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Working Memory

Michael K Yeung, Sophia L Sze, Jean Woo, Timothy Kwok, David H K Shum, Ruby Yu, Agnes S Chan
BACKGROUND: Some functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported altered activations in the frontal cortex during working memory (WM) performance in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but the findings have been mixed. The objective of the present study was to utilize near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), an alternative imaging technique, to examine neural processing during WM performance in individuals with MCI. METHODS: Twenty-six older adults with MCI (7 males; mean age 69...
October 27, 2016: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
André David Kovac, Maximilian Koall, Gordon Pipa, Hazem Toutounji
Delays are ubiquitous in biological systems, ranging from genetic regulatory networks and synaptic conductances, to predator/pray population interactions. The evidence is mounting, not only to the presence of delays as physical constraints in signal propagation speed, but also to their functional role in providing dynamical diversity to the systems that comprise them. The latter observation in biological systems inspired the recent development of a computational architecture that harnesses this dynamical diversity, by delay-coupling a single nonlinear element to itself...
2016: PloS One
Craig A Marshall, Ivan A Borbon, Robert P Erickson
Nicotinamide delivered in drinking water at about 2 g/kg/day significantly prolonged survival and showed a suggestive improvement on memory in the Npc1 (nih) / Npc1 (nih) mouse model of infantile NPC1 disease. It is likely that this role is due to its function as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor although another HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid, was without effect. Nicotinamide could also work by preventing/reversing oxidative stress.
October 25, 2016: Journal of Applied Genetics
Cynthia Huang-Pollock, Zvi Shapiro, Hilary Galloway-Long, Alex Weigard
In contrast to historical conceptualizations that framed psychological disorders as distinct, categorical conditions, it is now widely understood that co- and multi-morbidities between disorders are extensive. As a result, there has been a call to better understand the dimensional liabilities that are common to and influence the development of multiple psychopathologies, as supported and exemplified by the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework. We use a latent variable SEM approach to examine the degree to which working memory deficits represent a cognitive liability associated with the development of common and discrete dimensions of psychopathology...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Michael J Boivin, Horacio Ruiseñor-Escudero, Itziar Familiar-Lopez
There is growing concern that although the more severe forms of HIV-associated neurologic deficits are reduced following highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), mild to moderate cognitive disorders may persist for years after HAART initiation and this may occur despite complete plasma viral suppression. According to the UNAIDS 2014 report, there were 3.2 million children living with HIV around the world at the end of 2013 and 91 % of these resided in sub-Saharan Africa. In the same year, only 24 % of children who needed antiretroviral treatment (ART) received it and 190,000 children died of AIDS-related illnesses...
October 25, 2016: Current HIV/AIDS Reports
Geoffrey R Norman, Sandra D Monteiro, Jonathan Sherbino, Jonathan S Ilgen, Henk G Schmidt, Sylvia Mamede
Contemporary theories of clinical reasoning espouse a dual processing model, which consists of a rapid, intuitive component (Type 1) and a slower, logical and analytical component (Type 2). Although the general consensus is that this dual processing model is a valid representation of clinical reasoning, the causes of diagnostic errors remain unclear. Cognitive theories about human memory propose that such errors may arise from both Type 1 and Type 2 reasoning. Errors in Type 1 reasoning may be a consequence of the associative nature of memory, which can lead to cognitive biases...
October 25, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Tarun Sanghi, Ravi Bhadauria, N R Aluru
In this work, we use the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) to characterize and understand memory effects in nanoparticle dynamics and transport. Using the GLE formulation, we compute the memory function and investigate its scaling with the mass, shape, and size of the nanoparticle. It is observed that changing the mass of the nanoparticle leads to a rescaling of the memory function with the reduced mass of the system. Further, we show that for different mass nanoparticles it is the initial value of the memory function and not its relaxation time that determines the "memory" or "memoryless" dynamics...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Chemical Physics
Iam Choon Khoo, Chun-Wei Chen, Tsung-Jui Ho
In this paper, we show that photosensitive azo-dye doped Blue-phase liquid crystals (BPLC) formed by natural molecular self-assembly are capable of high diffraction efficiency holographic recording with memory that can be prolonged from few seconds to several minutes by uniform illumination with the reference beam. Operating in the Bragg regime, we have observed 50 times improvement in the grating diffraction efficiency and shorter recording time compared to previous investigations. The enabling mechanism is BPLC's lattice distortion and index modulation caused by the action of light on the azo-dopant; upon photo-excitation, the azo-molecules undergo transformation from the oblong-shaped Trans-state to the bent-shaped Cis-state, imparting disorder and also cause the surrounding BPLC molecules to undergo coupled flow &reorientation leading to lattice distortion and index modulation...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Xue-Feng Cheng, Er-Bo Shi, Xiang Hou, Shu-Gang Xia, Jing-Hui He, Qing-Feng Xu, Hua Li, Na-Jun Li, Dong-Yun Chen, Jian-Mei Lu
In this paper, two molecules based on urea and thiourea only differing by a single atom were designed, successfully synthesized and fabricated into resistive random access memory devices (RRAM). Urea-based molecule shows binary WORM storage behavior while thiourea-based molecule demonstrates ternary storage behavior. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that both two molecules have smooth morphology and ordered layer-by-layer lamellar packing, which is be beneficial to charge transportation and in consequence device performance...
October 26, 2016: Chemistry, An Asian Journal
Laura M Pidgeon, Madeleine Grealy, Alex H B Duffy, Laura Hay, Chris McTeague, Tijana Vuletic, Damien Coyle, Sam J Gilbert
INTRODUCTION: The generation of creative visual imagery contributes to technological and scientific innovation and production of visual art. The underlying cognitive and neural processes are, however, poorly understood. METHODS: This review synthesizes functional neuroimaging studies of visual creativity. Seven functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and 19 electroencephalography (EEG) studies were included, comprising 27 experiments and around 800 participants...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Alexandra Ursache, Kimberly G Noble
BACKGROUND: A growing body of evidence links socioeconomic status (SES) to children's brain structure. Few studies, however, have specifically investigated relations of SES to white matter structure. Further, although several studies have demonstrated that family SES is related to development of brain areas that support executive functions (EF), less is known about the role that white matter structure plays in the relation of SES to EF. One possibility is that white matter differences may partially explain SES disparities in EF (i...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Gulben Senturk, Basar Bilgic, Ali Bilgin Arslan, Ali Bayram, Hasmet Hanagasi, Hakan Gurvit, Murat Emre
BACKGROUND: Anosognosia is a common feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The brain substrates of anosognosia are not fully understood, and less is known about the cognitive substrates of anosognosia in prodromal and early stages of AD. METHODS: Fourty-seven patients with amnestic-type mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 26) and early-stage AD (n = 21) were included, and Clinical Insight Rating Scale and Anosognosia Questionnaire for Dementia (AQ-D) were used to assess anosognosia...
October 26, 2016: International Psychogeriatrics
Sean James Fallon, Marieke E van der Schaaf, Niels Ter Huurne, Roshan Cools
A balance has to be struck between supporting distractor-resistant representations in working memory and allowing those representations to be updated. Catecholamine, particularly dopamine, transmission has been proposed to modulate the balance between the stability and flexibility of working memory representations. However, it is unclear whether drugs that increase catecholamine transmission, such as methylphenidate, optimize this balance in a task-dependent manner or bias the system toward stability at the expense of flexibility (or vice versa)...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Raphael Kaplan, Daniel Bush, James A Bisby, Aidan J Horner, Sofie S Meyer, Neil Burgess
Hippocampal-medial prefrontal interactions are thought to play a crucial role in mental simulation. Notably, the frontal midline/medial pFC (mPFC) theta rhythm in humans has been linked to introspective thought and working memory. In parallel, theta rhythms have been proposed to coordinate processing in the medial temporal cortex, retrosplenial cortex (RSc), and parietal cortex during the movement of viewpoint in imagery, extending their association with physical movement in rodent models. Here, we used noninvasive whole-head MEG to investigate theta oscillatory power and phase-locking during the 18-sec postencoding delay period of a spatial working memory task, in which participants imagined previously learned object sequences either on a blank background (object maintenance), from a first-person viewpoint in a scene (static imagery), or moving along a path past the objects (dynamic imagery)...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Meghan M McConnell, Sandra Monteiro, Molly M Pottruff, Alan Neville, Geoff R Norman, Kevin W Eva, Kulamakan Kulasegaram
PURPOSE: Training to become a physician is an emotionally laden experience. Research in cognitive psychology indicates that emotions can influence learning and performance, but the materials used in such research (e.g., word lists) rarely reflect the complexity of material presented in medical school. The present study examined whether emotions influence learning of basic science principles. METHOD: Fifty-five undergraduate psychology students were randomly assigned to write about positive, negative, or neutral life events for nine minutes...
November 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Caroline de Oliveira Cardoso, Natália Dias, Joana Senger, Ana Paula Cervi Colling, Alessandra Gotuzo Seabra, Rochele Paz Fonseca
This systematic review aimed to characterize empirical studies on neuropsychological interventions to stimulate executive functions in children with typical development. Searches were conducted according to the PRISMA method. Nineteen (19) studies on the analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs in pre-school and school children were obtained. There was a predominance of studies that used computerized cognitive training, most of them involving the stimulation of working memory. Others used pen and paper forms, or hybrid tasks, and some programs used a school curriculum approach aiming to improve self-regulation...
October 25, 2016: Applied Neuropsychology. Child
Thomas G Burns, Natasha N Ludwig, Tiffany N Tajiri, Nick DeFilippis
The objective of this study was to assess cognitive performance and behavioral symptoms in a sample of children diagnosed with partial epilepsy who were seizure controlled on AED monotherapy for one year. Ninety-eight seizure-controlled children on AED monotherapy were included in this study. Specific AEDs examined included topiramate, divalproex sodium, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and oxcarbazepine. Groups did not differ on age, region of focal epilepsy, or Full-Scale IQ. Direct measures included the WISC-IV and selected tests from the DKEFS (Verbal Fluency and Trail Making Test)...
October 25, 2016: Applied Neuropsychology. Child
Franklin P Tamborello, J Gregory Trafton
OBJECTIVE: A computational process model could explain how the dynamic interaction of human cognitive mechanisms produces each of multiple error types. BACKGROUND: With increasing capability and complexity of technological systems, the potential severity of consequences of human error is magnified. Interruption greatly increases people's error rates, as does the presence of other information to maintain in an active state. METHOD: The model executed as a software-instantiated Monte Carlo simulation...
October 24, 2016: Human Factors
V S Kokhan, M I Matveeva, A S Bazyan, V S Kudrin, A Mukhametov, A S Shtemberg
Space flight factors (SFF) significantly affect the operating activity of astronauts during deep space missions. In contrast to an orbital flight, leaving the Earth's magnetic field is fraught with the dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation and more specifically, the high-energy nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays. Microgravity, just another critical non-radiation factor, significantly affects the normal functioning of the CNS. Some morphological structures of the brain, such as the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, that are rich in monoaminergic and acetylcholinergic neurones, are the most sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation and non-radiation spaceflight factors (SFF)...
October 21, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Hong-Yan Cai, Zhao-Jun Wang, Christian Hölscher, Li Yuan, Jun Zhang, Peng Sun, Jing Li, Wei Yang, Mei-Na Wu, Jin-Shun Qi
Type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) is a risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is most likely linked to impairments of insulin signaling in the brain. Hence, drugs enhancing insulin signaling may have therapeutic potential for AD. Lixisenatide, a novel long-lasting glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue, facilitates insulin signaling and has neuroprotective properties. We previously reported the protective effects of lixisenatide on memory formation and synaptic plasticity. Here, we describe additional key neuroprotective properties of lixisenatide and its possible molecular and cellular mechanisms against AD-related impairments in rats...
October 21, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
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