keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Immune system

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914202/probiotic-roles-of-lactobacillus-spp-in-swine-insights-from-gut-microbiota
#1
REVIEW
Valerie Diane V Valeriano, Marilen P Balolong, Dae-Kyung Kang
The use of lactobacilli as probiotics in swine has been gaining attention due to their ability to improve growth performance and carcass quality, prevent gastrointestinal infection, and most importantly, their 'generally recognised as safe' status. Previous studies support the potential of lactobacilli to regulate host immune systems, enhance gut metabolic capacities, and maintain balance in the gut microbiota. Research on swine gut microbiota has revealed complex gut microbial community structure and showed the importance of Lactobacillus to the host's health...
December 3, 2016: Journal of Applied Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914090/measuring-antibody-orientation-at-the-bacterial-surface
#2
Oonagh Shannon, Pontus Nordenfelt
Many bacteria have the ability to interact with antibodies as a means to circumvent the immune response. This includes binding to the Fc portion of antibodies, effectively reversing the antibody orientation and thus decreasing the Fc-mediated immune signaling. Since antibody orientation at the bacterial surface has been shown to be important in human disease, it is valuable to be able to assess how antibodies are interacting with bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe a method to measure the proportion of human IgG that are bound via their Fc or Fabs to a bacterial surface...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914086/killing-bacteria-with-cytotoxic-effector-proteins-of-human-killer-immune-cells-granzymes-granulysin-and-perforin
#3
Diego López León, Isabelle Fellay, Pierre-Yves Mantel, Michael Walch
Bacterial pathogens represent a constant threat to human health that was exacerbated in recent years by a dramatic increase of strains resistant to last resort antibiotics. The immune system of higher vertebrates generally evolved several efficient innate and adaptive mechanisms to fight ubiquitous bacterial pathogens. Among those mechanisms, immune proteases were recognized to contribute essentially to antibacterial immune defense. The effector serine proteases of the adaptive immune system, the granzymes, exert potent antimicrobial activity when they are delivered into the bacterial cytosol by prokaryotic membrane disrupting proteins, such as granulysin...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914084/the-zebrafish-as-a-model-for-human-bacterial-infections
#4
Melody N Neely
The development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) infectious disease model has provided new insights and information into pathogenesis. Many of these new discoveries would not have been possible using a typical mammalian model. The advantages of using this model are many and in the last 15 years the model has been exploited for the analysis of many different pathogens. Here, we describe in detail how to perform a bacterial infection using either the adult zebrafish or zebrafish larvae using microinjection. Multiple methods of analysis are described that can be used to address specific questions pertaining to disease progression and the interactions with the immune system...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914063/episweep-computationally-driven-reengineering-of-therapeutic-proteins-to-reduce-immunogenicity-while-maintaining-function
#5
Yoonjoo Choi, Deeptak Verma, Karl E Griswold, Chris Bailey-Kellogg
Therapeutic proteins are yielding ever more advanced and efficacious new drugs, but the biological origins of these highly effective therapeutics render them subject to immune surveillance within the patient's body. When recognized by the immune system as a foreign agent, protein drugs elicit a coordinated response that can manifest a range of clinical complications including rapid drug clearance, loss of functionality and efficacy, delayed infusion-like allergic reactions, more serious anaphylactic shock, and even induced auto-immunity...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914061/probing-oligomerized-conformations-of-defensin-in-the-membrane
#6
Wenxun Gan, Dina Schneidman, Ning Zhang, Buyong Ma, Ruth Nussinov
Computational prediction and design of membrane protein-protein interactions facilitate biomedical engineering and biotechnological applications. Due to their antimicrobial activity, human defensins play an important role in the innate immune system. Human defensins are attractive pharmaceutical targets due to their small size, broad activity spectrum, reduced immunogenicity, and resistance to proteolysis. Protein engineering based modification of defensins can improve their pharmaceutical properties. Here we present an approach to computationally probe defensins' oligomerization states in the membrane...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913998/immunotherapy-for-breast-cancer-past-present-and-future
#7
Alison Spellman, Shou-Ching Tang
Immunotherapy has shown promise in many solid tumors including melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer with an evolving role in breast cancer. Immunotherapy encompasses a wide range of therapies including immune checkpoint inhibition, monoclonal antibodies, bispecific antibodies, vaccinations, antibody-drug conjugates, and identifying other emerging interventions targeting the tumor microenvironment. Increasing efficacy of these treatments in breast cancer patients requires identification of better biomarkers to guide patient selection; recognizing when to initiate these therapies in multi-modality treatment plans; establishing novel assays to monitor immune-mediated responses; and creating combined systemic therapy options incorporating conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and endocrine therapy...
December 2, 2016: Cancer Metastasis Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913990/sirukumab-a-potential-treatment-for-mood-disorders
#8
REVIEW
Aileen J Zhou, Yena Lee, Giacomo Salvadore, Benjamin Hsu, Trehani M Fonseka, Sidney H Kennedy, Roger S McIntyre
Convergent evidence indicates that abnormalities in the innate immune system may be pertinent to the pathogenesis, phenomenology, and possible treatment of several mental disorders. In keeping with this view, the targeting of interleukin-6 with the human monoclonal antibody sirukumab may represent a possible treatment and disease modification approach, for adults with brain-based disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder). A PubMed/Medline database search was performed using the following search terms: sirukumab; anti-IL-6; IL-6; major depressive disorder; inflammation...
December 2, 2016: Advances in Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913847/patulin-transformation-products-and-last-intermediates-in-its-biosynthetic-pathway-e-and-z-ascladiol-are-not-toxic-to-human-cells
#9
Joanna Tannous, Selma P Snini, Rhoda El Khoury, Cécile Canlet, Philippe Pinton, Yannick Lippi, Imourana Alassane-Kpembi, Thierry Gauthier, André El Khoury, Ali Atoui, Ting Zhou, Roger Lteif, Isabelle P Oswald, Olivier Puel
Patulin is the main mycotoxin contaminating apples. During the brewing of alcoholic beverages, this mycotoxin is degraded to ascladiol, which is also the last precursor of patulin. The present study aims (1) to characterize the last step of the patulin biosynthetic pathway and (2) to describe the toxicity of ascladiol. A patE deletion mutant was generated in Penicillium expansum. In contrast to the wild strain, this mutant does not produce patulin but accumulates high levels of E-ascladiol with few traces of Z-ascladiol...
December 2, 2016: Archives of Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913835/preventive-dna-vaccination-against-cea-expressing-tumors-with-anti-idiotypic-scfv6-c4-dna-in-cea-expressing-transgenic-mice
#10
Priscila M A Denapoli, Bianca F Zanetti, Adara A Dos Santos, Jane Z de Moraes, Sang W Han
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed during embryonic life and in low level during adult life. Consequently, the CEA is recognized by the immune system as a self-antigen and thus CEA-expressing tumors are tolerated. Previously, we constructed a single chain variable fragment using the 6.C4 (scFv6.C4) hybridoma cell line, which gave rise to antibodies able to recognize CEA when C57/Bl6 mice were immunized. Here, the scFv6.C4 ability to prevent the CEA-expressing tumor growth was assessed in CEA-expressing transgenic mice CEA2682...
December 2, 2016: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy: CII
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913750/congenital-heart-block-and-immune-mediated-sensorineural-hearing-loss-possible-cross-reactivity-of-immune-response
#11
C Bason, I Pagnini, A Brucato, S Maestroni, A Puccetti, C Lunardi, R Cimaz
Immune-mediated sensorineural hearing loss may complicate systemic autoimmune diseases. We have previously reported the presence of antibodies directed against inner ear antigens in patients with Cogan syndrome, a disease characterized by sudden hearing loss and interstitial keratitis. Such autoantibodies cross-react with an epitope of SSA/Ro60 protein. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in pregnant women cross the placenta and reach the fetal tissues inducing an immune-mediated damage of the cardiac conduction system...
December 2, 2016: Lupus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913643/biogenesis-and-transcriptional-regulation-of-long-noncoding-rnas-in-the-human-immune-system
#12
REVIEW
Charles F Spurlock, Philip S Crooke, Thomas M Aune
The central dogma of molecular biology states that DNA makes RNA makes protein. Discoveries over the last quarter of a century found that the process of DNA transcription into RNA gives rise to a diverse array of functional RNA species, including genes that code for protein and noncoding RNAs. For decades, the focus has been on understanding how protein-coding genes are regulated to influence protein expression. However, with the completion of the Human Genome Project and follow-up ENCODE data, it is now appreciated that only 2-3% of the genome codes for protein-coding gene exons and that the bulk of the transcribed genome, apart from ribosomal RNAs, is at the level of noncoding RNA genes...
December 15, 2016: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913530/cytokine-release-syndrome-with-novel-therapeutics-for-acute-lymphoblastic-leukemia
#13
Noelle V Frey, David L Porter
T-cell-engaging immunotherapies are exciting new approaches to treat patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). These unique agents, which include blinatumomab, a CD3/CD19 bispecific antibody, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells targeted to CD19 have shown unprecedented remission rates in the relapsed, refractory ALL setting. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), resulting from the high magnitude of immune activation by these therapies, is the most significant treatment-related toxicity. CRS manifests with fever and malaise and can progress to life-threatening capillary leak with hypoxia and hypotension...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913525/checkpoint-inhibition-in-myeloma
#14
Don M Benson
Historically, attempts at cancer immunotherapy have emphasized strategies designed to stimulate or augment the immune system into action. In the past decade, a complementary approach has developed, that of releasing immune cells from inhibitory restraint. Discoveries in the fundamental biology of how immunity is regulated, how the immune system interfaces with malignancy, and how cancer cells may exploit these processes to evade detection have all been translated into the rapidly growing field of therapeutic immune checkpoint inhibition for cancer...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913515/cellular-immune-responses-in-red-blood-cell-alloimmunization
#15
James C Zimring, Krystalyn E Hudson
In excess of 340 blood group antigens have now been described that vary between individuals. Thus, any unit of blood that is nonautologous represents a significant dose of alloantigen. Most blood group antigens are proteins, which differ by a single amino acid between donors and recipients. Approximately 1 out of every 70 individuals are transfused each year (in the United States alone), which leads to antibody responses to red blood cell (RBC) alloantigens in some transfusion recipients. When alloantibodies are formed, in many cases, RBCs expressing the antigen in question can no longer be safely transfused...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913502/mrd-in-aml-does-it-already-guide-therapy-decision-making
#16
Gert Ossenkoppele, Gerrit Jan Schuurhuis
Prognostic factors determined at diagnosis are predictive for outcome whereas achievement of morphological complete remission (CR) is still an important end point during treatment. Residual disease after therapy may reflect the sum of all diagnosis and postdiagnosis resistance mechanisms/factors; its measurement could hypothetically be very instrumental for guiding treatment. The possibility of defining residual disease (minimal residual disease [MRD]) far below the level of 5% blast cells is changing the landscape of risk classification...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913493/novel-agents-in-follicular-lymphoma-choosing-the-best-target
#17
Laurie H Sehn
Outcomes in patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) have improved dramatically over the last decade. However, novel agents are greatly needed for those who exhibit treatment resistance, in order to minimize lifelong toxicity and to enable combinations that may allow us to achieve the elusive goal of cure. Biological advances have led to the discovery of a large number of potential therapeutic targets and the development of a plethora of novel agents designed to exploit these processes. Possible targets include tumor cell surface markers, key components of intracellular pathways and epigenetic mechanisms, and reactive cells of the microenvironment...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913489/platelets-in-infectious-disease
#18
Elizabeth Middleton, Matthew T Rondina
Sepsis is a dynamic, acute, infectious disease syndrome characterized by dysregulated thrombo-inflammatory responses. The high mortality associated with sepsis has been recognized since the earliest clinicians' writings. Despite this, advances in the treatment of sepsis have been more modest. This is limited, in part, by the heterogeneity in the definition, population, presentation, and causal factors of infectious syndromes. Given the persistently high morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis, a better understanding of the dysregulated cellular biology underpinning sepsis is needed...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913418/a-novel-rhamnose-rich-hetero-exopolysaccharide-isolated-from-lactobacillus-paracasei-dg-activates-thp-1-human-monocytic-cells
#19
Silvia Balzaretti, Valentina Taverniti, Simone Guglielmetti, Walter Fiore, Mario Minuzzo, Hansel N Ngo, Judith B Ngere, Sohaib Sadiq, Paul N Humphreys, Andrew P Laws
: Lactobacillus paracasei DG is a bacterial strain with recognized probiotic properties and is used in commercial probiotic products. However, the mechanisms underlying its probiotic properties are mainly unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the capability of strain DG to interact with the host is, at least partly, associated with its ability to synthesize a surface-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS). Comparative genomics revealed the presence of putative EPS gene clusters in DG genome; accordingly, EPS was isolated from the surface of the bacterium...
December 2, 2016: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913304/effects-of-nongenetic-factors-on-immune-cell-dynamics-in-early-childhood-the-generation-r-study
#20
Diana van den Heuvel, Michelle A E Jansen, Kazem Nasserinejad, Willem A Dik, Ellen G van Lochem, Liesbeth E Bakker-Jonges, Halima Bouallouch-Charif, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Herbert Hooijkaas, Jacques J M van Dongen, Henriëtte A Moll, Menno C van Zelm
BACKGROUND: . Numbers of blood leukocyte subsets are highly dynamic in childhood and differ greatly between individuals. Inter-individual variation is only partly accounted for by genetic factors. OBJECTIVE: Determine which nongenetic factors affect the dynamics of innate leukocytes, and naive and memory lymphocyte subsets. METHODS: . We performed six-color flow cytometry and linear mixed effect modeling to define the dynamics of 62 leukocyte subsets from birth to 6 years of age in 1,182 children with one to five measurements per individual...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
keyword
keyword
1502
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"