keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Synaptic plasticity

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938532/modulation-of-gdf11-expression-and-synaptic-plasticity-by-age-and-training
#1
Emanuela De Domenico, Giovanna D'Arcangelo, Isabella Faraoni, Mattia Palmieri, Virginia Tancredi, Grazia Graziani, Paola Grimaldi, Lucio Tentori
The Growth Differentiation Factor 11 (GDF11) has been controversially involved in the aging/rejuvenation process. To clarify whether GDF11 is differently expressed during aging, we have evaluated GDF11 levels in skeletal muscles and hippocampi of young and old mice, sedentary or subjected to a 12-weeks triweekly training protocol. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot analyses indicate that skeletal muscles of sedentary old mice express higher levels of GDF11 compared to young animals (p < 0.05)...
August 29, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938084/the-evolving-understanding-of-dopamine-neurons-in-the-substantia-nigra-and-ventral-tegmental-area
#2
Stephanie C Gantz, Christopher P Ford, Hitoshi Morikawa, John T Williams
In recent years, the population of neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) has been examined at multiple levels. The results indicate that the projections, neurochemistry, and receptor and ion channel expression in this cell population vary widely. This review centers on the intrinsic properties and synaptic regulation that control the activity of dopamine neurons. Although all dopamine neurons fire action potentials in a pacemaker pattern in the absence of synaptic input, the intrinsic properties that underlie this activity differ considerably...
September 22, 2017: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28937977/phase-changes-in-neuronal-postsynaptic-spiking-due-to-short-term-plasticity
#3
Mark D McDonnell, Bruce P Graham
In the brain, the postsynaptic response of a neuron to time-varying inputs is determined by the interaction of presynaptic spike times with the short-term dynamics of each synapse. For a neuron driven by stochastic synapses, synaptic depression results in a quite different postsynaptic response to a large population input depending on how correlated in time the spikes across individual synapses are. Here we show using both simulations and mathematical analysis that not only the rate but the phase of the postsynaptic response to a rhythmic population input varies as a function of synaptic dynamics and synaptic configuration...
September 22, 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935880/the-role-of-glutamate-transporters-in-the-pathophysiology-of-neuropsychiatric-disorders
#4
REVIEW
Sinead M O'Donovan, Courtney R Sullivan, Robert E McCullumsmith
Altered glutamate transporter expression is a common feature of many neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are responsible for the reuptake of glutamate, preventing non-physiological spillover from the synapse. Postmortem studies have revealed significant dysregulation of EAAT expression in various brain regions at the cellular and subcellular level. Recent animal studies have also demonstrated a role for glutamate spillover as a mechanism of disease...
September 21, 2017: NPJ Schizophrenia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935587/glutamatergic-synapses-in-neurodevelopmental-disorders
#5
REVIEW
Edoardo Moretto, Luca Murru, Giuseppe Martano, Jenny Sassone, Maria Passafaro
Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are a group of diseases whose symptoms arise during childhood or adolescence and that impact several higher cognitive functions such as learning, sociability and mood. Accruing evidence suggests that a shared pathogenic mechanism underlying these diseases is the dysfunction of glutamatergic synapses. We summarize present knowledge on autism spectrum disorders (ASD), intellectual disability (ID), Down syndrome (DS), Rett syndrome (RS) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), highlighting the involvement of glutamatergic synapses and receptors in these disorders...
September 18, 2017: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934222/endogenous-rgs14-is-a-cytoplasmic-nuclear-shuttling-protein-that-localizes-to-juxtanuclear-membranes-and-chromatin-rich-regions-of-the-nucleus
#6
Mary Rose Branch, John R Hepler
Regulator of G protein signaling 14 (RGS14) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that integrates G protein and H-Ras/MAPkinase signaling pathways to regulate synaptic plasticity important for hippocampal learning and memory. However, to date, little is known about the subcellular distribution and roles of endogenous RGS14 in a neuronal cell line. Most of what is known about RGS14 cellular behavior is based on studies of tagged, recombinant RGS14 ectopically overexpressed in unnatural host cells. Here, we report for the first time a comprehensive assessment of the subcellular distribution and dynamic localization of endogenous RGS14 in rat B35 neuroblastoma cells...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934194/arginine-vasopressin-ameliorates-spatial-learning-impairments-in-chronic-cerebral-hypoperfusion-via-v1a-receptor-and-autophagy-signaling-partially
#7
C Yang, X Zhang, J Gao, M Wang, Z Yang
Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is a major factor contributing to neurological disorders and cognitive decline. Autophagy activation is believed to provide both beneficial and detrimental roles during hypoxic/ischemic cellular injury. Although arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been strongly involved in many behaviors, especially in learning and memory, the effects of AVP on CCH and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, to investigate whether there was neuroprotective effects of AVP on CCH through V1a receptor (an AVP receptor) signaling, permanent bilateral carotid arteries occlusion (two vessel occlusion, 2VO) was used to establish a rat model of CCH, and hypertonic saline (5...
July 18, 2017: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28933062/hypothalamic-dysfunction-in-obesity-and-metabolic-disorders
#8
Sara Carmo-Silva, Cláudia Cavadas
The hypothalamus is the brain region responsible for the maintenance of energetic homeostasis. The regulation of this process arises from the ability of the hypothalamus to orchestrate complex physiological responses such as food intake and energy expenditure, circadian rhythm, stress response, and fertility. Metabolic alterations such as obesity can compromise these hypothalamic regulatory functions. Alterations in circadian rhythm, stress response, and fertility further contribute to aggravate the metabolic dysfunction of obesity and contribute to the development of chronic disorders such as depression and infertility...
2017: Advances in Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932899/voluntary-running-enhanced-synaptic-plasticity-learning-and-memory-are-mediated-by-notch1-signal-pathway-in-c57bl-mice
#9
Xiaochen Zhang, Chunxiao Yang, Jing Gao, Hongqiang Yin, Hui Zhang, Tao Zhang, Zhuo Yang
It is well known that voluntary running can enhance synaptic plasticity and improve learning and memory abilities. The Notch1 receptor is also reported to be associated with these processes, but its role in running-induced alterations is unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the Notch1 signalling pathway was involved in voluntary running-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Notch1 heterozygous deficient (Notch1(+/-)) mice and wildtype (WT) C57BL littermates were randomly divided into runner group and non-runner group...
September 20, 2017: Brain Structure & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932187/linking-network-activity-to-synaptic-plasticity-during-sleep-hypotheses-and-recent-data
#10
REVIEW
Carlos Puentes-Mestril, Sara J Aton
Research findings over the past two decades have supported a link between sleep states and synaptic plasticity. Numerous mechanistic hypotheses have been put forth to explain this relationship. For example, multiple studies have shown structural alterations to synapses (including changes in synaptic volume, spine density, and receptor composition) indicative of synaptic weakening after a period of sleep. Direct measures of neuronal activity and synaptic strength support the idea that a period of sleep can reduce synaptic strength...
2017: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28931983/postactivation-depression-of-soleus-h-reflex-increase-with-recovery-of-lower-extremities-motor-functions-in-patients-with-subacute-stroke
#11
Yu Kawaishi, Naoki Matsumoto, Toshiya Nishiwaki, Tatsuro Hirano
[Purpose] The soleus H-reflex is depressed at stimulation rates greater than 0.1 Hz. This reflex depression is referred to as postactivation depression. Postactivation depression reflects the reduced efficacy of the Ia-motoneurons synapses when they are evaluated after a previous activation. The aim of this study was to determine whether the recovery of motor functions in the lower extremities affects the PAD of the soleus H-reflex in patients with subacute stroke undergoing rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] Eight patients with subacute stroke patients were recruited...
September 2017: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28931433/role-of-gabaa-receptors-in-alcohol-use-disorders-suggested-by-chronic-intermittent-ethanol-cie-rodent-model
#12
REVIEW
Richard W Olsen, Jing Liang
GABAergic inhibitory transmission is involved in the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the brain and behavior. One-dose ethanol exposure induces transient plastic changes in GABAA receptor subunit levels, composition, and regional and subcellular localization. Rapid down-regulation of early responder δ subunit-containing GABAA receptor subtypes mediating ethanol-sensitive tonic inhibitory currents in critical neuronal circuits corresponds to rapid tolerance to ethanol's behavioral responses. Slightly slower, α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptor subtypes mediating ethanol-insensitive synaptic inhibition are down-regulated, corresponding to tolerance to additional ethanol behaviors plus cross-tolerance to other GABAergic drugs including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and neurosteroids, especially sedative-hypnotic effects...
September 20, 2017: Molecular Brain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28929331/glutamatergic-regulation-of-hypothalamic-presympathetic-neurons-in-hypertension
#13
De-Pei Li, Hui-Lin Pan
Elevated sympathetic vasomotor tone emanating from the brain is a major mechanism involved in the development of hypertension. Increased glutamatergic excitatory input to presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus leads to increased sympathetic outflow in various animal models of hypertension. Recent studies have revealed molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying enhanced glutamatergic synaptic input to PVN presympathetic neurons in hypertension. In this review article, we summarize recent findings on changes in inotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites, responsible for increased glutamatergic input to PVN presympathetic neurons in hypertension...
September 19, 2017: Current Hypertension Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28928394/rna-localization-is-a-key-determinant-of-neurite-enriched-proteome
#14
Alessandra Zappulo, David van den Bruck, Camilla Ciolli Mattioli, Vedran Franke, Koshi Imami, Erik McShane, Mireia Moreno-Estelles, Lorenzo Calviello, Andrei Filipchyk, Esteban Peguero-Sanchez, Thomas Müller, Andrew Woehler, Carmen Birchmeier, Enrique Merino, Nikolaus Rajewsky, Uwe Ohler, Esteban O Mazzoni, Matthias Selbach, Altuna Akalin, Marina Chekulaeva
Protein subcellular localization is fundamental to the establishment of the body axis, cell migration, synaptic plasticity, and a vast range of other biological processes. Protein localization occurs through three mechanisms: protein transport, mRNA localization, and local translation. However, the relative contribution of each process to neuronal polarity remains unknown. Using neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells, we analyze protein and RNA expression and translation rates in isolated cell bodies and neurites genome-wide...
September 19, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28927503/learning-induces-the-translin-trax-rnase-complex-to-express-activin-receptors-for-persistent-memory
#15
Alan Jung Park, Robbert Havekes, Xiuping Fu, Rolf Hansen, Jennifer C Tudor, Lucia Peixoto, Zhi Li, Yen-Ching Wu, Shane G Poplawski, Jay M Baraban, Ted Abel
Long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory require de novo protein synthesis. Yet, how learning triggers this process to form memory is unclear. Translin/trax is a candidate to drive this learning-induced memory mechanism by suppressing microRNA-mediated translational silencing at activated synapses. We find that mice lacking translin/trax display defects in synaptic tagging, which requires protein synthesis at activated synapses, and long-term memory. Hippocampal samples harvested from these mice following learning show increases in several disease-related microRNAs targeting the activin A receptor type 1C (ACVR1C), a component of the transforming growth factor-β receptor superfamily...
September 20, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926184/experience-dependent-neural-plasticity-learning-and-memory-in-the-era-of%C3%A2-epitranscriptomics
#16
REVIEW
Laura J Leighton, Ke Ke, Esmi L Zajaczkowski, Jordan Edmunds, Robert C Spitale, Timothy W Bredy
In this short review, we highlight recent findings in the emerging field of epitranscriptomic mechanisms and discuss their potential role in neural plasticity, learning and memory. These include the influence of RNA modifications on activity-induced RNA structure states, RNA editing and RNA localization, and how qualitative state changes in RNA increase the functional diversity and information-carrying capacity of RNA molecules. We predict that RNA modifications may be just as important for synaptic plasticity and memory as quantitative changes in transcript and protein abundance, but with the added advantage of not being required to signal back to the nucleus, and therefore better suited to be coordinated with the temporal dynamics of learning...
September 19, 2017: Genes, Brain, and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926076/electronic-imitation-of-behavioral-and-psychological-synaptic-activities-using-tiox-al2o3-based-memristor-devices
#17
Writam Banerjee, Qi Liu, Hangbing Lv, Shibing Long, Ming Liu
Seeking an effective electronic synapse to emulate biological synaptic behavior is fundamental for building brain-inspired computers. An emerging two-terminal memristor, in which the conductance can be gradually modulated by external electrical stimuli, is widely considered as the strongest competitor of the electronic synapse. Here, we show the capability of TiOx/Al2O3-based memristor devices to imitate synaptic behaviors. Along with analog resistive switching performances, the devices replicate the bio-synapse behaviors of potentiation/depression, short-term-plasticity, and long-term-potentiation, which show that TiOx/Al2O3-based memristors may be useful as electronic synapses...
September 19, 2017: Nanoscale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28924170/the-tyrosine-phosphatase-ptpn13-fap-1-links-calpain-2-tbi-and-tau-tyrosine-phosphorylation
#18
Yubin Wang, Randy A Hall, Moses Lee, Andysheh Kamgar-Parsi, Xiaoning Bi, Michel Baudry
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Calpain activation and tau hyperphosphorylation have been implicated in both TBI and AD. However, the link between calpain and tau phosphorylation has not been fully identified. We recently discovered that the two major calpain isoforms in the brain, calpain-1 and calpain-2, play opposite functions in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival/death, which may be related to their different C-terminal PDZ binding motifs. Here, we identify the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13 as a key PDZ binding partner of calpain-2...
September 18, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28924012/inhibition-of-il-1%C3%AE-signaling-normalizes-nmda-dependent-neurotransmission-and-reduces-seizure-susceptibility-in-a-mouse-model-of-creutzfeldt-jakob-disease
#19
Ilaria Bertani, Valentina Iori, Massimo Trusel, Mattia Maroso, Claudia Foray, Susanna Mantovani, Raffaella Tonini, Annamaria Vezzani, Roberto Chiesa
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by prion protein (PrP) misfolding, clinically recognized by cognitive and motor deficits, electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities and seizures. Its neurophysiological bases are not known. To assess the potential involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction, we analyzed NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices from Tg(CJD) mice, which model a genetic form of CJD. Because PrP depletion may result in functional upregulation of NMDARs, we also analyzed PrP knockout (KO) mice...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922504/selective-remodeling-of-glutamatergic-transmission-to-striatal-cholinergic-interneurons-after-dopamine-depletion
#20
Jose de Jesus Aceves Buendia, Lior Tiroshi, Wei-Hua Chiu, Joshua A Goldberg
The widely-held view that the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease arises from an under-activation of the direct pathway striatal spiny neurons (dSPNs) has gained support from a recently described weakening of the glutamatergic projection from the parafascicular nucleus (PfN) to dSPNs in experimental parkinsonism. However, the impact of the remodeling of the thalamostriatal projection cannot be fully appreciated without considering its impact on cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) that themselves preferentially activate indirect pathway spiny neurons (iSPNs)...
September 18, 2017: European Journal of Neuroscience
keyword
keyword
1492
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"