-induced-alopecia-management-clinical-experience-and-practical-advice
#14
Alfredo Rossi, Maria Caterina Fortuna, Gemma Caro, Giulia Pranteda, Valentina Garelli, Umberto Pompili, Marta Carlesimo
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is probably one of the most shocking aspects for oncological patients and underestimated by physicians. Among hair loss risk factors, there are treatment-related aspects such as drug dose, administration regimen, and exposure to X-rays, but also patient-related characteristics. To the best of our knowledge, no guidelines are available about CIA management. AIMS AND METHODS: With this study, based on literature background and our clinical experience, we would like to propose a list of actions in order to estimate the risk of hair loss before starting chemotherapy and to manage this condition before, during, and after drug administration and to create a sort of practical guide for dermatologists and oncologists...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050147/sensor-controlled-scalp-cooling-to-prevent-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia-in-female-cancer-patients
#15
M K Fehr, J Welter, W Sell, R Jung, R Felberbaum
BACKGROUND: Scalp cooling has been used since the 1970s to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, one of the most common and psychologically troubling side effects of chemotherapy. Currently available scalp cooling systems demonstrate varying results in terms of effectiveness and tolerability. METHODS: For the present prospective study, 55 women receiving neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a sensor-controlled scalp cooling system (DigniCap: Sysmex Europe GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast or gynecologic cancer patients receiving 1 of 7 regimens...
December 2016: Current Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976832/clinical-characteristics-of-doxorubicin-associated-alopecia-in-28-dogs
#16
Elizabeth F Falk, Andrea T H Lam, Lisa G Barber, Lluis Ferrer
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is common in humans, but there are limited reports describing the clinical features of CIA in dogs. OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of doxorubicin-associated alopecia (DAA) in canine patients at a teaching hospital from 2012 to 2014. ANIMALS: Signalment, diagnosis, treatment protocols and clinical examination findings were recorded in 150 dogs treated with doxorubicin from 2012 to 2014...
April 2017: Veterinary Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852186/supportive-care-of-women-with-breast-cancer-key-concerns-and-practical-solutions
#17
REVIEW
Nicholas Zdenkowski, Stephanie Tesson, Janine Lombard, Melanie Lovell, Sandra Hayes, Prudence A Francis, Haryana M Dhillon, Frances M Boyle
Patients diagnosed with breast cancer may have supportive care needs for many years after diagnosis. High quality multidisciplinary care can help address these needs and reduce the physical and psychological effects of breast cancer and its treatment. Ovarian suppression and extended endocrine therapy benefits are associated with vasomotor, musculoskeletal, sexual and bone density-related side effects. Aromatase inhibitor musculoskeletal syndrome is a common reason for treatment discontinuation. Treatment strategies include education, exercise, simple analgesia and a change to tamoxifen or another aromatase inhibitor...
November 21, 2016: Medical Journal of Australia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27689316/results-of-scalp-cooling-during-anthracycline-containing-chemotherapy-depend-on-scalp-skin-temperature
#18
M M C Komen, C H Smorenburg, J W R Nortier, T van der Ploeg, C J G van den Hurk, J J M van der Hoeven
OBJECTIVES: The success of scalp cooling in preventing or reducing chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) is highly variable between patients undergoing similar chemotherapy regimens. A decrease of the scalp skin temperature seems to be an important factor, but data on the optimum temperature reached by scalp cooling to prevent CIA are lacking. This study investigated the relation between scalp skin temperature and its efficacy to prevent CIA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this explorative study, scalp skin temperature was measured during scalp cooling in 62 breast cancer patients undergoing up to six cycles of anthracycline containing chemotherapy...
December 2016: Breast: Official Journal of the European Society of Mastology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27522546/preventive-effects-of-cedrol-against-alopecia-in-cyclophosphamide-treated-mice
#19
Shan-Shan Chen, Yan Zhang, Qiu-Li Lu, Zhe Lin, Yuqing Zhao
Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration...
September 2016: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27221843/parental-experiences-with-chemotherapy-induced-alopecia-among-childhood-cancer-patients-in-indonesia
#20
Stefanus Gunawan, Chloe Ten Broeke, Peter van de Ven, Marijn Arnoldussen, Gertjan Kaspers, Saskia Mostert
BACKGROUND: This study assessed parental experiences with chemotherapy-induced alopecia among children with cancer treated at an Indonesian academic hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty parents of childhood cancer patients were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. RESULTS: The moment that hair fell out was the moment that parents (84%) had to admit their child had cancer. Alopecia was a traumatizing painful experience (46%)...
2016: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention: APJCP
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