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Words that make a difference

Joshua L Fiechter, Aaron S Benjamin
In five experiments, we investigated whether expected retention intervals affect subjects' encoding strategies. In the first four experiments, our subjects studied paired associates consisting of words from the Graduate Record Exam and a synonym. They were told to expect a test on a word pair after either a short or a longer interval. Subjects were tested on most pairs after the expected retention interval. For some pairs, however, subjects were tested after the other retention interval, allowing for a comparison of performance at a given retention interval conditional upon the expected retention interval...
October 21, 2016: Memory & Cognition
Sverre Kjeldsen
There is a whole armament of good drugs for treatment of hypertension including diuretics, calcium antagonist, angiotensin receptor antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Secondary drugs mostly used for special indications include beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (aldosterone antagonists), renin-inhibitors, centrally acting drugs, direct vasodilators and others.A variety of new drugs targeting different pressor mechanism exist and have partly been studies experimentally but will unlikely make it to clinical use in human hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Adrian Noriega De La Colina, Rong Wu, Laurence Desjardins-Crépeau, Pierre Larochelle, Maxime Lamarre-Cliche, Louis Bherer, Hélène Girouard
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess cognitive performance in older adults treated and controlled for blood pressure (BP) when compared to untreated normotensive subjects, and to determine whether blood pressure still correlates with poorer cognitive performances. DESIGN AND METHOD: Forty-eight older adults aged between 65 and 85 years were recruited in the community and divided into two groups: normotensive (n = 26) and controlled hypertensive (n = 22)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Keith E Pearson, Virginia G Wadley, Leslie A McClure, James M Shikany, Fred W Unverzagt, Suzanne E Judd
Identifying factors that contribute to the preservation of cognitive function is imperative to maintaining quality of life in advanced years. Of modifiable risk factors, diet quality has emerged as a promising candidate to make an impact on cognition. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between empirically derived dietary patterns and cognitive function. This study included 18 080 black and white participants aged 45 years and older from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort...
2016: Journal of Nutritional Science
Jingyang Jiang, Jinghui Ouyang, Haitao Liu
Language is not only the representation of thinking, but also shapes thinking. Studies on bilinguals suggest that a foreign language plays an important and unconscious role in thinking. In this study, a software-Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count 2007-was used to investigate whether the learning of English as a foreign language (EFL) can foster Chinese high school students' English analytic thinking (EAT) through the analysis of their English writings with our self-built corpus. It was found that: (1) learning English can foster Chinese learners' EAT...
2016: PloS One
Timothy R Jordan, Jasmine Dixon, Victoria A McGowan, Stoyan Kurtev, Kevin B Paterson
Recent research has shown that differences in the effectiveness of spatial frequencies for fast and slow skilled adult readers may be an important component of differences in reading ability in the skilled adult reading population (Jordan et al., 2016a). But the precise nature of this influence on lexical processing during reading remains to be fully determined. Accordingly, to gain more insight into the use of spatial frequencies by skilled adult readers with fast and slow reading abilities, the present study looked at effects of spatial frequencies on the processing of specific target words in sentences...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Salvo Fedele
This is a letter to a young friend who has become a paediatrician. It is a senior paediatrician, trying to transmit something useful, that writes it. The lives of those who care are made of many human relationships, a lot of reading, more different interpretations of these relationships and these readings. Each of us will build over the years their ethical model, their ability to discuss new problems and new cases with colleagues, their ability to critically analyse the scientific literature as well as the willingness to listen to patients and families...
September 2016: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
Amelia Barwise, Lisbeth Garcia-Arguello, Yue Dong, Manasi Hulyalkar, Marija Vukoja, Marcus J Schultz, Neill K J Adhikari, Benjamin Bonneton, Oguz Kilickaya, Rahul Kashyap, Ognjen Gajic, Christopher N Schmickl
BACKGROUND: The Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN) is an international collaborative project with the overall objective of standardizing the approach to the evaluation and treatment of critically ill patients world-wide, in accordance with best-practice principles. One of CERTAIN's key features is clinical decision support providing point-of-care information about common acute illness syndromes, procedures, and medications in an index card format...
October 3, 2016: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Susan Smith, James Fisher, Iain Goff
BACKGROUND: During their training, medical students are expected to acquire the ability to use thousands of new terms that make up the medical lexicon. Clear communication requires knowledge of this lexicon. We developed a simple word game, MediLex, to facilitate the development of these skills. This paper describes the intervention and evaluates students' experiences. METHODS: MediLex is a card-based description game played in small groups. One hundred cards contain 500 medical terms grouped into five categories...
October 6, 2016: Clinical Teacher
Nancy Krieger, George Davey Smith
'Causal inference', in 21st century epidemiology, has notably come to stand for a specific approach, one focused primarily on counterfactual and potential outcome reasoning and using particular representations, such as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) and Bayesian causal nets. In this essay, we suggest that in epidemiology no one causal approach should drive the questions asked or delimit what counts as useful evidence. Robust causal inference instead comprises a complex narrative, created by scientists appraising, from diverse perspectives, different strands of evidence produced by myriad methods...
September 30, 2016: International Journal of Epidemiology
B Lipový, H Řihová, M Hanslianová, I Suchánek, P Brychta
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an autoimmune disease which is usually caused by a reaction to drugs. It affects mainly the skin and mucous membranes. It is a rare condition with a high mortality rate. Fatal outcomes in patients with TEN are mostly due to infectious complications. As antimicrobial drugs may induce this syndrome, the management of this condition is very complicated. Tigecycline is still a relatively new antibiotic approved in Europe for use in complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated skin and soft tissue infections...
2016: Epidemiologie, Mikrobiologie, Imunologie
Beth Fairfield, Alberto Di Domenico, Sonia Serricchio, Erika Borella, Nicola Mammarella
Prosody, or the way things are said, can modify the meaning of utterances making qualitatively different affective prosodies useful for understanding how auditory affective information is processed and remembered. In this study, we collected behavioral data from 225 younger (M age = 20.8 years, SD = 2.5 years; 119 males) and 225 older adults (M age = 71.6 years, SD = 6.5 years; 119 males) in order to examine age differences in emotional prosody effects on verbal memory. Participants were randomly divided into three subgroups according to different prosody listening conditions (positive, negative, and neutral) and prosody effects on a yes-no recognition memory task were investigated...
August 10, 2016: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
Gildas Brébion, Christian Stephan-Otto, Susana Ochoa, Mercedes Roca, Lourdes Nieto, Judith Usall
BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that various memory errors reflecting failure in the self-monitoring of speech were associated with auditory/verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia patients and with proneness to hallucinations in non-clinical individuals. METHOD: We administered to 57 schizophrenia patients and 60 healthy participants a verbal memory task involving free recall and recognition of lists of words with different structures (high-frequency, low-frequency, and semantically organisable words)...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Ashley Gaal Flagge, Julie M Estis, Robert E Moore
Purpose: The relationship between short-term memory for phonology and pitch was explored by examining accuracy scores for typically developing children for 5 experimental tasks: immediate nonword repetition (NWR), nonword repetition with an 8-s silent interference (NWRS), pitch discrimination (PD), pitch discrimination with an 8-s silent interference (PDS), and pitch matching (PM). Method: Thirty-six 7- and 8-year-old children (21 girls, 15 boys) with normal hearing, language, and cognition were asked to listen to and repeat nonsense words (NWR, NWRS), make a same versus different decision between 2 tones (PD, PDS), and listen to and then vocally reproduce a tone (PM)...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
I Petruschke, B Ramsauer, T Borde, M David
Introduction: The starting point of this study was the considerably lower rate of epidural analgesia use among women of Turkish origin in Germany compared to non-immigrant women in the German Research Foundation (DFG)-funded study entitled "Perinatal Health and Migration Berlin". The study aimed to identify possible differences in the women's attitudes towards epidural analgesia. Methods: Exploratory study with semi-structured interviews, interviews lasting 17 minutes on average were conducted with 19 women of Turkish origin and 11 non-immigrant women at a Berlin hospital...
September 2016: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde
Afrodita Marcu, Georgia Black, Peter Vedsted, Georgios Lyratzopoulos, Katriina L Whitaker
OBJECTIVE: Advanced stage at diagnosis for breast cancer is associated with lower socio-economic status (SES). We explored what factors in the patient interval (time from noticing a bodily change to first consultation with a health care professional) may contribute to this inequality. DESIGN: Qualitative comparative study. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with a sample of women (≥47 years) from higher (n = 15) and lower (n = 15) educational backgrounds, who had experienced at least one potential breast cancer symptom...
September 29, 2016: British Journal of Health Psychology
Kristen M Beavers, Iris Leng, Stephen R Rapp, Michael E Miller, Denise K Houston, Anthony P Marsh, Don G Hire, Laura D Baker, George A Bray, George L Blackburn, Andrea L Hergenroeder, John M Jakicic, Karen C Johnson, Mary T Korytkowski, Brent Van Dorsten, Stephen B Kritchevsky
OBJECTIVES: To test whether average long-term glucose exposure is associated with cognitive and physical function in middle-aged and younger-old adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Data obtained as part of the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial (NCT00017953) and Look AHEAD Movement and Memory ancillary study (NCT01410097). PARTICIPANTS: Overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged 45 to 76 at baseline (N = 879)...
September 27, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Lisa Cipolotti, Barbara Spanò, Colm Healy, Carina Tudor-Sfetea, Edgar Chan, Mark White, Francesca Biondo, John Duncan, Tim Shallice, Marco Bozzali
The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to make fundamental contributions to executive functions. However, the precise nature of these contributions is incompletely understood. We focused on a specific executive function, inhibition, the ability to suppress a pre-potent response. Functional imaging and animal studies have studied inhibition. However, there are only few lesion studies, typically reporting discrepant findings. For the first time, we conducted cognitive and neuroimaging investigations on patients with focal unilateral PFC lesions across two widely used inhibitory tasks requiring a verbal response: The Hayling Part 2 and Stroop Colour-Word Tests...
September 23, 2016: Neuropsychologia
Alexa Ross, Samantha Ward, Paul Hyman
Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Sverre Kjeldsen
There is a whole armament of good drugs for treatment of hypertension including diuretics, calcium antagonist, angiotensin receptor antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Secondary drugs mostly used for special indications include beta-blockers, alpha-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (aldosterone antagonists), renin-inhibitors, centrally acting drugs, direct vasodilators and others.A variety of new drugs targeting different pressor mechanism exist and have partly been studies experimentally but will unlikely make it to clinical use in human hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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