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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29143398/a-retrospective-cohort-study-of-the-health-of-children-prenatally-exposed-to-methadone-buprenorphine-or-naltrexone-compared-with-non-exposed-control-children
#1
Erin Kelty, Gary Hulse
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the health of children exposed to opioid pharmacotherapies in utero. This study aims to examine the health of children from birth to 5 years of age, who were exposed to methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone with non-exposed children. METHODS: Children were identified by linking the treatment records of women treated with one of the three opioid pharmacotherapies with midwife notifications. Live-born children exposed to methadone (n = 198), buprenorphine (n = 122), naltrexone (n = 67) in utero, and neonates not prenatally exposed to opioids (n = 387) born between 2001 and 2011 in Western Australia were included in the study...
November 16, 2017: American Journal on Addictions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141994/type-ii-diabetes-and-incidence-of-estrogen-receptor-negative-breast-cancer-in-african-american-women
#2
Julie R Palmer, Nelsy Castro-Webb, Kimberly Bertrand, Traci N Bethea, Gerald V Denis
White women with type II diabetes (T2D) have an estimated 20% increased risk of developing breast cancer. Little is known about associations by breast cancer subtype or among African American (AA) women, who are disproportionately affected by T2D and estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer. We assessed the relation of T2D to incidence of ER- and ER+ breast cancer in data from the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort of AA women enrolled in 1995 and followed biennially. During 847,934 person-years of follow-up, there were 1,851 incident invasive breast cancers, including 914 ER+ and 468 ER- cases...
November 15, 2017: Cancer Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29137950/linking-race-cancer-outcomes-and-tissue-repair
#3
REVIEW
Jung S Byun, Samson Park, Ambar Caban, Alana Jones, Kevin Gardner
The burden of cancer in the United States is unevenly spread across its different populations, with stark differences in both disease prevalence and outcome based on race and ethnicity. Although a large portion of these differences can be explained by a variety of socio-behavioral and socio-economic factors, even after these exposures are taken into consideration, significant disparities persist. In this review, we explore a conceptual framework of biological theories and unifying concepts, based on an evolutionary perspective, that may help better define common guiding principles for exploration of underlying etiologies of cancer health disparities...
November 11, 2017: American Journal of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29137949/the-science-of-cancer-health-disparities
#4
EDITORIAL
Kevin Gardner
This Guest Editorial highlights the reviews in Race in Cancer Health Disparities Theme Issue that improve our understanding of the complex role of race in disparities in cancer frequency and outcome.
November 11, 2017: American Journal of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29137948/analysis-of-tumor-biology-to-advance-cancer-health-disparity-research
#5
REVIEW
Cheryl Jacobs Smith, Tsion Zewdu Minas, Stefan Ambs
Cancer mortality rates in the US continue to decline. Reductions in tobacco use, uptake of preventive measures, adoption of early detection methods, and better treatments have resulted in improved cancer outcomes for men and women. Despite this progress, some population groups continue to experience an excessive cancer burden when compared with other population groups. One of the most prominent cancer health disparities exists in prostate cancer. Prostate cancer mortality rates are highest among men of African ancestry when compared with other men, both in the US and globally...
November 11, 2017: American Journal of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29135791/an-ecological-approach-to-understanding-preventive-service-utilization-among-the-underserved
#6
Bettie Coplan
Preventive services have the potential to reduce health disparities; however, these services are underutilized, particularly among the underserved. Patients with low socioeconomic status and racial and ethnic minorities experience significant health disparities related to cancer and infectious and chronic diseases but face multilevel challenges accessing preventive care. The purpose of this article is to enhance understanding of preventive service utilization among underserved patients by providing an ecological framework that addresses factors at multiple levels that influence patient care...
January 2018: Family & Community Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128568/race-in-cancer-health-disparities-theme-issue-colorectal-cancer-disparity-in-african-americans-risk-factors-and-carcinogenic-mechanisms
#7
REVIEW
Gaius J Augustus, Nathan A Ellis
African Americans have the highest incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) of any ethnic group in the United States. Although some of these disparities can be explained by differences in access to care, cancer screening, and other socioeconomic factors, disparities remain after adjustment for these factors. Consequently, an examination of recent advances in the understanding of ethnicity-specific factors, including genetic and environmental factors relating to risk of CRC, the biology of CRC progression, and the changes in screening and mortality, is important for evaluating our progress towards eliminating the disparities...
November 8, 2017: American Journal of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128565/obesity-and-triple-negative-breast-cancer-disparities-controversies-and-biology
#8
REVIEW
Eric C Dietze, Tanya A Chavez, Victoria L Seewaldt
Once considered a problem of Western nations, obesity (body mass index ≥30kg/m(2)) has rapidly increased since the 1970s to become a major threat to world health. Since 1970, the face of obesity has changed from a disease of affluence and abundance to a disease of poverty. Over the last 10 years, studies have mechanistically linked obesity and an obese tumor microenvironment with signaling pathways that predict aggressive breast cancer biology. For example, in the United States African-American women are more likely than non-Hispanic European-American women to be obese and to be diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)...
November 8, 2017: American Journal of Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29117362/cancer-groups-outline-research-needs-to-address-health-care-disparities
#9
Kurt Ullman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2017: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114712/the-australian-burden-of-disease-study-impact-and-causes-of-illness-and-death-in-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-2011
#10
Fadwa Al-Yaman
This study estimates fatal and nonfatal disease burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 and compares it with non-Indigenous Australians. The study found that there were 284 years lost per 1000 people because of premature death or living with ill health. Most of the disease burden was from chronic diseases (64%), particularly mental and substance-use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. The burden of disease was higher among males (54%) than females (46%) and higher for fatal (53%) than for nonfatal burden (47%)...
October 11, 2017: Public Health Research & Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29108988/urban-rural-differences-in-breast-and-cervical-cancer-incidence-the-mediating-roles-of-socioeconomic-status-and-provider-density
#11
Jennifer L Moss, Benmei Liu, Eric J Feuer
BACKGROUND: Breast and cervical cancer incidence vary by urbanicity, and several ecological factors could contribute to these patterns. In particular, cancer screening or other sociodemographic and health care system variables could explain geographic disparities in cancer incidence. METHODS: Governmental and research sources provided data on 612 counties in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for rural-urban continuum code, socioeconomic status (SES) quintile, percent non-Hispanic White residents, density of primary care physicians, cancer screening, and breast and cervical cancer incidence rates (2009-2013)...
November 3, 2017: Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29108691/spatial-variation-in-cancer-incidence-and-survival-over-time-across-queensland-australia
#12
Susanna M Cramb, Paula Moraga, Kerrie L Mengersen, Peter D Baade
Interpreting changes over time in small-area variation in cancer survival, in light of changes in cancer incidence, aids understanding progress in cancer control, yet few space-time analyses have considered both measures. Bayesian space-time hierarchical models were applied to Queensland Cancer Registry data to examine geographical changes in cancer incidence and relative survival over time for the five most common cancers (colorectal, melanoma, lung, breast, prostate) diagnosed during 1997-2004 and 2005-2012 across 516 Queensland residential small-areas...
November 2017: Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103529/influence-of-race-insurance-status-and-geographic-access-to-plastic-surgeons-on-immediate-breast-reconstruction-rates
#13
Paris D Butler, Olatomide Familusi, Joseph M Serletti, Justin P Fox
BACKGROUND: This study evaluates the rates of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) among racial and insurance status subgroups, in the setting of a changing plastic surgeon workforce. METHODS: Using state level inpatient and ambulatory surgery data, we identified discharges for adult women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. This information was supplemented with plastic surgeon workforce data and aggregated to the health service area-level (HSA). Hierarchical linear models were used to risk standardized IBR rates for 8 race-payer subgroups...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29102459/health-insurance-status-and-clinical-cancer-screenings-among-u-s-adults
#14
Guixiang Zhao, Catherine A Okoro, Jun Li, Machell Town
INTRODUCTION: Health insurance coverage is linked to clinical preventive service use. This study examined cancer screenings among U.S. adults by health insurance status. METHODS: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System collected data on healthcare access and cancer screenings from 42 states and the District of Columbia in 2014. Data analyses were conducted in 2016. Participants' health insurance status during the preceding 12 months was categorized as adequately insured, underinsured, or never insured...
November 1, 2017: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29101688/racial-disparities-and-factors-affecting-michigan-colorectal-cancer-screening
#15
Vincent Grzywacz, Nasir Hussain, Neli Ragina
INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to investigate the various factors that influence colorectal cancer screening in Michigan using 6091 participants in the Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System representing adults ≥ 50 years old. METHODS: Screening for colorectal cancer was assessed as fecal occult blood testing or colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy. Full models simultaneously adjusted for alcohol use, angina/coronary heart disease, stroke, heart attack, gender, income, marital status, race, age, diabetes, disability, exercise, health care coverage, health care access, smoking, and mental health...
November 3, 2017: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29100333/functional-consequence-of-the-p53-codon-72-polymorphism-in-colorectal-cancer
#16
Venkat R Katkoori, Upender Manne, Lakshmi S Chaturvedi, Marc D Basson, Pam Haan, Daniel Coffey, Harvey L Bumpers
Background: The codon 72 polymorphism in p53 has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, prognosis and CRC health disparities. We examined the functional consequence of this polymorphism in CRC. Experimental Design: Plasmids (pCMV6) that express different phenotypes of p53 [p53 wild type (wt) at codon 72 (R72(wt)), R72(wt) with mutation at codon 273 cysteine (R72(273Cys)), p53 mutation at codon 72 (P72(wt)) and P72(wt) with mutation at codon 273 (P72(273Cys))] were constructed...
September 29, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29099032/disparities-in-brain-cancer-in-the-united-states-a-literature-review-of-gliomas
#17
REVIEW
Dharam Persaud-Sharma, Joseph Burns, Jeran Trangle, Sabyasachi Moulik
In the human body, the central regulatory system of homeostasis is maintained by the brain. Its complexity is mesmerizing and many of its functions are largely uncharted. Unfortunately, its functionality is often impaired through neoplastic growths, like gliomas, which are devastating to patients and their families. Annually, gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours affecting over 20,000 people in the United States. However, despite their status as the third most common cause of cancer related death for individuals between ages 20 and 39, the aetiology of gliomas remains unknown...
July 25, 2017: Medical Sciences: Open Access Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29098204/sexual-orientation-gender-and-environmental-injustice-unequal-carcinogenic-air-pollution-risks-in-greater-houston
#18
Timothy W Collins, Sara E Grineski, Danielle X Morales
Disparate residential hazard exposures based on disadvantaged gender status (e.g., among female-headed households) have been documented in the distributive environmental justice literature, yet no published studies have examined whether disproportionate environmental risks exist based on minority sexual orientation. To address this gap, we use data from the US Census, American Community Survey and the Environmental Protection Agency at the 2010 census tract level to examine the spatial relationships between same-sex partner households and cumulative cancer risk from exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emitted by all ambient emission sources in Greater Houston (Texas)...
2017: Annals of the American Association of Geographers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29083467/reducing-racial-disparities-in-breast-cancer-care-the-role-of-big-data
#19
REVIEW
Katherine E Reeder-Hayes, Melissa A Troester, Anne-Marie Meyer
Advances in a wide array of scientific technologies have brought data of unprecedented volume and complexity into the oncology research space. These novel big data resources are applied across a variety of contexts-from health services research using data from insurance claims, cancer registries, and electronic health records, to deeper and broader genomic characterizations of disease. Several forms of big data show promise for improving our understanding of racial disparities in breast cancer, and for powering more intelligent and far-reaching interventions to close the racial gap in breast cancer survival...
October 15, 2017: Oncology (Williston Park, NY)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29083094/lower-trial-participation-by-culturally-and-linguistically-diverse-cald-cancer-patients-is-largely-due-to-language-barriers
#20
Allan 'Ben' Smith, Meera Agar, Geoff Delaney, Joseph Descallar, Kelsey Dobell-Brown, Melissa Grand, Jennifer Aung, Pinky Patel, Nasreen Kaadan, Afaf Girgis
AIM: Clinical trials play a critical role in advancing cancer care, but international research shows that few cancer patients, particularly culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients, participate in trials. This limits generalizability of trial results and increases health disparities. This study aimed to establish rates and correlates of trial participation among CALD patients in South Western Sydney Local Health District (SWSLHD), a highly culturally diverse area. METHODS: Data from all cancer patients diagnosed and/or treated in SWSLHD from January 2006 to July 2016 were analyzed retrospectively...
October 30, 2017: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology
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