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Infectous diseases

Edouard Louis
Biologic treatments have revolutionized the way we treat inflammatory bowel disease patients (IBD). Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) antibodies are superior to conventional therapies to achieve sustained remission without steroids and mucosal healing. The objective of IBD treatment has evolved from symptom alleviation to a combination of absence of symptoms and intestinal healing. Nevertheless, biologics are expensive and are associated with an increased risk of infections and possibly skin cancers. Therefore, the duration of these treatments may be questioned, and stopping them may be contemplated by some patients and clinicians, while it is sometimes even imposed by some jurisdictions across the world...
March 14, 2018: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Theodore Gouliouris, Ben Warne, Edward J P Cartwright, Luke Bedford, Chathika K Weerasuriya, Kathy E Raven, Nick M Brown, M Estée Török, Direk Limmathurotsakul, Sharon J Peacock
Background: VRE bacteraemia has a high mortality and continues to defy control. Antibiotic risk factors for VRE bacteraemia have not been adequately defined. We aimed to determine the risk factors for VRE bacteraemia focusing on duration of antibiotic exposure. Methods: A retrospective matched nested case-control study was conducted amongst hospitalized patients at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Robin Patel, Ferric C Fang
Recent advances in microbial diagnostics are providing clinicians with information about microbes causing infections and their resistance to antimicrobial agents more rapidly than ever before. Diagnostic stewardship refers to the appropriate use of laboratory testing to guide patient management, including treatment, in order to optimize clinical outcomes and limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Fulfilling the promise of diagnostic stewardship requires a seamless partnership between clinical laboratories, pharmacists, and infectious diseases clinicians, so that appropriate tests are ordered and diagnostic information is translated into appropriate management in real time...
March 14, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Gregory D Bowden, Kirkwood M Land, Roberta M O'Connor, Heather M Fritz
The apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona is the primary etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a serious neurologic disease of horses. Many horses in the U.S. are at risk of developing EPM; approximately 50% of all horses in the U.S. have been exposed to S. neurona and treatments for EPM are 60-70% effective. Advancement of treatment requires new technology to identify new drugs for EPM. To address this critical need, we developed, validated, and implemented a high-throughput screen to test 725 FDA-approved compounds from the NIH clinical collections library for anti-S...
February 16, 2018: International Journal for Parasitology, Drugs and Drug Resistance
Nicole M Revie, Kali R Iyer, Nicole Robbins, Leah E Cowen
Microorganisms have a remarkable capacity to evolve resistance to antimicrobial agents, threatening the efficacy of the limited arsenal of antimicrobials and becoming a dire public health crisis. This is of particular concern for fungal pathogens, which cause devastating invasive infections with treatment options limited to only three major classes of antifungal drugs. The paucity of antifungals with clinical utility is in part due to close evolutionary relationships between these eukaryotic pathogens and their human hosts, which limits the unique targets to be exploited therapeutically...
March 12, 2018: Current Opinion in Microbiology
Elena Kilian, Jan S Suchodolski, Katrin Hartmann, Ralf S Mueller, Gerhard Wess, Stefan Unterer
BACKGROUND: Canine parvovirus (CPV) is the most important viral cause of acute canine enteritis leading to severe damage of the intestinal barrier. It has been speculated that dogs might develop chronic disorders after surviving CPV infection. However, no studies regarding the long-term implications of CPV infection have been published to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether dogs that have survived CPV infection will have an increased risk for developing chronic gastroenteritis, atopic dermatitis, or cardiac disease...
2018: PloS One
Carolina de la Guardia, David E Stephens, Hang T Dang, Mario Quijada, Oleg V Larionov, Ricardo Lleonart
Dengue virus causes dengue fever, a debilitating disease with an increasing incidence in many tropical and subtropical territories. So far, there are no effective antivirals licensed to treat this virus. Here we describe the synthesis and antiviral activity evaluation of two compounds based on the quinoline scaffold, which has shown potential for the development of molecules with various biological activities. Two of the tested compounds showed dose-dependent inhibition of dengue virus serotype 2 in the low and sub micromolar range...
March 16, 2018: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Ashley Gionfriddo, Mika L Nonoyama, Peter C Laussen, Peter N Cox, Megan Clarke, Alejandro A Floh
OBJECTIVES: To promote standardization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention introduced a new ventilator-associated pneumonia classification, which was modified for pediatrics (pediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia according to proposed criteria [PVAP]). We evaluated the frequency of PVAP in a cohort of children diagnosed with ventilator-associated pneumonia according to traditional criteria and compared their strength of association with clinically relevant outcomes. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study...
March 15, 2018: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Enrico Gugliandolo, Roberta Fusco, Giovanna Ginestra, Ramona D'amico, Carlo Bisignano, Giuseppina Mandalari, Salvatore Cuzzocrea, Rosanna Di Paola
BACKGROUND: Colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), the most common pathogen isolated mainly in patients with cystic fibrosis, is particularly difficult to eradicate and is associated with acceleration of decline in lung function and with poorer prognosis. PA LPS is recognized by toll like receptors 4 (TLR4) and has been shown to induce lung inflammation in vivo. In addition, regulation of this process is essential for proper pathogen clearance and to prevent excessive inflammatory response resulting in tissue damage...
March 15, 2018: Shock
Laura Tarancon-Diez, Rebeca S De Pablo-Bernal, José Luis Jiménez, Ana I Álvarez-Ríos, Miguel Genebat, Isaac Rosado-Sánchez, María-Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Ezequiel Ruiz-Mateos, Manuel Leal
OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the main causes of morbimortality in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The objective of this work was to evaluate the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CVDs occurrence in HIV-infected patients. Additionally, the functional consequences of carrying these SNPs were analyzed. METHODS: The association of TLR4 SNPs, Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile with CVDs occurrence was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models...
March 15, 2018: AIDS
Kiran T Thakur, Alexandra Boubour, Deanna Saylor, Mitashee Das, David R Bearden, Gretchen L Birbeck
: Neurological conditions associated with HIV remain major contributors to morbidity and mortality and are increasingly recognized in the aging population on long-standing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Importantly, growing evidence shows that the CNS may serve as a reservoir for viral replication, which has major implications for HIV eradication strategies. Though there has been major progress in the last decade in our understanding of the pathogenesis, burden, and impact of neurological conditions associated with HIV infection, significant scientific gaps remain...
March 15, 2018: AIDS
Rogério M Pinto, Susan S Witte, Prema L Filippone, C Jean Choi, Melanie Wall
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions project has disseminated HIV behavioral interventions (EBIs) across the United States since the 1990s. In 2011, the CDC launched the High-Impact HIV Prevention (HIP) project, providing EBIs plus high-impact services (HIV testing, primary care, and support services). Providers (nurses, social workers, educators) are unable to consistently make linkages; thus, numerous at-risk individuals are not benefitting from HIP...
March 1, 2018: Health Education & Behavior: the Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education
Rajeev Ranjan, Arra Abhinay, Monalisa Mishra
Neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, etc., are serious life-threatening diseases, which involve degeneration of the neurons with time. Numerous studies have discussed the role of microbes in neurodegeneration. Oral cavity being the primary site of infection acts as a gateway for gigantic population of microbes to the human body. Oral infection is known to be associated with neurodegeneration. The current review summarizes various mechanisms due to which the oral microbiome can cause neurodegeneration...
March 2018: Neurology India
Kerim Sariyilmaz, Ilker Eren, Okan Ozkunt, Mustafa Sungur, Onder I Kilicoglu, Fatih Dikici
BACKGROUND: Gout is a purine metabolism disease. Tophaceous gout may cause joint destruction and other systemic problems and sometimes may be complicated by infection. Infection and sinus with discharge associated with tophaceous gout are serious complications, and treatment is difficult. We present a patient with tophaceous gout complicated by infection and discharging sinus treated by bilateral amputation at the level of the first metatarsus. METHODS: A 43-year-old man previously diagnosed as having gout, and noncompliant with treatment, presented with tophaceous gout associated with discharging sinus and infection on his left first metatarsophalangeal joint...
January 2018: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Antony T Vincent, Steve J Charette, Jean Barbeau
The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is found in several habitats, both natural and human-made, and is particularly known for its recurrent presence as a pathogen in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease. Given its clinical importance, several major studies have investigated the genomic adaptation of P. aeruginosa in lungs and its transition as acute infections become chronic. However, our knowledge about the diversity and adaptation of the P. aeruginosa genome to non-clinical environments is still fragmentary, in part due to the lack of accurate reference genomes of strains from the numerous environments colonized by the bacterium...
March 16, 2018: Genome Génome / Conseil National de Recherches Canada
Charles S Dela Cruz, Richard G Wunderink, David C Christiani, Stephania A Cormier, Kristina Crothers, Claire M Doerschuk, Scott E Evans, Daniel R Goldstein, Purvesh Khatri, Lester Kobzik, Jay K Kolls, Bruce D Levy, Mark L Metersky, Michael S Niederman, Roomi Nusrat, Carlos J Orihuela, Paula Peyrani, Alice S Prince, Julio A Ramírez, Karen M Ridge, Sanjay Sethi, Benjamin T Suratt, Jacob I Sznajder, Ephraim L Tsalik, Allan J Walkey, Sachin Yende, Neil R Aggarwal, Elisabet V Caler, Joseph P Mizgerd
Pneumonia is a complex pulmonary disease in need of new clinical approaches. While triggered by a pathogen, pneumonia often results from dysregulations of host defense that likely precede infection. The coordinated activities of immune resistance and tissue resilience then dictate whether and how pneumonia progresses or resolves. Inadequate or inappropriate host responses lead to more severe outcomes such as ARDS and to organ dysfunction beyond the lungs and overextended time-frames after pathogen clearance, some of which increase the risk for subsequent pneumonias...
March 16, 2018: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Niki Oikonomopoulou, Ana Belén Martínez López, Javier Urbano Villaescusa, María Del Carmen Molina Molina, Laura Butragueño Laiseca, Daniel Barraca Nuñez, Olalla Álvarez Blanco
INTRODUCTION: Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a rare entity in the pediatric age. It is de fined by the infiltration of the renal parenchyma by mononuclear and/or polynuclear cells with se condary involvement of the tubules, without glomerular injury. It can be triggered by infections or immunological diseases, drugs like NSAIDs or be of idiopathic origin. OBJECTIVE: To raise awareness among pediatricians about the prescription of NSAIDs, especially to patients of less than a year old, since they can provoke renal damage...
December 2017: Revista Chilena de Pediatría
Alessandra Maria Mont Alverne Pierre, Ana Cristina de Castro Amaral Feldner, Roberto José de Carvalho Filho, Edmundo Pessoa de Almeida Lopes, Michele Soares Gomes Gouvea, João Renato Rebello Pinho, Claudia Teresa Carvente, Christini Takemi Emori, Genimari Arruda da Silva, Maria Lúcia Cardoso Gomes Ferraz
INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis B virus infection is an important cause of liver disease in hemodialysis patients and renal transplant recipients. Hepatitis Delta virus is a defective virus transmitted by the same route of hepatitis B virus, which requires the helper function of hepatitis B virus. Data about hepatitis B virus/hepatitis delta virus coinfection are scarce and there are no studies regarding the coinfection among hemodialysis patients and renal transplant in our country. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus infection among hemodialysis patients and renal transplant recipients...
March 2018: International Journal of Artificial Organs
Maxim Yu Rykov, Sergei V Zaborovskij, Alexander N Shvecov, Vladimir V Shukin
PURPOSE: To review our experience with peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric cancer patients. METHODS: The analysis included 353 patients (3 months up to 17 years, mean age 11.2 years) with a variety of cancers diseases, which in 2011-2016, 354 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed. All settings are carried out using ultrasound guidance. In 138 (39%) patients, external anatomical landmarks were used and in 216 (61%) intraoperative fluoroscopy...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Ruchita Dixit, Sowmya Nettem, Simerjit S Madan, Htoo Htoo Kyaw Soe, Adinegara Bl Abas, Leah D Vance, Patrick J Stover
BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of disorders that affects haemoglobin, which causes distorted sickle- or crescent-shaped red blood cells. It is characterized by anaemia, increased susceptibility to infections and episodes of pain. The disease is acquired by inheriting abnormal genes from both parents, the combination giving rise to different forms of the disease. Due to increased erythropoiesis in people with SCD, it is hypothesized that they are at an increased risk for folate deficiency...
March 16, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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