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wearable sensor

R Peng, Z Sonner, A Hauke, E Wilder, J Kasting, T Gaillard, D Swaille, F Sherman, X Mao, J Hagen, R Murdock, J Heikenfeld
Wearable sweat biosensensing technology has dominantly relied on techniques which place planar-sensors or fluid-capture materials directly onto the skin surface. This 'on-skin' approach can result in sample volumes in the μL regime, due to the roughness of skin and/or due to the presence of hair. Not only does this increase the required sampling time to 10's of minutes or more, but it also increases the time that sweat spends on skin and therefore increases the amount of analyte contamination coming from the skin surface...
October 18, 2016: Lab on a Chip
Nima Toosizadeh, Homayoon Harati, Tzu-Chuan Yen, Cindy Fastje, Jane Mohler, Bijan Najafi, Michael Dohm
BACKGROUND: This study examined short- and long-term improvements in motor performance, quantified using wearable sensors, in response to facet spine injection in degenerative facet osteoarthropathy patients. METHODS: Adults with confirmed degenerative facet osteoarthropathy were recruited and were treated with medial or intermediate branch block injection. Self-report pain, health condition, and disability (Oswestry), as well as objective motor performance measures (gait, balance, and timed-up-and-go) were obtained in five sessions: pre-surgery (baseline), immediately after the injection, one-month, three-month, and 12-month follow-ups...
October 11, 2016: Clinical Biomechanics
Salzitsa Anastasova, Blair Crewther, Pawel Bembnowicz, Vincenzo Curto, Henry Md Ip, Bruno Rosa, Guang-Zhong Yang
In sport, exercise and healthcare settings, there is a need for continuous, non-invasive monitoring of biomarkers to assess human performance, health and wellbeing. Here we report the development of a flexible microfluidic platform with fully integrated sensing for on-body testing of human sweat. The system can simultaneously and selectively measure metabolite (e.g. lactate) and electrolytes (e.g. pH, sodium) together with temperature sensing for internal calibration. The construction of the platform is designed such that continuous flow of sweat can pass through an array of flexible microneedle type of sensors (50µm diameter) incorporated in a microfluidic channel...
September 21, 2016: Biosensors & Bioelectronics
Anup D Patel, Robert Moss, Steven W Rust, Jeremy Patterson, Robert Strouse, Satyanarayana Gedela, Jesse Haines, Simon M Lin
INTRODUCTION: Epilepsy is a common neurological condition. Seizure diary reports and patient- or caregiver-reported seizure counts are often inaccurate and underestimated. Many caregivers express stress and anxiety about the patient with epilepsy having seizures when they are not present. Therefore, a need exists for the ability to recognize and/or detect a seizure in the home setting. However, few studies have inquired on detection device features that are important to patients and their caregivers...
October 11, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Andreas K Triantafyllidis, Vassilis G Koutkias, Ioanna Chouvarda, Ilia Adami, Angelina Kouroubali, Nicos Maglaveras
Sensor-based health systems can often become difficult to use, extend and sustain. The authors propose a framework for designing sensor-based health monitoring systems aiming to provide extensible and usable monitoring services in the scope of pervasive patient care. The authors' approach relies on a distributed system for monitoring the patient health status anytime-anywhere and detecting potential health complications, for which healthcare professionals and patients are notified accordingly. Portable or wearable sensing devices measure the patient's physiological parameters, a smart mobile device collects and analyses the sensor data, a Medical Center system receives notifications on the detected health condition, and a Health Professional Platform is used by formal caregivers in order to review the patient condition and configure monitoring schemas...
September 2016: Healthcare Technology Letters
Mohammed H Iqbal, Abdullatif Aydin, Oliver Brunckhorst, Prokar Dasgupta, Kamran Ahmed
With rapid advances in technology, wearable devices have evolved and been adopted for various uses, ranging from simple devices used in aiding fitness to more complex devices used in assisting surgery. Wearable technology is broadly divided into head-mounted displays and body sensors. A broad search of the current literature revealed a total of 13 different body sensors and 11 head-mounted display devices. The latter have been reported for use in surgery (n = 7), imaging (n = 3), simulation and education (n = 2) and as navigation tools (n = 1)...
October 2016: Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Hyeon Jun Sim, Changsoon Choi, Shi Hyeong Kim, Kang Min Kim, Chang Jun Lee, Youn Tae Kim, Xavier Lepró, Ray H Baughman, Seon Jeong Kim
Stretchable fiber and yarn triboelectric nanogenerator are sought for such applications as wearable sensing system such as cloth communication devices, electronic textiles, and robotic sensory skin. Unfortunately, previously reported triboelectric fiber and yarn are difficult to have stretchable property. We introduce here a new type of stretchable and weavable triboelectric fibers with microdiameter dimensions. The stretchable triboelectric fibers can be reversibly stretched up to 50% in tensile direction while generating voltage output proportional to the applied tensile strain...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Christina Orphanidou, Ivana Drobnjak
Data in recordings obtained from ambulatory patients using wearable sensors are often corrupted by motion artefact and are, in general noisier, than data obtained from non-mobile patients. Identifying and ignoring erroneous measurements from these data is very important, if wearable sensors are to be incorporated into clinical practice. In this paper we propose a novel Signal Quality Index (SQI), intended to assess whether reliable heart rates (HR) can be obtained from a single channel of ECG collected from ambulatory patients, using wearable sensors...
October 5, 2016: IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
Naveen N Jason, Stephen J Wang, Sushrut Bhanushali, Wenlong Cheng
This work demonstrates a facile "paint-on" approach to fabricate highly stretchable and highly sensitive strain sensors by combining one-dimensional copper nanowire networks with two-dimensional graphite microflakes. This paint-on approach allows for the fabrication of electronic skin (e-skin) patches which can directly replicate with high fidelity the human skin surface they are on, regardless of the topological complexity. This leads to high accuracy for detecting biometric signals for applications in personalised wearable sensors...
September 22, 2016: Nanoscale
Jonathan D Pegan, Jasmine Zhang, Michael Chu, Thao Nguyen, Sun-Jun Park, Akshay Paul, Joshua Kim, Mark Bachman, Michelle Khine
This work presents a wrinkled Platinum (wPt) strain sensor with tunable strain sensitivity for applications in wearable health monitoring. These stretchable sensors show a dynamic range of up to 185% strain and gauge factor (GF) of 42. This is believed to be the highest reported GF of any metal thin film strain sensor over a physiologically relevant dynamic range to date. Importantly, sensitivity and dynamic range are tunable to the application by adjusting wPt film thickness. Performance is reliable over 1000 cycles with low hysteresis after sensor conditioning...
October 6, 2016: Nanoscale
Brooklynn M Knowles, Henry Yu, Christopher R Dennison
Wearable kinematic sensors can be used to study head injury biomechanics based on kinematics and, more recently, based on tissue strain metrics using kinematics-driven brain models. These sensors require in-situ calibration and there is currently no data conveying wearable ability to estimate tissue strain. We simulated head impact (n=871) to a 50(th) percentile Hybrid III (H-III) head wearing a hockey helmet instrumented with wearable GForceTracker (GFT) sensors measuring linear acceleration and angular velocity...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Seokwoo Son, Jong Eun Park, Joohyung Lee, Minyang Yang, Bongchul Kang
Single-layer flexible touch sensor that is designed for the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free, bendable, durable, multi-sensible, and single layer transparent touch sensor was developed via a low-cost and one-step laser-induced fabrication technology. To this end, an entirely novel approach involving material, device structure, and even fabrication method was adopted. Conventional metal oxides based multilayer touch structure was substituted by the single layer structure composed of integrated silver wire networks of sensors and bezel interconnections...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
Michiko Nishiyama, Masako Sonobe, Kazuhiro Watanabe
In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing...
September 1, 2016: Biomedical Optics Express
Jorge Rodríguez, Ari Y Barrera-Animas, Luis A Trejo, Miguel Angel Medina-Pérez, Raúl Monroy
This study introduces the One-Class K-means with Randomly-projected features Algorithm (OCKRA). OCKRA is an ensemble of one-class classifiers built over multiple projections of a dataset according to random feature subsets. Algorithms found in the literature spread over a wide range of applications where ensembles of one-class classifiers have been satisfactorily applied; however, none is oriented to the area under our study: personal risk detection. OCKRA has been designed with the aim of improving the detection performance in the problem posed by the Personal RIsk DEtection(PRIDE) dataset...
2016: Sensors
Spiros C Denaxas, Folkert W Asselbergs, Jason H Moore
Modern cohort studies include self-reported measures on disease, behavior and lifestyle, sensor-based observations from mobile phones and wearables, and rich -omics data. Follow-up is often achieved through electronic health record (EHR) linkages across primary and secondary healthcare providers. Historically however, researchers typically only get to see the tip of the iceberg: coded administrative data relating to healthcare claims which mainly record billable diagnoses and procedures. The rich data generated during the clinical pathway remain submerged and inaccessible...
2016: BioData Mining
Yu Pang, He Tian, Luqi Tao, Yuxing Li, Xuefeng Wang, Ningqin Deng, Yi Yang, Tian-Ling Ren
A mechanical sensor with graphene porous network (GPN) combined with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is demonstrated by the first time. Using the nickel foam as template and chemically etching method, the GPN can be created in the PDMS-nickel foam coated with graphene, which can achieve both pressure and strain sensing properties. Because of the pores in the GPN, the composite as pressure and strain sensor exhibit wide pressure sensing range and highest sensitivity among the graphene foam-based sensors, respectively...
October 3, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
David Looney, Valentin Goverdovsky, Ivana Rosenzweig, Mary J Morrell, Danilo P Mandic
RATIONALE: To date the only quantifiable measure of neural changes that define sleep is electroencephalography (EEG). Although widely used for clinical testing, scalp-electrode EEG is costly and poorly tolerated by sleeping patients. OBJECTIVES: This is a pilot study to assess the agreement between EEG recordings obtained from a new ear-EEG sensor and those obtained simultaneously from standard scalp electrodes. METHODS: Participants were 4 healthy men, ages 25 to 36 years...
September 29, 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Erin E Brannon, Christopher C Cushing, Christopher J Crick, Tarrah B Mitchell
Intervention development can be accelerated by using wearable sensors and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to study how behaviors change within a person. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a novel, intensive EMA method for assessing physiology, behavior, and psychosocial variables utilizing two objective sensors and a mobile application (app). Adolescents (n = 20) enrolled in a 20-day EMA protocol. Participants wore a physiological monitor and an accelerometer that measured sleep and physical activity and completed four surveys per day on an app...
September 27, 2016: Translational Behavioral Medicine
Dongmin Seo, Sung-Ho Paek, Sangwoo Oh, Sungkyu Seo, Se-Hwan Paek
The incidence of diabetes is continually increasing, and by 2030, it is expected to have increased by 69% and 20% in underdeveloped and developed countries, respectively. Therefore, glucose sensors are likely to remain in high demand in medical device markets. For the current study, we developed a needle-type bio-layer interference (BLI) sensor that can continuously monitor glucose levels. Using dialysis procedures, we were able to obtain hypoglycemic samples from commercial human serum. These dialysis-derived samples, alongside samples of normal human serum were used to evaluate the utility of the sensor for the detection of the clinical interest range of glucose concentrations (70-200 mg/dL), revealing high system performance for a wide glycemic state range (45-500 mg/dL)...
2016: Sensors
Isabel G Trindade, José Machado da Silva, Rui Miguel, Madalena Pereira, José Lucas, Luís Oliveira, Bruno Valentim, Jorge Barreto, Manuel Santos Silva
This article addresses the design, development, and evaluation of T-shirt prototypes that embed novel textile sensors for the capture of cardio and respiratory signals. The sensors are connected through textile interconnects to either an embedded custom-designed data acquisition and transmission unit or to snap fastener terminals for connection to external monitoring devices. The performance of the T-shirt prototype is evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio amplitude and signal interference caused by baseline wander and motion artefacts, through laboratory tests with subjects in standing and walking conditions...
2016: Sensors
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