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RSI Intubation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30059373/maximizing-success-with-rapid-sequence-intubations
#1
Tony L Smith, Jessica Van Meter
Within emergency care settings, rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is frequently used to secure a definitive airway (i.e., endotracheal tube) to provide optimal oxygenation and ventilation in critically ill patients of all ages. For providers in these settings, a deeper understanding of the indications, associated medications, and adjunctive techniques may maximize success with this common procedure. Identification of difficult airways, using mnemonics and standardized criteria prior to the procedure allows, the clinician additional time for assimilation of additional resources and tools to increase the likelihood of first-pass success with intubation...
July 2018: Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30056844/development-and-testing-of-a-novel-anaesthesia-induction-ventilation-protocol-for-patients-with-cardiogenic-shock-complicating-acute-myocardial-infarction
#2
Athanasios Chalkias, Fotios Pavlopoulos, Effie Papageorgiou, Christos Tountas, Artemis Anania, Maria Panteli, Apostolos Beloukas, Theodoros Xanthos
BACKGROUND: Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition and patients might require rapid sequence induction (RSI) and mechanical ventilation. In this study, we evaluated a new RSI/mechanical ventilation protocol in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock. METHODS: We included consecutive adult patients who were transferred to the emergency department. The RSI protocol included 5 phases: preoxygenation, pretreatment, induction/paralysis, intubation, and mechanical ventilation (PPIIM)...
August 2018: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30033136/a-novel-technique-to-intubate-patients-without-reliable-pulse-oximetry
#3
Tony Zitek, Ross P Berkeley, Ryan Hodnick, Ken Davis, Noam Dadon, David E Slattery
Although advances have been made in the approach to airway management, intubating critically ill patients in the Emergency Department (ED) can still be perilous. In some cases, poor peripheral perfusion may preclude obtaining a consistent or reliable pulse oximetry waveform, and the intubator will not accurately know when the patient begins to desaturate. We describe a case of a patient requiring intubation in whom we were unable to obtain a consistent pulse oximetry waveform. We utilized a novel technique in which a Biphasic Cuirass Ventilation (BCV) device was applied to maintain oxygenation and ventilation during the performance of rapid sequence intubation (RSI)...
July 18, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29983393/defining-the-plateau-point-when-are-further-attempts-futile-in-out-of-hospital-advanced-airway-management
#4
Jeffrey L Jarvis, Dustin Barton, Henry Wang
BACKGROUND: We sought to characterize the number of attempts required to achieve advanced airway management (AAM) success. METHODS: Using 4 years of data from a national EMS electronic health record system, we examined the following subsets of attempted AAM: 1) cardiac arrest intubation (CA-ETI), 2) non-arrest medical intubation (MED-ETI), 3) non-arrest trauma intubation (TRA-ETI), 4) rapid-sequence intubation (RSI), 5) sedation-assisted ETI (SAI), and 6) supraglottic airway (SGA)...
July 3, 2018: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29959498/-rapid-sequence-induction-and-intubation-in-patients-with-risk-of-aspiration-recommendations-for-action-for-practical-management-of-anesthesia
#5
C Eichelsbacher, H Ilper, R Noppens, J Hinkelbein, T Loop
BACKGROUND: Induction of general anesthesia in patients with risk for aspiration needs special considerations to avoid the incidence and severity of complications. Since no evidence-based guidelines support the challenge for anesthesiologists various practical recommendations exist in clinical practice for rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSI). The aim of this systematic review is, to summarize the evidence and recommend a decision making process. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Multilevel RAND-delphi-method (RAND: Research and Development) combined with systematic literature research, individual assessment and evaluation, consensus conferences and final common sequence...
June 29, 2018: Der Anaesthesist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29944524/ketamine-as-a-rapid-sequence-induction-agent-in-the-trauma-population-a-systematic-review
#6
Josefine S Baekgaard, Trine G Eskesen, Martin Sillesen, Lars S Rasmussen, Jacob Steinmetz
The choice of drug used to facilitate endotracheal intubation in trauma patients during rapid sequence induction (RSI) may have an impact on survival. Ketamine is commonly used in the hemodynamically unstable trauma patient although it has been associated with side effects. This review sought to investigate whether ketamine should be preferred over other induction agents for RSI in trauma patients. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched on September 19, 2016 for studies reporting RSI of adult trauma patients with ketamine compared with another induction agent (etomidate, propofol, thiopental, or midazolam)...
June 25, 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29937637/integration-of-point-of-care-ultrasound-during-rapid-sequence-intubation-in-trauma-resuscitation
#7
Prakash Ranjan Mishra, Sanjeev Bhoi, Tej Prakash Sinha
Introduction: Airway and breathing management play critical role in trauma resuscitation. Early identification of esophageal intubation and detection of fatal events is critical. Authors studied the utility of integration of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) during different phases of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) in trauma resuscitation. Methods: It was prospective, randomized single-centered study conducted at the Emergency Department of a level one trauma center...
April 2018: Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29573111/a-tale-of-two-cities-prehospital-intubation-with-or-without-paralysing-agents-for-traumatic-brain-injury
#8
Cino Bendinelli, Dominic Ku, Shane Nebauer, Kate L King, Teresa Howard, Russel Gruen, Tiffany Evans, Mark Fitzgerald, Zsolt J Balogh
BACKGROUND: The role of prehospital endotracheal intubation (PETI) for traumatic brain injury is unclear. In Victoria, paramedics use rapid sequence induction (RSI) drugs to facilitate PETI, while in New South Wales (NSW) they do not have access to paralysing agents. We hypothesized that RSI would both increase PETI rates and improve mortality. METHODS: Retrospective comparison of adult primary admissions (Glasgow Coma Scale <9 and abbreviated injury scale head and neck >2) to either Victorian or NSW trauma centre, which were compared with univariate and logistic regression analysis to estimate odds ratio for mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay...
May 2018: ANZ Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29560073/nasal-cannula-apneic-oxygenation-prevents-desaturation-during-endotracheal-intubation-an-integrative-literature-review
#9
REVIEW
Joshua M Gleason, Bill R Christian, Erik D Barton
Patients requiring emergency airway management may be at greater risk of acute hypoxemic events because of underlying lung pathology, high metabolic demands, insufficient respiratory drive, obesity, or the inability to protect their airway against aspiration. Emergency tracheal intubation is often required before complete information needed to assess the risk of procedural hypoxia is acquired (i.e., arterial blood gas level, hemoglobin value, or chest radiograph). During pre-oxygenation, administering high-flow nasal oxygen in addition to a non-rebreather face mask can significantly boost the effective inspired oxygen...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29508014/-certain-and-controversial-components-of-rapid-sequence-induction
#10
T Mencke, A Zitzmann, D A Reuter
Rapid sequence induction (RSI) is a specific technique for anesthesia induction, which is performed in patients with an increased risk for pulmonary aspiration (e.g. intestinal obstruction, severe injuries and cesarean section). The incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is very low but 10-30% of anesthesia-related deaths are caused by the consequences of ARDS. The classical RSI with its main components (i.e. head-up position, avoidance of positive pressure ventilation and administration of succinylcholine) was published nearly 50 years ago and has remained almost unchanged...
April 2018: Der Anaesthesist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29465279/a-continuous-quality-improvement-airway-program-results-in-sustained-increases-in-intubation-success
#11
David J Olvera, David F E Stuhlmiller, Allen Wolfe, Charles F Swearingen, Troy Pennington, Daniel P Davis
INTRODUCTION: Airway management is a critical skill for air medical providers, including the use of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) medications. Mediocre success rates and a high incidence of complications has challenged air medical providers to improve training and performance improvement efforts to improve clinical performance. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this research was to describe the experience with a novel, integrated advanced airway management program across a large air medical company and explore the impact of the program on improvement in RSI success...
February 21, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452732/efficacy-of-pre-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-in-paediatric-traumatic-brain-injury-a-9-year-observational-study
#12
Stefan Heschl, Ben Meadley, Emily Andrew, Warwick Butt, Stephen Bernard, Karen Smith
INTRODUCTION: Prehospital airway management of the paediatric patient with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is controversial. Endotracheal intubation of children in the field requires specific skills and has potential benefits but also carries potentially serious complications. We aimed to compare mortality and functional outcomes after six months between children with TBI who either underwent prehospital rapid sequence intubation (RSI) by trained Intensive Care paramedics (ICP) or received no intubation...
May 2018: Injury
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413725/current-practices-and-safety-of-medication-use-during-rapid-sequence-intubation
#13
Christine M Groth, Nicole M Acquisto, Tina Khadem
PURPOSE: Characterize medication practices during and immediately after rapid sequence intubation (RSI) by provider/location and evaluate adverse drug events. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study of adult and pediatric intensive care unit and emergency department patients over a 24-h period surrounding first intubation. RESULTS: A total of 404 patients from 34 geographically diverse institutions were included (mean age 58 ± 22 years, males 59%, pediatric 8%)...
June 2018: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29405803/prehospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-by-intensive-care-flight-paramedics
#14
Ashleigh Delorenzo, Toby St Clair, Emily Andrew, Stephen Bernard, Karen Smith
OBJECTIVE: Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is an advanced airway procedure for critically ill or injured patients. Paramedic-performed RSI in the prehospital setting remains controversial, as unsuccessful or poorly conducted RSI is known to result in significant complications. In Victoria, intensive care flight paramedics (ICFPs) have a broad scope of practice including RSI in both the adult and pediatric population. We sought to describe the success rates and characteristics of patients undergoing RSI by ICFPs in Victoria, Australia...
February 6, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29377753/flight-versus-ground-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-success-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#15
Pieter F Fouche, Christopher Stein, Paul Simpson, Jestin N Carlson, Kristina M Zverinova, Suhail A Doi
INTRODUCTION: Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a critical procedure performed by both air medical and ground based emergency medical services (EMS). Previous work has suggested that ETI success rates are greater for air medical providers. However, air medical providers may have greater airway experience, enhanced airway education, and access to alternative ETI options such as rapid sequence intubation (RSI). We sought to analyze the impact of the type of EMS on RSI success. METHODS: A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library was conducted and eligibility, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias were assessed independently by two reviewers...
January 29, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29359072/efficacy-and-safety-of-using-high-flow-nasal-oxygenation-in-patients-undergoing-rapid-sequence-intubation
#16
Santi Maurizio Raineri, Andrea Cortegiani, Giuseppe Accurso, Claudia Procaccianti, Filippo Vitale, Sabrina Caruso, Antonino Giarratano, Cesare Gregoretti
Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy in patients undergoing rapid sequence intubation (RSI) for emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: HFNO of 60 L.min-1 at an inspiratory oxygen fraction of 1 was delivered 4 min before laryngoscopy and maintained until the patient was intubated, and correct intubation was verified by the appearance of the end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2 ) waveform. Transcutaneous oxygenation (SpO2 ), heart rate and non-invasive mean arterial pressure were monitored at baseline (T0), after 4 min on HFNO (T1) and at the time of laryngoscopy (T2) and endotracheal intubation (ETI) (T3)...
December 2017: Turkish Journal of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29331494/a-novel-difficult-airway-prediction-tool-for-emergency-airway-management-validation-of-the-heaven-criteria-in-a-large-air-medical-cohort
#17
Edward Kuzmack, Travis Inglis, David Olvera, Allen Wolfe, Kona Seng, Daniel Davis
BACKGROUND: Difficult-airway prediction tools help identify optimal airway techniques, but were derived in elective surgery patients and may not be applicable to emergency rapid sequence intubation (RSI). The HEAVEN criteria (Hypoxemia, Extremes of size, Anatomic abnormalities, Vomit/blood/fluid, Exsanguination, Neck mobility issues) may be more relevant to emergency RSI patients. OBJECTIVE: To validate the HEAVEN criteria for difficult-airway prediction in emergency RSI using a large air medical cohort...
April 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297718/evaluation-of-physiologic-alterations-during-prehospital-paramedic-performed-rapid-sequence-intubation
#18
Robert G Walker, Lynn J White, Geneva N Whitmore, Alexander Esibov, Michael K Levy, Gregory C Cover, Joel D Edminster, James M Nania
OBJECTIVE: Physiologic alterations during rapid sequence intubation (RSI) have been studied in several emergency airway management settings, but few data exist to describe physiologic alterations during prehospital RSI performed by ground-based paramedics. To address this evidence gap and provide guidance for future quality improvement initiatives in our EMS system, we collected electronic monitoring data to evaluate peri-intubation vital signs changes occurring during prehospital RSI...
May 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284835/to-evaluate-the-efficacy-of-intravenous-infusion-of-dexmedetomidine-as-premedication-in-attenuating-the-rise-of-intraocular-pressure-caused-by-succinylcholine-in-patients-undergoing-rapid-sequence-induction-for-general-anesthesia-a-randomized-study
#19
Raj Bahadur Singh, Sanjay Choubey, Saurabh Mishra
Context: Laryngoscopy and intubation performed during RSI lead to choroidal blood volume increase and an eventual rise in intraocular pressure (IOP). Use of succinylcholine (SCh) causes an undesirable rise in IOP which is further aggravated by laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective centrally acting α2 adrenergic agonist that has IOP lowering properties. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) infusion of dexmedetomidine (0...
October 2017: Anesthesia, Essays and Researches
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276277/impact-of-developing-adult-ketamine-order-panels-for-the-emergency-department
#20
Haley Baird, Rachel Rumbarger
Background: Ketamine in adults has been identified as a safe and effective alternative for multiple indications, each with specific evidence-based dosing ranges. Emergency department (ED) providers are tasked with appropriate ordering of ketamine. A multi-institutional retrospective analysis within EDs at a large health system from November 2013 to October 2015 reviewed ED adult ketamine prescribing patterns for procedural sedation (PS), rapid sequence intubation (RSI), and analgesia. Retrospective cohort results revealed 56% (84 of 150) of PS, 64% (16 of 25) of RSI, and 81...
July 2017: Hospital Pharmacy
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