Read by QxMD icon Read

Ultrasound and emergency medicine and lung

Lori A Stolz, Uwe Stolz, J Matthew Fields, Turandot Saul, Michael Secko, Matthew J Flannigan, Johnathan M Sheele, Robert P Rifenburg, Anthony J Weekes, Elaine B Josephson, John Bedolla, Dana M Resop, Jonathan Dela Cruz, Megan Boysen-Osborn, Terrell Caffery, Charlotte Derr, Rimon Bengiamin, Gerardo Chiricolo, Brandon Backlund, Jagdipak Heer, Robert J Hyde, Srikar Adhikari
OBJECTIVES: Emergency ultrasound (EUS) has been recognized as integral to the training and practice of emergency medicine (EM). The Council of Emergency Medicine Residency-Academy of Emergency Ultrasound (CORD-AEUS) consensus document provides guidelines for resident assessment and progression. The Accredited Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has adopted the EM Milestones for assessment of residents' progress during their residency training which includes demonstration of procedural competency in bedside ultrasound...
October 14, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Amit Kumar Mittal, Namrata Gupta
In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition...
July 2016: Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology
Yahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati Salman, Erdem Cevik, Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-Bordomás, Mustafa Z Mahmoud, Abdelmoneim Sulieman, Abbas Ali, Alrayah Mustafa, Ihab Abdelrahman, Mustafa Bahar, Osama Ali, H Lester Kirchner, Gregor Prosen, Ajda Anzic, Paul Leeson, Maryam Bahreini, Fatemeh Rasooli, Houman Hosseinnejad, Gabriel Blecher, Robert Meek, Diana Egerton-Warburton, Edina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz Kovačević, Nadan Rustemović, Ikwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun Kim, Chi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te Kung, Ela Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan Radonić, Abiola Fasina, Anthony J Dean, Nova L Panebianco, Patricia S Henwood, Oliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio Bonanomi, Ivan Tomić, Youngrock Ha, Hongchuen Toh, Elizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Angela Hua, Sharon Kim, James Tsung, Isa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan Ay, Jinjoo Kim, Jinhyun Kim, Gyoosung Choi, Dowon Shim, Ji-Han Lee, Jana Ambrozic, Katja Prokselj, Miha Lucovnik, Gabrijela Brzan Simenc, Asta Mačiulienė, Almantas Maleckas, Algimantas Kriščiukaitis, Vytautas Mačiulis, Andrius Macas, Sharad Mohite, Zoltan Narancsik, Hugon Možina, Sara Nikolić, Jan Hansel, Rok Petrovčič, Una Mršić, Simon Orlob, Markus Lerchbaumer, Niklas Schönegger, Reinhard Kaufmann, Chun-I Pan, Chien-Hung Wu, Sarah Pasquale, Stephanie J Doniger, Sharon Yellin, Gerardo Chiricolo, Maja Potisek, Borut Drnovšek, Boštjan Leskovar, Kristine Robinson, Clara Kraft, Benjamin Moser, Stephen Davis, Shelley Layman, Yusef Sayeed, Joseph Minardi, Irmina Sefic Pasic, Amra Dzananovic, Anes Pasic, Sandra Vegar Zubovic, Ana Godan Hauptman, Ana Vujaklija Brajkovic, Jaksa Babel, Marina Peklic, Vedran Radonic, Luka Bielen, Peh Wee Ming, Nur Hafiza Yezid, Fatahul Laham Mohammed, Zainal Abidin Huda, Wan Nasarudin Wan Ismail, W Yus Haniff W Isa, Hashairi Fauzi, Praveena Seeva, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan
A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization...
September 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Chiara Mozzini, Anna Maria Fratta Pasini, Ulisse Garbin, Luciano Cominacini
BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound (LUS) represents an emerging technique for bedside chest imaging in different clinical settings. A standardized approach allows the diagnosis, the quantification, and the follow-up of different conditions for which acute respiratory failure is the main clinical presentation. The aim of this study was to test what skill targets could be achieved in LUS, with a short-training course offered to 19 Medical Doctors attending the certification board school in Internal Medicine at the University of Verona, Italy...
December 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
Thomas Edrich, Matthias Stopfkuchen-Evans, Patrick Scheiermann, Markus Heim, Wilma Chan, Michael B Stone, Daniel Dankl, Jonathan Aichner, Dominik Hinzmann, Pingping Song, Ashley L Szabo, Gyorgy Frendl, Kamen Vlassakov, Dirk Varelmann
BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a well-established method that can exclude pneumothorax by demonstration of pleural sliding and the associated ultrasound artifacts. The positive diagnosis of pneumothorax is more difficult to obtain and relies on detection of the edge of a pneumothorax, called the "lung point." Yet, anesthesiologists are not widely taught these techniques, even though their patients are susceptible to pneumothorax either through trauma or as a result of central line placement or regional anesthesia techniques performed near the thorax...
July 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Başak Bayram, Önder Limon, Gülsüm Limon, Volkan Hancı
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We identify and characterize the most highly cited articles related to ultrasonographic evaluations occurring in the emergency department. METHOD: We retrieved the top 100 articles in terms of citations pertaining to ultrasonographic evaluations in the emergency department from the Scopus database. We determined the number of citations of each article, the number of citations per year, the number of Google Scholar citations, the ultrasonographical study fields, the number of patients evaluated in each study, and the specialties of the researchers conducting the studies and ultrasonographies...
July 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
N Yousef
Lung ultrasound (LU) is becoming a bedside point-of-care technique in critical care and emergency medicine as it is performed and immediately interpreted by the clinician. LU is quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and provides accurate diagnostic information when compared with conventional lung imaging methods, such as CT scans and chest radiographs, with the additional advantage of being non-irradiating, adapted to bedside use, and easily repeatable with no side effects for the patient. LU is easy to learn, does not require sophisticated ultrasound machines or settings, and shows low intra- and interobserver variability when a standardized approach is used...
March 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Daniel Mantuani, Bradley W Frazee, Jahan Fahimi, Arun Nagdev
INTRODUCTION: Determining the etiology of acute dyspnea in emregency department (ED) patients is often difficult. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) holds promise for improving immediate diagnostic accuracy (after history and physical), thus improving use of focused therapies. We evaluate the impact of a three-part POCUS exam, or "triple scan" (TS) - composed of abbreviated echocardiography, lung ultrasound and inferior vena cava (IVC) collapsibility assessment - on the treating physician's immediate diagnostic impression...
January 2016: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Ron Berant, Charisse Kwan, Jason Fischer
Point-of-care ultrasound is being used more frequently in pediatric emergency medicine departments. It has become an important adjunct for clinical diagnoses and procedural guidance. We present a case series of 3 patients who presented to a pediatric emergency department and on chest radiographs had whiteout lung. Point-of-care ultrasound was able to differentiate fluid from consolidation, facilitating the appropriate investigations and interventions for these children.
December 2015: Pediatric Emergency Care
F Lapostolle, S Deltour, T Petrovic
Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.
December 2015: Annales de Cardiologie et D'angéiologie
Toru Kameda
The performance of ultrasound (US) devices is improving every year, and more advanced US is being conducted in laboratory settings with high-end machines. Meanwhile, portable US devices, which have become less expensive and of a higher quality, have come into widespread use at bedsides in emergency rooms, intensive care units, and general wards. In recent years, the concept of point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) has been widely accepted. POCUS performed at the bedside in acute care settings has value if it gives clinicians useful clinical information in a short time...
June 2015: Rinsho Byori. the Japanese Journal of Clinical Pathology
Daniel A Lichtenstein
This review article describes two protocols adapted from lung ultrasound: the bedside lung ultrasound in emergency (BLUE)-protocol for the immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure and the fluid administration limited by lung sonography (FALLS)-protocol for the management of acute circulatory failure. These applications require the mastery of 10 signs indicating normal lung surface (bat sign, lung sliding, A-lines), pleural effusions (quad and sinusoid sign), lung consolidations (fractal and tissue-like sign), interstitial syndrome (lung rockets), and pneumothorax (stratosphere sign and the lung point)...
June 2015: Chest
Alan T Chiem, Connie H Chan, Douglas S Ander, Andrew N Kobylivker, William C Manson
OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the ability of emergency physicians who are not experts in emergency ultrasound (US) to perform lung ultrasonography and to identify B-lines. The hypothesis was that novice sonographers are able to perform lung US and identify B-lines after a brief intervention. In addition, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of B-lines in undifferentiated dyspneic patients for the diagnosis of acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS), using an eight-lung-zone technique as well as an abbreviated two-lung-zone technique...
May 2015: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Mohammad Al Deeb, Skye Barbic, Robin Featherstone, Jerrald Dankoff, David Barbic
OBJECTIVES: Acute dyspnea is a common presenting complaint to the emergency department (ED), and point-of-care (POC) lung ultrasound (US) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool in this setting. The primary objective of this systematic review was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of US using B-lines in diagnosing acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) in patients presenting to the ED with acute dyspnea. METHODS: A systematic review protocol adhering to Cochrane Handbook guidelines was created to guide the search and analysis, and we searched the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews...
August 2014: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Cédric Carrié, Matthieu Biais, Stéphane Lafitte, Nicolas Grenier, Philippe Revel, Gérard Janvier
OBJECTIVE: This observational study aimed to define the learning curve in goal-directed ultrasound (US) after a 2-day training course dedicated to novice emergency residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After completion of the training program, 180 patients requiring goal-directed US examination were examined by a resident and by an experienced investigator. The main endpoints were the diagnostic agreement between the two operators for 14 clinical questions, the duration of the examinations, the number of nonaddressed questions, and the final diagnosis...
December 2015: European Journal of Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine
Srikar Adhikari, Wesley Zeger, Michael Wadman, Richard Walker, Carol Lomneth
OBJECTIVES: To assess a human cadaver model for training emergency medicine residents in the ultrasound diagnosis of pneumothorax. METHODS: Single-blinded observational study using a human cadaveric model at an academic medical center. Three lightly embalmed cadavers were used to create three "normal lungs" and three lungs modeling a "pneumothorax." The residents were blinded to the side and number of pneumothoraces, as well as to each other's findings. Each resident performed an ultrasound examination on all six lung models during ventilation of cadavers...
2014: BioMed Research International
Daniel Lichtenstein
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Lung ultrasound, which allows a bedside visualization of the lungs, is increasingly used in critical care. This review aims at highlighting a simple approach to this new discipline. RECENT FINDINGS: The 10 basic signs are the bat sign (indicating pleural line), lung sliding (yielding the seashore sign), the A line (horizontal artifact), the quad and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion regardless of its echogenicity, the tissue-like and shred sign indicating lung consolidation, the B line and lung rockets (artifacts indicating interstitial syndrome), abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign, suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point, indicating pneumothorax...
June 2014: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Miguel A Chavez, Navid Shams, Laura E Ellington, Neha Naithani, Robert H Gilman, Mark C Steinhoff, Mathuram Santosham, Robert E Black, Carrie Price, Margaret Gross, William Checkley
BACKGROUND: Guidelines do not currently recommend the use of lung ultrasound (LUS) as an alternative to chest X-ray (CXR) or chest computerized tomography (CT) scan for the diagnosis of pneumonia. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize existing evidence of the diagnostic accuracy of LUS for pneumonia in adults. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of published studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of LUS against a referent CXR or chest CT scan and/or clinical criteria for pneumonia in adults aged ≥18 years...
2014: Respiratory Research
Rafael Alba Yunen, John Oropello, Andrew Leibowitz
SESSION TITLE: Pleural Case Report PostersSESSION TYPE: Case Report PosterPRESENTED ON: Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 01:15 PM - 02:15 PMINTRODUCTION: Lung sliding (LS), visceral pleura moving against parietal pleura, is a lung ultrasound (LU) finding that rules out a complete pneumothorax (PTX) (1). We present a case of apparent complete left PTX in the presence of LS. CASE PRESENTATION: A 90 year old female treated for lower extremity cellulitis and recurrent urinary tract infections was admitted to the SICU with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, pulmonary edema, and sepsis requiring volume control ventilation...
March 1, 2014: Chest
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"