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First episode psychosis

M Pruessner, L Bechard-Evans, S Pira, R Joober, D L Collins, J C Pruessner, A K Malla
BACKGROUND: Altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and reduced hippocampal volume (HV) are established correlates of stress vulnerability. We have previously shown an attenuated cortisol awakening response (CAR) and associations with HV specifically in male first-episode psychosis patients. Findings in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis regarding these neurobiological markers are inconsistent, and assessment of their interplay, accounting for sex differences, could explain incongruent results...
October 24, 2016: Psychological Medicine
Sanni Talonen, Juha Väänänen, Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
BACKGROUND: Mental health profiles differ between boys and girls from puberty onwards. It is not known whether differences also extend to symptom presentation in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. It may be that girls and boys are not treated entirely equally by the professionals. AIMS: To study gender differences in symptom profiles, family adversities, pathway to care, and characteristics of inpatient treatment at the first episode of diagnosed schizophrenia spectrum disorder (F20-29) among adolescents aged 13-17...
October 24, 2016: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
James B Kirkbride, Yasir Hameed, Gayatri Ankireddypalli, Konstantinos Ioannidis, Carolyn M Crane, Mukhtar Nasir, Nikolett Kabacs, Antonio Metastasio, Oliver Jenkins, Ashkan Espandian, Styliani Spyridi, Danica Ralevic, Suneetha Siddabattuni, Ben Walden, Adewale Adeoye, Jesus Perez, Peter B Jones
OBJECTIVE: Few studies have characterized the epidemiology of first-episode psychoses in rural or urban settings since the introduction of early intervention psychosis services. To address this, the authors conducted a naturalistic cohort study in England, where such services are well established. METHOD: All new first-episode psychosis cases, 16-35 years old, presenting to early intervention psychosis services in the East of England were identified during 2 million person-years follow-up...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Kristin M Healey, Cali F Bartholomeusz, David L Penn
OBJECTIVE: Individuals with chronic schizophrenia (SCZ) consistently show impairments in social cognition (SC) that are associated with functional decline, and work suggests that similar associations exist in first-episode psychosis (FEP). The goal of the current article is to review and synthesize the current body of work examining SC in FEP. Secondary aims are to examine the relationship between SC and symptoms, and change in SC over time in FEP. DESIGN: Literature is reviewed from four key SC domains: emotion processing (EP), theory of mind (ToM), social perception (SP), and attributional style (AS)...
October 11, 2016: Clinical Psychology Review
Sonia Johnson, Luke Sheridan Rains, Steven Marwaha, John Strang, Thomas Craig, Tim Weaver, Paul McCrone, Michael King, David Fowler, Stephen Pilling, Louise Marston, Rumana Z Omar, Meghan Craig, Mark Hinton
BACKGROUND: Around 35-45 % of people in contact with services for a first episode of psychosis are using cannabis. Cannabis use is associated with delays in remission, poorer clinical outcomes, significant increases in the risk of relapse, and lower engagement in work or education. While there is a clear need for effective interventions, so far only very limited benefits have been achieved from psychological interventions. Contingency management (CM) is a behavioural intervention in which specified desired behavioural change is reinforced through financial rewards...
October 22, 2016: Trials
J-M Azorin, M Adida, R Belzeaux, E Fakra
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: L'Encéphale
Evangelos Vassos, Marta Di Forti, Jonathan Coleman, Conrad Iyegbe, Diana Prata, Jack Euesden, Paul O'Reilly, Charles Curtis, Anna Kolliakou, Hamel Patel, Stephen Newhouse, Matthew Traylor, Olesya Ajnakina, Valeria Mondelli, Tiago Reis Marques, Poonam Gardner-Sood, Katherine J Aitchison, John Powell, Zerrin Atakan, Kathryn E Greenwood, Shubulade Smith, Khalida Ismail, Carmine Pariante, Fiona Gaughran, Paola Dazzan, Hugh S Markus, Anthony S David, Cathryn M Lewis, Robin M Murray, Gerome Breen
BACKGROUND: Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) have successfully summarized genome-wide effects of genetic variants in schizophrenia with significant predictive power. In a clinical sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients, we estimated the ability of PRSs to discriminate case-control status and to predict the development of schizophrenia as opposed to other psychoses. METHODS: The sample (445 case and 265 control subjects) was genotyped on the Illumina HumanCore Exome BeadChip with an additional 828 control subjects of African ancestry genotyped on the Illumina Multi-Ethnic Genotyping Array...
August 6, 2016: Biological Psychiatry
Petros Petrikis, Vassiliki A Boumba, Alexandros T Tzallas, Paraskevi V Voulgari, Dimitra T Archimandriti, Petros Skapinakis, Venetsanos Mavreas
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) plays an important role in neurogenesis and synaptogenesis and may be implicated in schizophrenia, although data so far have been inconclusive. The aim of our study was to compare levels of IGF-1 in drug-naïve patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and related disorders with matched healthy controls. Forty drug naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and related disorders and forty healthy subjects matched for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and smoking status were enrolled in the study...
September 28, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Kamyar Keramatian, Taj Dhanoa, Alexander McGirr, Donna J Lang, William G Honer, Raymond W Lam, Lakshmi N Yatham
OBJECTIVES: The neurobiological underpinnings of bipolar I disorder are not yet understood. Previous structural neuroimaging studies of bipolar disorder have produced rather conflicting results. We hypothesize that clinical sub-phenotypes of bipolar I disorder defined by their psychotic symptoms, especially those with mood-incongruent psychotic features, may have more extensive structural brain abnormalities. METHODS: We investigated structural brain alterations in patients with first-episode mania (n = 55) with mood-congruent (n = 16) and mood-incongruent (n = 32) psychotic features, as well as those without psychotic symptoms (n = 7), relative to healthy subjects (n = 56)...
October 20, 2016: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry
Jone Bjornestad, Inge Joa, Tor K Larsen, Johannes Langeveld, Larry Davidson, Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad, Liss G Anda, Marius Veseth, Ingrid Melle, Jan O Johannessen, Kolbjorn Bronnick
Background: Predictors of long-term symptomatic remission are crucial to the successful tailoring of treatment in first episode psychosis. There is lack of studies distinguishing the predictive effects of different social factors. This prevents a valid evaluating of their independent effects. Objectives: To test specific social baseline predictors of long-term remission. We hypothesized that first, satisfaction with social relations predicts remission; second, that frequency of social interaction predicts remission; and third, that the effect of friend relationship satisfaction and frequency will be greater than that of family relations satisfaction and frequency...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Julia M Lappin, Margaret Heslin, Peter B Jones, Gillian A Doody, Ulrich A Reininghaus, Arsime Demjaha, Timothy Croudace, Thomas Jamieson-Craig, Kim Donoghue, Ben Lomas, Paul Fearon, Robin M Murray, Paola Dazzan, Craig Morgan
OBJECTIVE: To compare baseline demographics and 10-year outcomes of a first-episode psychosis patient incidence cohort in order to establish whether current youth-focussed age-based criteria for early intervention services are justified by patient needs. The patients in this cohort were treated prior to the establishment of early intervention services. The study aimed to test the hypothesis that those who develop psychosis at a younger age have worse outcomes than those who develop psychosis at an older age...
October 18, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Kim T Mueser, Min Kim, Jean Addington, Susan R McGurk, Sarah I Pratt, Donald E Addington
The Quality of Life Scale (QLS) is a frequently used semistructured interview for the assessment of functional outcomes in schizophrenia. Despite the use of the QLS for over 30years, the original 4-factor structure of the instrument (Interpersonal Relations, Instrumental Role, Intrapsychic Foundations, and Common Objects and Activities) has not been rigorously examined. Exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were used to evaluate the factor structure of the QLS in two independent datasets, including a mixed diagnostic sample of multi-episode participants (N=247), and a sample of individuals with a first episode of psychosis (N=337)...
October 15, 2016: Schizophrenia Research
Joachim Cordes, Andreas Bechdolf, Christina Engelke, Kai G Kahl, Chakrapani Balijepalli, Christian Lösch, Joachim Klosterkötter, Michael Wagner, Wolfgang Maier, Andreas Heinz, Walter de Millas, Wolfgang Gaebel, Georg Winterer, Birgit Janssen, Christian Schmidt-Kraepelin, Frank Schneider, Martin Lambert, Georg Juckel, Thomas Wobrock, Michael Riedel, Susanne Moebus
Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is one of the most common factors underlying the high rate of mortality observed in patients with schizophrenia. Recent research on this topic revealed that many of the patients studied were, in fact, in a medicated state. As such, it is unclear whether MetS is causally associated with the disorder itself or the medication used to treat it. In this study, patients with a clinically high risk of expressing first episode psychosis (CHR) were examined regarding the prevalence of MetS...
October 14, 2016: Schizophrenia Research
Ola Söderström, Lilith Abrahamyan Empson, Zoé Codeluppi, Dag Söderström, Philipp S Baumann, Philippe Conus
Primarily on the basis of epidemiological studies, recent research in psychiatry has established a robust link between urban living and psychosis. This paper argues first, that an experienced-based approach, moving beyond epidemiology, is needed in order to enable more fine-grained understandings of the city/psychosis nexus. The second part of the paper presents preliminary fieldwork results based on video-elicitation sessions with first-episode patients with psychotic disorders. These results lead to the generation of a series of hypotheses for further research on the role of density, sensory overload and social interaction as factors in the onset of non-affective psychoses...
October 14, 2016: Health & Place
Huai-Hsuan Tseng, Jonathan P Roiser, Gemma Modinos, Irina Falkenberg, Carly Samson, Philip McGuire, Paul Allen
Emotional processing dysfunction is widely reported in patients with chronic schizophrenia and first-episode psychosis (FEP), and has been linked to functional abnormalities of corticolimbic regions. However, corticolimbic dysfunction is less studied in people at ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR), particularly during processing prosodic voices. We examined corticolimbic response during an emotion recognition task in 18 UHR participants and compared them with 18 FEP patients and 21 healthy controls (HC). Emotional recognition accuracy and corticolimbic response were measured during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using emotional dynamic facial and prosodic voice stimuli...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
Martino Belvederi Murri, Flaminia Fanelli, Uberto Pagotto, Elena Bonora, Federico Triolo, Luigi Chiri, Fabio Allegri, Marco Mezzullo, Marco Menchetti, Valeria Mondelli, Carmine Pariante, Domenico Berardi, Ilaria Tarricone
Neuroactive steroids may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders, but few studies examined this issue. We compared serum levels of cortisol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and progesterone between a representative sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. Furthermore, we analyzed the associations between neuroactive steroids levels and the severity of psychotic symptom dimensions. Male patients had lower levels of progesterone than controls (p = 0...
2016: Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Liina Haring, René Mõttus, Kärolin Kajalaid, Kadri Koch, Kärt Uppin, Eduard Maron, Eero Vasar
Our aim with the present study was to evaluate rank-order and mean-level cognitive functioning stability among first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients, measured using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), over a six month period. We also aimed to examine longitudinal measurement invariance and identify factors-such as age, gender, educational level, treatment and psychopathological change scores-potentially linked to cognitive change among patients. In addition, correlations between objectively measured and subjectively evaluated cognitive functioning were estimated...
October 13, 2016: Schizophrenia Research
Toby T Winton-Brown, Thomas Elanjithara, Paddy Power, Ricardo Coentre, Pablo Blanco-Polaina, Philip McGuire
BACKGROUND: A key problem in the management of first episode psychosis is that patients are often reluctant to take antipsychotic medication, especially once their presenting symptoms have resolved. Clinicians may be tempted to trial a 'break in treatment' in such patients. AIM: To assess the impact of interruptions in the antipsychotic treatment of first episode psychosis. METHOD: Treatment adherence and clinical course were assessed during the 18months following presentation in 136 consecutive patients with a first episode of psychosis in 2003-2005 by a systematic retrospective casenote review...
October 10, 2016: Schizophrenia Research
Ian Brockington
In addition to bipolar cycloid episodes, infective delirium and eclamptic psychosis, each of which has characteristic clinical features and course, brief episodes of delirium and stupor are also seen in the immediate aftermath of parturition. Several mothers have had similar episodes developing later in the first 10 days, and some have cyclical disorders with an unusual time base. Bipolar/cycloid disorders can start on day 1 or even earlier.
October 16, 2016: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Lauren M Hickling, Victor Ortiz-García de la Foz, Rosa Ayesa-Arriola, Benedicto Crespo-Facorro, Philip McGuire, Rocio Perez-Iglesias
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Research suggests that tobacco smokers may develop psychosis at an earlier age than non-smokers, with effects on psychotic symptoms. We aimed to test the difference in age of onset of psychosis between smokers and non-smokers . Design Self-report data was collected from smokers and non-smokers in a population of first episode psychosis patients. SETTING: Outpatient first episode psychosis programme in Santander (Cantabria), Spain. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred and ninety seven patients (226 male, 171 female) who agreed to take part between 2001 and 2011...
October 14, 2016: Addiction
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