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Brain AND Development

Ayse Sakalli Kani, Ann K Shinn, Kathryn E Lewandowski, Dost Öngür
OBJECTIVES: A variety of treatment options exist for schizophrenia, but the effects of these treatments on brain function are not clearly understood. To facilitate the development of more effective treatment strategies, it is important to identify how brain function in schizophrenia patients is affected by the diverse therapeutic approaches that are currently available. The aim of the present article is to systematically review the evidence for functional brain changes associated with different treatment modalities for schizophrenia...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Hadis Biglari, Reza Sameni
Fetal motility is a widely accepted indicator of the well-being of a fetus. In previous research, it has be shown that fetal motion (FM) is coherent with fetal heart rate accelerations and an indicator for active/rest cycles of the fetus. The most common approach for FM and fetal heart rate (FHR) assessment is by Doppler ultrasound (DUS). While DUS is the most common approach for studying the mechanical activities of the heart, noninvasive fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG) recording and processing techniques have been considered as a possible competitor (or complement) for the DUS...
October 24, 2016: Physiological Measurement
Chao-Ying Chen, Tonya L Rich, Jessica M Cassidy, Bernadette T Gillick
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used as an assessment or intervention to evaluate or influence brain activity in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) commonly caused by perinatal stroke. This communication report analyzed data from two clinical trials using TMS to assess corticospinal excitability in children and young adults with hemiparetic CP. The results of this communication revealed a higher probability of finding a motor evoked potential (MEP) on the non-lesioned hemisphere compared to the lesioned hemisphere (p = 0...
October 20, 2016: Brain Sciences
Jerome A Staal, Yanxin Pei, Brian R Rood
Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease...
October 19, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Rahul A Bharadwaj, Andrew E Jaffe, Qiang Chen, Amy Deep-Soboslay, Aaron L Goldman, Michelle I Mighdoll, John A Cotoia, Anna C Brandtjen, JooHeon Shin, Thomas M Hyde, Venkata S Mattay, Daniel R Weinberger, Joel E Kleinman
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) follows exposure to a traumatic event in susceptible individuals. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic sequence variants that are associated with the risk of developing PTSD. To follow up on identifying the molecular mechanisms of these risk variants, we performed genotype to RNA sequencing-derived quantitative expression (whole gene, exon, and exon junction levels) analysis in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of normal postmortem human brains...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Le-Le Yang, Na Xiao, Xiao-Wei Li, Yong Fan, Raphael N Alolga, Xiao-Yue Sun, Shi-Lei Wang, Ping Li, Lian-Wen Qi
Quercetin is a natural flavonoid widely distributed in human diet and functional foods. Quercetin 3-O-β-glucuronide (Q3G) is present in wine and some medicinal plants. Quercetin and Q3G may be metabolized from each other in vivo. While quercetin has been the subject of many studies, the pharmacokinetic profiles of quercetin and Q3G (in animals) have not yet been compared. Herein, we prepared a column-based method for rapid isolation of Q3G from Nelumbo nucifera. Then, we developed an UHPLC-MS/MS method to compare the pharmacokinetics of quercetin and Q3G...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Wenshu Luo, Hidenobu Mizuno, Ryohei Iwata, Shingo Nakazawa, Kosuke Yasuda, Shigeyoshi Itohara, Takuji Iwasato
Here we describe "Supernova" series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Himanshi Kapoor, Nalini Yadav, Madhu Chopra, Sushil Chandra Mahapatra, Veena Agrawal
Glioblastoma has been reckoned as the prime cause of death due to brain tumours, being most invasive and lethal. Available treatment options, i.e. surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapies are not effective in improving prognosis, so an alternate therapy is insistent. Plant based drugs are efficient due to their synergistic action, multi-targeted approach and least side effects. Present investigation reports the strong anti-tumorous potential of Nardostachys jatamansi rhizome extract (NJRE) on U87 MG glioblastoma cells...
October 19, 2016: Current Cancer Drug Targets
Susanna Nuvoli, Angela Spanu, Giuseppe Madeddu
As well known, the increase in life expectancy and the better physical condition of people in western countries will lead in the next 20 years to a dramatic development of neurodegenerative diseases, especially of dementia that could be considered one of the most important problems in clinical, social and economic fields for the future. Therefore, the differential diagnosis of the various types of dementia is a critical step for patients, clinicians and researchers since an accurate "in vivo" diagnosis can lead to a better patients management...
October 19, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Gavino Faa, Mirko Manchia, Roberta Pintus, Clara Gerosa, Maria Antonietta Marcialis, Vassilios Fanos
Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia...
October 24, 2016: Birth Defects Research. Part C, Embryo Today: Reviews
Francisco Jesús Martinez-Murcia, Meng-Chuan Lai, Juan Manuel Górriz, Javier Ramírez, Adam M H Young, Sean C L Deoni, Christine Ecker, Michael V Lombardo, Simon Baron-Cohen, Declan G M Murphy, Edward T Bullmore, John Suckling
Neuroimaging studies have reported structural and physiological differences that could help understand the causes and development of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Many of them rely on multisite designs, with the recruitment of larger samples increasing statistical power. However, recent large-scale studies have put some findings into question, considering the results to be strongly dependent on the database used, and demonstrating the substantial heterogeneity within this clinically defined category. One major source of variance may be the acquisition of the data in multiple centres...
October 24, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
Ma Ke, Xi Chen, Jia-Cheng Chen, Ying Wang, Xi-Meng Zhang, Fan Huang, Jun-Jiong Zheng, Xiong Chen, Wei Yu, Ke-Ling Cheng, Yan-Qing Feng, Huai-Yu Gu
Rifampicin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic, has neuroprotective, immunosuppressive, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of rifampicin on autoimmune disorders of the nervous system is not clear. In this study, we investigated whether rifampicin was beneficial for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG33-35 )-induced female C57BL/6 experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, the well-established animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Rifampicin treatment (daily from the first day after EAE immunization) remarkably attenuated clinical signs and loss of body weight, which are associated with suppression of inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in spinal cords of EAE mice...
October 23, 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
Lulu Xie, Hongyi Kang, Maiken Nedergaard
BACKGROUND: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. As a consequence, several excellent rodent models have been developed to gain insight into the pathophysiology of stroke and testing the efficacy of neuroprotective interventions. However, one potential problem is that albeit roughly 80% of strokes occur in awake patients, all existing murine stroke models employ anesthesia. Moreover, epidemiological studies have shown that stroke injury is more severe in the minority of patients that suffer stroke while asleep...
2016: Journal of Nature and Science
Chieh-Hsin Wu, Tai-Hsin Tsai, Yu-Feng Su, Zi-Hao Zhang, Wei Liu, Ming-Kung Wu, Chih-Hui Chang, Keng-Liang Kuo, Ying-Yi Lu, Chih-Lung Lin
Whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) is causally related to substance related disorder (SRD) is still debatable, especially in persons with no history of mental disorders at the time of injury. This study analyzed data in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for 19,109 patients aged ≥18 years who had been diagnosed with TBI during 2000-2010. An additional 19,109 randomly selected age and gender matched patients without TBI (1 : 1 ratio) were enrolled in the control group. The relationship between TBI and SRD was estimated with Cox proportional hazard regression models...
2016: Neural Plasticity
Li Zhou, Ping Chen, Yating Peng, Ruoyun Ouyang
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentations. Neurocognitive dysfunction, a significant and extraordinary complication of OSAS, influences patients' career, family, and social life and reduces quality of life to some extent. Previous researches revealed that repetitive hypoxia and reoxygenation caused mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction, overactivated NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and uncoupling nitric oxide synthase, induced an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, and then got rise to a series of oxidative stress (OS) responses, such as protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation along with inflammatory reaction...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Sravya Atluri, Matthew Frehlich, Ye Mei, Luis Garcia Dominguez, Nigel C Rogasch, Willy Wong, Zafiris J Daskalakis, Faranak Farzan
Concurrent recording of electroencephalography (EEG) during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an emerging and powerful tool for studying brain health and function. Despite a growing interest in adaptation of TMS-EEG across neuroscience disciplines, its widespread utility is limited by signal processing challenges. These challenges arise due to the nature of TMS and the sensitivity of EEG to artifacts that often mask TMS-evoked potentials (TEP)s. With an increase in the complexity of data processing methods and a growing interest in multi-site data integration, analysis of TMS-EEG data requires the development of a standardized method to recover TEPs from various sources of artifacts...
2016: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Apurva Kulkarni, Priya Ganesan, Lauren A O'Donnell
Interferon-gamma (IFNγ), a pleiotropic cytokine, is expressed in diverse neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. Its protective mechanisms are well documented during viral infections in the brain, where IFNγ mediates non-cytolytic viral control in infected neurons. However, IFNγ also plays both protective and pathological roles in other central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Of the many neural cells that respond to IFNγ, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the only pluripotent cells in the developing and adult brain, are often altered during CNS insults...
2016: Clinical Medicine Insights. Pathology
Jean-Pierre Routy, Bertrand Routy, Gina M Graziani, Vikram Mehraj
The term "immune privilege" was originally coined to describe the suppression of inflammatory responses within organs protected by anatomic barriers, ie, the eyes, brain, placenta, and testes. However, cellular and metabolic processes, which orchestrate immune responses, also control inflammation within these sites. Our current understanding of tolerogenic mechanisms has extended the definition of immune privilege to include hair follicles, the colon, and cancer. By catabolizing tryptophan, cells expressing the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase produce kynurenine metabolites, which orchestrate local and systemic responses to control inflammation, thus maintaining immune privilege...
2016: International Journal of Tryptophan Research: IJTR
Haruki Tokida, Yuhei Kanaya, Yutaka Shimoe, Shigeru Yamori, Koichi Tagawa, Masaru Kuriyama
We report a case of a 55-year-old man who developed acute-onset narrowing of his visual field. He showed right homonymous hemianopsia without any other neurological symptoms and signs. Brain CT and MRI showed localized hemorrhage (about 1.6 ml) in the left lateral geniculate body (LGB). A cerebral angiography showed no vascular anomalies of cerebral vessels, and the left anterior choroidal artery and left lateral posterior choroidal artery could be visualized well. He had hypertension, polycythemia and dyslipidemia and was a habitual smoker and an alcoholic...
October 21, 2016: Rinshō Shinkeigaku, Clinical Neurology
Rui Zhang, Lotte Bonde Bertelsen, Christian Flø, Yan Wang, Hans Stødkilde-Jørgensen
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Due to well-developed Circle of Willis in pigs, it is technically challenging to make persistent focal ischemic stroke based on occlusion of cerebral arteries. Endothelin-1 could cause a focal lesion by forcing transient but strong vasoconstriction in the circumscribed injected area. Its use in porcine stroke model has drawn attention lately. However, all the porcine endothelin-1 induced models were euthanized soon after surgery. Whether the brain lesion is persistent, and whether they could cause neurological deficit are not known...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
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