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ARMD adverse reaction to metal debris

Gulraj S Matharu, Andrew Judge, David W Murray, Hemant G Pandit
BACKGROUND: Metal-on-metal hip replacement (MoMHR) revision surgery for adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) has been associated with an increased risk of early complications and reoperation and inferior patient-reported outcome scores compared with non-ARMD revisions. As a result, early revision specifically for ARMD with adoption of a lower surgical threshold has been widely recommended with the goal of improving the subsequent prognosis after ARMD revisions. However, no large cohorts have compared the risk of complications and reoperation after MoMHR revision surgery for ARMD (an unanticipated revision indication) with those after non-ARMD revisions (which represent conventional modes of arthroplasty revision)...
February 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Yoshinubo Uchihara, George Grammatopoulos, Mitsuru Munemoto, Gulraj Matharu, Yusuke Inagaki, Hemant Pandit, Yasuhito Tanaka, Nick A Athanasou
Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasties (MoMHRAs) have a high failure rate due to pseudotumour formation. It is not certain whether pseudotumours in bilateral MoMHRAs form on the basis of an adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) that is entirely due to a local innate and adaptive immune response to Cobalt-Chrome (Co-Cr) wear particles. To determine if there is a systemic component to ARMD in bilateral MoMHRAs, we examined the histology of ARMD in unilateral and bilateral MoMHRAs revised for pseudotumour and determined whether implant survival differed between these two groups...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Materials Science. Materials in Medicine
Gulraj S Matharu, Antti Eskelinen, Andrew Judge, Hemant G Pandit, David W Murray
Background and purpose - The initial outcomes following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty (MoMHA) revision surgery performed for adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were poor. Furthermore, robust thresholds for performing ARMD revision are lacking. This article is the second of 2. The first article considered the various investigative modalities used during MoMHA patient surveillance (Matharu et al. 2018a ). The present article aims to provide a clinical update regarding ARMD revision surgery in MoMHA patients (hip resurfacing and large-diameter MoM total hip arthroplasty), with specific focus on the threshold for performing ARMD revision, the surgical strategy, and the outcomes following revision...
March 1, 2018: Acta Orthopaedica
Ran Tao, Fan Liu, Ya-Ke Liu, Yue Lu, Hua Xu, Yi Cao, Zhen-Yu Zhou, Wei Wang
INTRODUCTION: Both hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) and large-diameter head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (LDH MoM THA) are generally used for young and active patients. A number of comparative studies of HRA and total hip arthroplasty have been published in the literature. However, studies that have compared HRA with LDH MoM THA are rare. The purpose of this study is to compare the mid-term results of HRA with those of LDH MoM THA in young patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were enrolled in the study and randomized into two groups: HRA group (28 hips) and LDH MoM THA group (40 hips)...
February 18, 2018: International Orthopaedics
Richard de Steiger, Andrea Peng, Peter Lewis, Stephen Graves
BACKGROUND: Large-head metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing hip replacements have been shown to have a much higher rate of revision than other bearing surfaces. However, small-head (≤ 32 mm) MoM bearing surfaces have been in use for many years with several reports of satisfactory mid- to long-term survivorship. It is unclear whether the long-term survival of small-head MoM devices will continue to be satisfactory or whether the same concerns seen with the large-head MoM devices will ultimately become more prevalent...
February 8, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Erik Aro, Marko Seppänen, Keijo T Mäkelä, Pauliina Luoto, Anne Roivainen, Hannu T Aro
Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings in total hip arthroplasties and hip resurfacing arthroplasties have recently shown a new type of complication: adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). ARMD is characterized by local severe inflammation and tissue necrosis leading to implant failures. The gluteal muscle region is important for the patient outcome after revision surgery. This prospective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) study was undertaken to evaluate the characteristics of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]fluoro-d-glucose ([18 F]FDG) and [68 Ga]Gallium citrate ([68 Ga]Citrate) PET/CT in ARMD patients...
December 27, 2017: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
Lari Lehtovirta, Aleksi Reito, Jyrki Parkkinen, Harry Hothi, Johann Henckel, Alister Hart, Antti Eskelinen
BACKGROUND: Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris (ARMD) is still a major reason for revision surgeries in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. ARMD consists of a wide range of alterations in periprosthetic tissues, most important of which are metallosis, inflammation, pseudotumors and necrosis. Studies investigating histopathological findings and their association to implant wear or indirect measures of wear have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, we aimed to investigate bearing surface wear volume, whole blood and synovial fluid metal ion concentrations, histopathological findings in periprosthetic tissues and their associations...
December 11, 2017: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Donatella Granchi, Lucia Maria Savarino, Gabriela Ciapetti, Nicola Baldini
Metals and metal alloys are the most used materials in orthopedic implants. The focus is on total hip arthroplasty (THA) that, though well tolerated, may be associated with local and remote adverse effects in the medium-long term. This review aims to summarize data on the biological consequences of the metal implant degradation that have been attributed predominantly to metal-on-metal (MoM) THA. Local responses to metals consist of a broad clinical spectrum ranging from small asymptomatic tissue lesions to severe destruction of bone and soft tissues, which are designated as metallosis, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD), aseptic lymphocytic vasculitis associated lesion (ALVAL), and pseudotumors...
November 13, 2017: Critical Reviews in Toxicology
Gulraj S Matharu, Andrew Judge, Antti Eskelinen, David W Murray, Hemant G Pandit
The unexpected high revision rates of large-diameter (femoral head sizes of 36 mm or greater) metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties (MoMHAs) have led to worldwide regulatory authorities recommending regular surveillance, even for asymptomatic individuals. However, these recommendations are not evidence-based and are very costly. The rapidly evolving evidence base requires an update regarding the investigation and management of MoMHA patients. This article is the first of 2 (the second article in this series will consider the threshold for performing revision, and the outcomes following ARMD revision surgery: Matharu et al...
November 6, 2017: Acta Orthopaedica
Anthony Deny, Janie Barry, Jonathan R B Hutt, Martin Lavigne, Vincent Massé, Pascal-André Vendittoli
INTRODUCTION: Metal ion release from wear and corrosion at the femoral head-stem taper junction can evoke local adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). In a specific large-diameter head (LDH) total hip arthroplasty (THA) system, ceramic femoral heads of 44 to 48 mm are available with a titanium (Ti) adaptor sleeve, while heads of 36- to 40-mm come without sleeves. The hypothesis of this study is that the Ti adaptor sleeve with LDH ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings will not cause wear or corrosion at the taper junction and, thus, will not generate high whole blood Ti ion levels...
October 16, 2017: Hip International: the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Research on Hip Pathology and Therapy
Tobias Reiner, Thuy D Do, Matthias C Klot, Fabian Hertzsch, Kirsten Seelmann, Matthias M Gaida, Marc-André Weber, Tobias Gotterbarm
BACKGROUND: Concern has been raised about the late onset of adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) in patients with a small-head metal-on-metal total hip replacement. The aims of this study were to assess the frequency and characteristic appearance of ARMD in patients with a small-head (28-mm) metal-on-metal total hip replacement and elevated blood ion levels (>1 μg/L) after a minimum follow-up of 10 years and to analyze the possible risk factors associated with the prevalence of these lesions...
September 20, 2017: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
Gulraj S Matharu, Fiona Berryman, Andrew Judge, Aleksi Reito, Jamie McConnell, Olli Lainiala, Stephen Young, Antti Eskelinen, Hemant G Pandit, David W Murray
BACKGROUND: The authors of recent studies have reported newly devised implant-specific blood metal ion thresholds to predict adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) in patients who have undergone unilateral or bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty. These thresholds were most effective for identifying patients at low risk of ARMD. We investigated whether these newly devised blood metal ion thresholds could effectively identify patients at risk of ARMD after MoM hip arthroplasty in an external cohort of patients...
September 20, 2017: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
Anna Di Laura, Paul D Quinn, Vasiliki C Panagiotopoulou, Harry S Hothi, Johann Henckel, Jonathan J Powell, Fitim Berisha, Fernanda Amary, J Fred W Mosselmans, John A Skinner, Alister J Hart
The mechanisms of metal release from the articulation at the head cup bearing and the tapered junctions of orthopaedic hip implants are known to differ and the debris generated varies in size, shape and volume. Significantly less metal is lost from the taper junction between Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum (CoCrMo) and Titanium (Ti) components (fretting-corrosion dominant mechanism), when compared to the CoCrMo bearing surfaces (wear-corrosion dominant mechanism). Corrosion particles from the taper junction can lead to Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris (ARMD) similar to those seen with CoCrMo bearings...
September 8, 2017: Scientific Reports
Naoki Nakano, Andrea Volpin, Jonathan Bartlett, Vikas Khanduja
Despite the initial promise of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants as the ideal bearing surface for hip replacements and resurfacings, high short term failure rates due to an adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) have led to a dramatic reduction in the number of MoM implants used in the modern era. With over one million patients worldwide having undergone hip operations utilizing a MoM bearing surface, the long term outcomes for such patients remains unknown, and there is much debate as to the most effective management of these patients...
July 2017: Indian Journal of Orthopaedics
Manish Kiran, Catherine Armstrong, Deepak Shivarathre, Viju K Peter
BACKGROUND: Blood cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ion levels have been used as surveillance tools for adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) in metal-on-metal (MoM) articulations with varying thresholds in different countries. The aim of our study is to present the serial 12-year blood Co and Cr levels in a cohort of MoM total hip arthroplasties (THAs) with femoral head size ≥36 mm and analyze their utility in asymptomatic patients at current thresholds. METHODS: A total of 256 patients with unilateral MoM THA with femoral head size ≥36 mm were included in this study with data collected prospectively...
December 2017: Journal of Arthroplasty
G S Matharu, A Judge, H G Pandit, D W Murray
AIMS: To determine the outcomes following revision surgery of metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties (MoMHA) performed for adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD), and to identify factors predictive of re-revision. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective observational study using National Joint Registry (NJR) data on 2535 MoMHAs undergoing revision surgery for ARMD between 2008 and 2014. The outcomes studied following revision were intra-operative complications, mortality and re-revision surgery...
August 2017: Bone & Joint Journal
G S Matharu, A Judge, D W Murray, H G Pandit
OBJECTIVES: Few studies have assessed outcomes following non-metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty (non-MoMHA) revision surgery performed for adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). We assessed outcomes following non-MoMHA revision surgery performed for ARMD, and identified predictors of re-revision. METHODS: We performed a retrospective observational study using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. All non-MoMHAs undergoing revision surgery for ARMD between 2008 and 2014 were included (185 hips in 185 patients)...
July 2017: Bone & Joint Research
Olivier Guyen, Christophe Tissot
The potentially severe complications related to metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have led to a dramatic decrease of their use. Large diameter heads are more likely to fail than smaller diameters, but complications have been described even with « small » diameters. Therefore, monitoring of MoM arthroplasties is mandatory. This includes physical examination, X-Rays, metal ion levels, and potentially cross-sectional imaging. Despite pathophysiology of adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) is better understood, their evolution and the potential systemic complications remain unclear...
December 14, 2016: Revue Médicale Suisse
Edward J Testa, Brian J McGrory
Adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) is a known cause of failed metal in hip arthroplasty. Diagnosis of this type of prosthesis failure may be difficult, and the hallmark is an abnormally elevated serum cobalt level. Concomitant diagnoses may also be present, such as infection, instability, and loosening, and this may confuse interpretation of abnormal laboratories. We present here, for the first time, 2 patients with ARMD and crystalline arthropathy. In each case, the patient chose surgery for ARMD, with resolution of symptoms and no recurrence of the crystalline arthropathy...
March 2017: Arthroplasty Today
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