Read by QxMD icon Read


Sergio Eduardo Alonso Araujo, Lucas de Araujo Horcel, Victor Edmond Seid, Alexandre Bruno Bertoncini, Sidney Klajner
Background: Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is associated with less postoperative pain and faster recovery. However, it may be associated with a greater risk of symptomatic recurrence. We hypothesized that undertaking a limited surgical excision of hemorrhoid disease after stapling may be a valid approach for selected patients. Aim: To compare long-term results after stapled hemorrhoidopexy with and without complementation with closed excisional technique. Method: In a retrospective uni-institutional cohort study, sixty-five (29 men) patients underwent stapled hemorrhoidopexy and 21 (13 men) underwent stapled hemorrhoidopexy with excision...
July 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva: ABCD, Brazilian Archives of Digestive Surgery
Harland Prechel, Lu Zheng
The 2008 financial crisis was a systemic problem with deep-rooted structural causes that created opportunities to engage in financial malfeasance, a form of corporate wrongdoing. However, few quantitative studies exist on the effects of organizational and political-legal arrangements on financial malfeasance. In this paper, we examine the effects of organizational and political-legal arrangements that emerged in the 1990s in the FIRE sector (i.e., financial, insurance, and real estate) on financial malfeasance...
October 18, 2016: British Journal of Sociology
Michael D Caggiano, Wade T Tinkham, Chad Hoffman, Antony S Cheng, Todd J Hawbaker
The wildland-urban interface (WUI), the area where human development encroaches on undeveloped land, is expanding throughout the western United States resulting in increased wildfire risk to homes and communities. Although census based mapping efforts have provided insights into the pattern of development and expansion of the WUI at regional and national scales, these approaches do not provide sufficient detail for fine-scale fire and emergency management planning, which requires maps of individual building locations...
October 2016: Heliyon
Clayton P Mosher, Prisca E Zimmerman, Andrew J Fuglevand, Katalin M Gothard
The majority of neurophysiological studies that have explored the role of the primate amygdala in the evaluation of social signals have relied on visual stimuli such as images of facial expressions. Vision, however, is not the only sensory modality that carries social signals. Both humans and nonhuman primates exchange emotionally meaningful social signals through touch. Indeed, social grooming in nonhuman primates and caressing touch in humans is critical for building lasting and reassuring social bonds. To determine the role of the amygdala in processing touch, we recorded the responses of single neurons in the macaque amygdala while we applied tactile stimuli to the face...
September 2016: ENeuro
Xindi C Hu, David Q Andrews, Andrew B Lindstrom, Thomas A Bruton, Laurel A Schaider, Philippe Grandjean, Rainer Lohmann, Courtney C Carignan, Arlene Blum, Simona A Balan, Christopher P Higgins, Elsie M Sunderland
Drinking water contamination with poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) poses risks to the developmental, immune, metabolic, and endocrine health of consumers. We present a spatial analysis of 2013-2015 national drinking water PFAS concentrations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) third Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR3) program. The number of industrial sites that manufacture or use these compounds, the number of military fire training areas, and the number of wastewater treatment plants are all significant predictors of PFAS detection frequencies and concentrations in public water supplies...
October 11, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology Letters
Neil C Ford, Mark L Baccei
Spinal lamina I projection neurons serve as a major conduit by which noxious stimuli detected in the periphery are transmitted to nociceptive circuits in the brain, including the parabrachial nucleus (PB) and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). While neonatal spino-PB neurons are more than twice as likely to exhibit spontaneous activity compared to spino-PAG neurons, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear since nothing is known about the voltage-independent (i.e. 'leak') ion channels expressed by these distinct populations during early life...
October 14, 2016: Neuroscience
Theresa Scholl, Angelika Mühlebner, Gerda Ricken, Victoria Gruber, Anna Fabing, Sharon Samueli, Gudrun Gröppel, Christian Dorfer, Thomas Czech, Johannes A Hainfellner, Avanita S Prabowo, Roy J Reinten, Lisette Hoogendijk, Jasper J Anink, Eleonora Aronica, Martha Feucht
Conventional antiepileptic drugs suppress the excessive firing of neurons during seizures. In drug-resistant patients, treatment failure indicates an alternative important epileptogenic trigger. Two epilepsy-associated pathologies show myelin deficiencies in seizure-related brain regions: Focal Cortical Dysplasia IIB (FCD) and cortical tubers in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). Studies uncovering white matter-pathology mechanisms are therefore urgently needed to gain more insight into epileptogenesis, the propensity to maintain seizures, and their associated comorbidities such as cognitive defects...
October 17, 2016: Brain Pathology
Jérémie Barral, Alex D Reyes
The balance between excitation and inhibition (E-I balance) is maintained across brain regions though the network size, strength and number of synaptic connections, and connection architecture may vary substantially. We use a culture preparation to examine the homeostatic synaptic scaling rules that produce E-I balance and in vivo-like activity. We show that synaptic strength scales with the number of connections K as ∼ , close to the ideal theoretical value. Using optogenetic techniques, we delivered spatiotemporally patterned stimuli to neurons and confirmed key theoretical predictions: E-I balance is maintained, active decorrelation occurs and the spiking correlation increases with firing rate...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jianing Yu, Diego A Gutnisky, S Andrew Hires, Karel Svoboda
We rely on movement to explore the environment, for example, by palpating an object. In somatosensory cortex, activity related to movement of digits or whiskers is suppressed, which could facilitate detection of touch. Movement-related suppression is generally assumed to involve corollary discharges. Here we uncovered a thalamocortical mechanism in which cortical fast-spiking interneurons, driven by sensory input, suppress movement-related activity in layer 4 (L4) excitatory neurons. In mice locating objects with their whiskers, neurons in the ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM) fired in response to touch and whisker movement...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jun Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi Ota, Yusuke Suwa, Atsushi Ishibe, Hidenobu Masui, Kaoru Nagahori
INTRODUCTION: Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy is technically limited because of such factors as instrument crowding, in-line viewing, and insufficient countertraction. In particular, it is technically difficult to cut the distal rectum from the umbilicus using an articulating linear stapler in single-incision laparoscopic anterior resection. TECHNIQUE: After treating the mesorectum, the 5-mm trocar is replaced with a 12-mm trocar. The cartridge of the curved stapler is mounted while the shaft of the stapler is inserted into the 12-mm port extracorporeally...
November 2016: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
Simon P Fisher, Nanyi Cui, Laura E McKillop, Jessica Gemignani, David M Bannerman, Peter L Oliver, Stuart N Peirson, Vladyslav V Vyazovskiy
Prolonged wakefulness is thought to gradually increase 'sleep need' and influence subsequent sleep duration and intensity, but the role of specific waking behaviours remains unclear. Here we report the effect of voluntary wheel running during wakefulness on neuronal activity in the motor and somatosensory cortex in mice. We find that stereotypic wheel running is associated with a substantial reduction in firing rates among a large subpopulation of cortical neurons, especially at high speeds. Wheel running also has longer-term effects on spiking activity across periods of wakefulness...
October 17, 2016: Nature Communications
Tessa Verlaan, Fraukje A M Ponds, Barbara A J Bastiaansen, Albert J Bredenoord, Paul Fockens
: Background and aims: After Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM), the mucosal incision is closed with endoscopically applied clips. After each clip placement, a subsequent clipping device has to be introduced through the working channel. With the Clipmaster3, three consecutive clips can be placed without reloading which could reduce closure time. We performed a prospective study evaluating efficacy, safety, and ease of use. Closure using Clipmaster3 was compared to closure with standard clips...
October 2016: Endoscopy International Open
Kari Haikonen, Pirjo M Lillsunde
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of fire-related injury from two perspectives: post-injury social security compensations and also productivity losses due to the lost productive time from a societal perspective induced by the injury. Design and methods: A cohort of 1503 inpatients who sustained fire-related injury during the period 2001-2005 was retrospectively followed up for 5-10 years until the end of 2010, using linkages between several administrative registers. The study process was started in 2015 and finalized on March 2016...
August 19, 2016: Journal of Public Health Research
Rainer Engelken, Farzad Farkhooi, David Hansel, Carl van Vreeswijk, Fred Wolf
Neuronal activity in the central nervous system varies strongly in time and across neuronal populations. It is a longstanding proposal that such fluctuations generically arise from chaotic network dynamics. Various theoretical studies predict that the rich dynamics of rate models operating in the chaotic regime can subserve circuit computation and learning. Neurons in the brain, however, communicate via spikes and it is a theoretical challenge to obtain similar rate fluctuations in networks of spiking neuron models...
2016: F1000Research
Dennis Baldocchi, Youngryel Ryu, Trevor Keenan
A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise...
2016: F1000Research
Jonathan C W Edwards
It is widely perceived that there is a problem in giving a naturalistic account of mental representation that deals adequately with the issue of meaning, interpretation, or significance (semantic content). It is suggested here that this problem may arise partly from the conflation of two vernacular senses of representation: representation-as-origin and representation-as-input. The flash of a neon sign may in one sense represent a popular drink, but to function as a representation it must provide an input to a 'consumer' in the street...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Iryna Yavorska, Michael Wehr
Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles...
2016: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Keisuke Kaneko, Yuko Koyanagi, Yoshiyuki Oi, Masayuki Kobayashi
Propofol is a major intravenous anesthetic that facilitates GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic currents and modulates Ih, K(+), and voltage-gated Na(+) currents. This propofol-induced modulation of ionic currents changes intrinsic membrane properties and repetitive spike firing in cortical pyramidal neurons. However, it has been unknown whether propofol modulates these electrophysiological properties in GABAergic neurons, which express these ion channels at different levels. This study examined whether pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal properties are differentially modulated by propofol in the rat insular cortical slice preparation...
October 13, 2016: Neuroscience
Robert G Averkin, Viktor Szemenyei, Sándor Bordé, Gábor Tamás
Ultra-high-frequency network events in the hippocampus are instrumental in a dialogue with the neocortex during memory formation, but the existence of transient ∼200 Hz network events in the neocortex is not clear. Our recordings from neocortical layer II/III of freely behaving rats revealed field potential events at ripple and high-gamma frequencies repeatedly occurring at troughs of spindle oscillations during sleep. Juxtacellular recordings identified subpopulations of fast-spiking, parvalbumin-containing basket cells with epochs of firing at ripple (∼200 Hz) and high-gamma (∼120 Hz) frequencies detected during spindles and centered with millisecond precision at the trough of spindle waves in phase with field potential events but phase shifted relative to pyramidal cell firing...
October 12, 2016: Neuron
Timothy O'Leary, Eve Marder
Many species of cold-blooded animals experience substantial and rapid fluctuations in body temperature. Because biological processes are differentially temperature dependent, it is difficult to understand how physiological processes in such animals can be temperature robust [1-8]. Experiments have shown that core neural circuits, such as the pyloric circuit of the crab stomatogastric ganglion (STG), exhibit robust neural activity in spite of large (20°C) temperature fluctuations [3, 5, 7, 8]. This robustness is surprising because (1) each neuron has many different kinds of ion channels with different temperature dependencies (Q10s) that interact in a highly nonlinear way to produce firing patterns and (2) across animals there is substantial variability in conductance densities that nonetheless produce almost identical firing properties...
October 1, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"