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Child respiratory disease

M Y Tan, L N Tan, M M Aw, S H Quak, S V Karthik
HBoV is an emergent virus, which is frequently detected as a co-infective agent. However, it can cause disease on its own. It is associated with respiratory and diarrhoeal illness in children and adults, whether immunocompetent or immunocompromised. We report HBoV infection in a child post-liver transplantation, who presented with persistent fever and mild tachypnea, 3 weeks after a successful transplant. She recovered spontaneously with no graft dysfunction.
October 23, 2016: Pediatric Transplantation
J A Bohn, B M Kassaye, D Record, B C Chou, I L Kraft, J C Purdy, K A Hilton, D A Miller, S Getachew, A Addissie, J A Robison
BACKGROUND: Global childhood mortality rates remain high. Millennium Development Goal 4 focused efforts on reducing rates by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In Ethiopia, child mortality rates dropped 71 % from 1990 to 2015, however it is estimated that 184,000 Ethiopian children die each year. There is limited information about pediatric hospital admissions in Ethiopia. Our aims were to examine the temporal relationship of mortality to admission, describe the demographics, and identify cause mortality of children admitted to the Zewditu Memorial Hospital (ZMH)...
October 21, 2016: BMC Pediatrics
Matthias An der Heiden, Udo Buchholz
BACKGROUND: The total burden of influenza in primary care is difficult to assess. The case definition of medically attended "acute respiratory infection" (MAARI) in the German physician sentinel is sensitive, however it requires modelling techniques to derive estimates of disease attributable to influenza. We aimed to examine the impact of type/subtype and age. METHODS: Data on MAARI and virological results of respiratory samples (virological sentinel) were available from 2001/02 until 2014/15...
October 18, 2016: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses
Tanja Radovanovic, Slobodan Spasojevic, Vesna Stojanovic, Aleksandra Doronjski
INTRODUCTION: An apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) is defined as "an episode that is frightening to the observer and is characterized by some combination of apnea, color change, marked change of muscle tone, choking, or gagging." OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to determine etiology and outcome of severe ALTE (requiring resuscitation measures) and to review diagnostic approaches in infants hospitalized after such an episode of ALTE. METHODS: Retrospective analysis included patients hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit, Institute of Child and Youth Healthcare of Vojvodina, after an episode of severe ALTE over a 4-year period...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Alexander G Athey, Megan E Mignemi, William T Gheen, Eduardo A Lindsay, Chan-Hee Jo, Lawson A Copley
BACKGROUND: Children with osteomyelitis demonstrate a wide spectrum of illness. Objective measurement of severity is important to guide resource allocation and treatment decisions, particularly for children with advanced illness. The purpose of this study is to validate and improve a previously published severity of illness scoring system for children with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO). METHODS: Children with AHO were prospectively studied during evaluation and treatment by a multidisciplinary team who provided care according to evidence-based guidelines to reduce variation...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: Established in 2000, Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) catalysed extraordinary political, financial, and social commitments to reduce under-5 mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. At the country level, the pace of progress in improving child survival has varied markedly, highlighting a crucial need to further examine potential drivers of accelerated or slowed decreases in child mortality. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides an analytical framework to comprehensively assess these trends for under-5 mortality, age-specific and cause-specific mortality among children under 5 years, and stillbirths by geography over time...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1980 to 2015. These results informed an in-depth investigation of observed and expected mortality patterns based on sociodemographic measures. METHODS: We estimated all-cause mortality by age, sex, geography, and year using an improved analytical approach originally developed for GBD 2013 and GBD 2010...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
Mariana Matera Veras, Nilmara de Oliveira Alves, Lais Fajersztajn, Paulo Saldiva
Various environmental contaminants are known to impair the growth trajectories of major organs, indirectly (gestational exposure) or directly (postnatal exposure). Evidence associates pre-gestational and gestational exposure to air pollutants with adverse birth outcomes (e.g., low birth weight, prematurity) and with a wide range of diseases in childhood and later in life. In this review, we explore the way that pre-gestational and gestational exposure to air pollution affects lung development. We present results in topics underlining epidemiological and toxicological evidence...
October 10, 2016: Cell and Tissue Research
Hee Joung Choi, Yeo Hyang Kim
An apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) is defined as the combination of clinical presentations such as apnea, marked change in skin and muscle tone, gagging, or choking. It is a frightening event, and it predominantly occurs during infancy at a mean age of 1-3 months. The causes of ALTE are categorized into problems that are: gastrointestinal (50%), neurological (30%), respiratory (20%), cardiovascular (5%), metabolic and endocrine (2%-5%), or others such as child abuse. Up to 50% of ALTEs are idiopathic, where the cause cannot be diagnosed...
September 2016: Korean Journal of Pediatrics
Sophie Desmonde, Tessa Goetghebuer, Claire Thorne, Valériane Leroy
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The number of HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) infants exposed to both HIV and multiple antiretroviral drugs in utero and during prolonged breastfeeding is increasing in low-income countries where HIV prevalence is the highest. We review recent evidence on the effects of perinatal/postnatal exposure to maternal HIV and combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on health outcomes of HEU children (mitochondrial and metabolic toxicity, adverse pregnancy outcomes, neurodevelopment, growth, infectious morbidity, and mortality)...
September 2016: Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS
William I Wooten, Marianne S Muhlebach, Joseph Muenzer, Ceila E Loughlin, Bradley V Vaughn
Mucolipidosis II (Inclusion cell or I-cell disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder clinically comparable to the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), characterized by progressive respiratory and neurologic deterioration. Sleep problems, especially obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and disrupted sleep architecture, are observed in other lysosomal storage diseases but have not been described in mucolipidosis II. We report the progression of polysomnographic abnormalities in a child with mucolipidosis II, demonstrated by worsening sleep-related hypoventilation, OSA, and sleep state fragmentation despite advancing PAP therapy...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Michele Valmasoni, Elisa Sefora Pierobon, Carlo Alberto De Pasqual, Gianpietro Zanchettin, Lucia Moletta, Renato Salvador, Mario Costantini, Alberto Ruol, Stefano Merigliano
BACKGROUND: Cirrhosis is a risk factor with nonhepatic surgery, but only three series regarding esophagectomy are reported. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score has shown benefit in risk evaluation, but there is no experience regarding esophagectomy. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of surgery for esophageal cancer between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients and to evaluate whether the MELD score has a prognostic value for risk stratification. METHODS: From the authors' esophageal cancer database, they selected all the patients with concomitant cirrhosis who underwent surgery with curative intent and a matched cohort of patients without cirrhosis...
October 4, 2016: Annals of Surgical Oncology
Dubravka Negovetić Vranić, Josipa Jurković, Jesenka Jeličić, Antonija Balenović, Gordana Stipančić, Ivana Čuković-Bagić
Medical emergencies that are life threatening can occur in dental practice. Complications may arise because of an underlying disease or a reaction to medication. Reactions to medications may be allergic and toxic. The most common reactions are toxic reactions to local anesthetics, whereas allergies occur mainly as a consequence of the application of antibiotics, usually penicillin. In response to stress, vasovagal syncope typically occurs. Other causes may be related to an underlying disease-specific pathology (such as acute asthma attack, diabetic ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, or seizures) or accidents (aspiration of a foreign body causing obstruction of the respiratory system)...
March 2016: Acta Stomatologica Croatica
Helen Elsey, Shraddha Manandah, Dilip Sah, Sudeepa Khanal, Frances MacGuire, Rebecca King, Hilary Wallace, Sushil Chandra Baral
BACKGROUND: Communities in urban slums face multiple risks to their health. These are shaped by intermediary and structural determinants. Gaining a clear understanding of these determinants is a prerequisite for developing interventions to reduce the health consequences of urban poverty. With 828 million people living in slum conditions, the need to find ways to reduce risks to health has never been greater. In many low income settings, the kitchen is the epicentre of activities and behaviours which either undermine or enhance health...
2016: PloS One
Maryam Oskoui, Pamela Ng, Stephen Liben, David Zielinski
BACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of families are requesting active supportive management for their child with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1), leading to longer survival and greater prevalence of affected children. Strong opinions exist among physicians for and against the provision of care measures prolonging life. OBJECTIVE: To describe current practice in the care of SMA1 in Canada, and explore the factors underlying inter-physician variability. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of Canadian hospital-based pediatric neurologists and pediatric respirologists was performed in 2015...
September 29, 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
A L Slogrove, L Frigati, D M Gray
With improved prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV, paediatric HIV disease is less common. However, the number of HIV exposed but uninfected infants is growing. Exposure to maternal HIV impacts infant respiratory health through an increase in known risk factors such as increased preterm birth and low birth weight, suboptimal breastfeeding, increased psychosocial stressors and increased exposure to infective pathogens. Exposure to the HIV virus and altered maternal immune environment result in immunologic changes in the infant that may contribute to respiratory disease risk...
August 19, 2016: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews
Ann Haerskjold, Marie Linder, Lonny Henriksen, Simon Francis Thomsen, Helle Kieler, Henrik Ravn, Lone Graff Stensballe
BACKGROUND: Treatment with biologic pharmaceuticals may be associated with an increased risk of immune-mediated disease. Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus infection. Palivizumab is primarily used in preterm children known to be immunologically immature. The long-term effect of palivizumab in terms of autoimmune diseases has not yet been investigated. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases in children...
September 24, 2016: Paediatric Drugs
Melissa C Bartick, Eleanor Bimla Schwarz, Brittany D Green, Briana J Jegier, Arnold G Reinhold, Tarah T Colaizy, Debra L Bogen, Andrew J Schaefer, Alison M Stuebe
The aim of this study was to quantify the excess cases of pediatric and maternal disease, death, and costs attributable to suboptimal breastfeeding rates in the United States. Using the current literature on the associations between breastfeeding and health outcomes for nine pediatric and five maternal diseases, we created Monte Carlo simulations modeling a hypothetical cohort of U.S. women followed from age 15 to age 70 years and their children from birth to age 20 years. We examined disease outcomes using (a) 2012 breastfeeding rates and (b) assuming that 90% of infants were breastfed according to medical recommendations...
September 19, 2016: Maternal & Child Nutrition
Ramesh Devkota, G M Khan, Kadir Alam, Amisha Regmi, Binaya Sapkota
BACKGROUND: Drugs used during pregnancy can adversely affect the health and life of the mother and unborn child. However, the fact that drugs are needed to mitigate complications during pregnancy cannot be avoided. The present study was designed to identify the common complications during pregnancy and assess the medications that have been used to mitigate those complications in an attempt to improve drug prescribing during pregnancy. METHODS: A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Nepal in 275 pregnant women presenting with at least one complication and the drugs prescribed for the management of those complications were analyzed...
2016: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Amy Cheng, Feifei Williams, James Fortenberry, Catherine Preissig, Steven Salinas, Pradip Kamat
Ehrlichiosis, caused by transmission of Ehrlichia chaffeensis to humans through the bite of an infected lone star tick, can lead to secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a life-threatening condition caused by uncontrolled activation of the cellular immune system. We describe a child with HLH secondary to ehrlichiosis who developed multiorgan failure and was successfully managed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A 9-year-old boy developed headaches, fever, and sore throat after suspected tick exposure...
September 15, 2016: Pediatrics
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