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Pulseless electrical activity

Henrik Vase, Steffen Christensen, Aage Christiansen, Christian Juhl Therkelsen, Evald Høj Christiansen, Hans Eiskjær, Steen Hvidtfeldt Poulsen
INTRODUCTION: Mechanical circulatory support may be considered as a therapeutic option in selected patients with refractory cardiac arrest (rCA). Animal studies suggest a potential role for the Impella(®) left ventricular assist device in this setting, but so far no human data have been published. METHODS: Eight patients with rCA were treated with the Impella CP(®) device at our institution from November 2014 to October 2015. The Impella CP(®) was used at the discretion of the treating physicians in patients with rCA and pulseless electrical activity with presumed primary left ventricular failure...
October 14, 2016: Resuscitation
Sing C Tan, Benjamin Sieu-Hon Leong
BACKGROUND: Emergency Department Cardiac Arrests are typically classified with in-hospital cardiac arrests, but are yet to be well described as a distinct clinical entity. This study provides an Utstein style report on Emergency Department Cardiac Arrests, and identifies factors associated with survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who experienced a cardiac arrest in the Emergency Department of the National University Hospital, Singapore, between January 2010 and August 2012 were studied...
October 4, 2016: European Journal of Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine
Paul S Chan, Robert A Berg, Yuanyuan Tang, Lesley H Curtis, John A Spertus
Importance: Therapeutic hypothermia is used for patients following both out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest. However, randomized trials on its efficacy for the in-hospital setting do not exist, and comparative effectiveness data are limited. Objective: To evaluate the association between therapeutic hypothermia and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design, Setting, and Patients: In this cohort study, within the national Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, 26 183 patients successfully resuscitated from an in-hospital cardiac arrest between March 1, 2002, and December 31, 2014, and either treated or not treated with hypothermia at 355 US hospitals were identified...
October 4, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Romolo Gaspari, Anthony Weekes, Srikar Adhikari, Vicki E Noble, Jason T Nomura, Daniel Theodoro, Michael Woo, Paul Atkinson, David Blehar, Samuel M Brown, Terrell Caffery, Emily Douglass, Jacqueline Fraser, Christine Haines, Samuel Lam, Michael Lanspa, Margaret Lewis, Otto Liebmann, Alexander Limkakeng, Fernando Lopez, Elke Platz, Michelle Mendoza, Hal Minnigan, Christopher Moore, Joseph Novik, Louise Rang, Will Scruggs, Christopher Raio
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound has been suggested to improve outcomes from advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), but no large studies have explored how it should be incorporated into ACLS. Our aim was to determine whether cardiac activity on ultrasound during ACLS is associated with improved survival. METHODS: We conducted a non-randomized, prospective, protocol-driven observational study at 20 hospitals across United States and Canada. Patients presenting with out-of-hospital arrest or in-ED arrest with pulseless electrical activity or asystole were included...
September 28, 2016: Resuscitation
Christian Steinberg, Zachary W M Laksman, Andrew D Krahn
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still among the leading causes of death in women and men, accounting for over 50% of all fatal cardiovascular events in the United States. Two arrhythmia mechanisms of SCD can be distinguished as follows: shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia) and non-shockable rhythms including asystole or pulseless electrical activity. The overall prognosis of cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms is significantly better. While the majority of SCDs is attributed to coronary artery disease or other structural heart disease, no obvious cause can be identified in 5% of all events, and those events are labeled as sudden unexplained deaths (SUD)...
November 2016: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine
Ryan J Kline, Ky Pham, Carmen L Labrie-Brown, Ken Mancuso, Paul LeLorier, James Riopelle, Alan David Kaye
BACKGROUND: Reflex hypotension and bradycardia have been reported to occur following administration of several drugs associated with administration of anesthesia and also following a variety of procedural stimuli. CASE REPORT: A 54-year-old postmenopausal female with a history of asystole associated with sedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and post-anesthetic-induction tracheal intubation received advanced cardiac resuscitation after insertion of a temporary transvenous pacemaker failed to prevent pulseless electrical activity...
2016: Ochsner Journal
Sanjeev Bhoi, Prakash Ranjan Mishra, Kapil Dev Soni, Upendra Baitha, Tej Prakash Sinha
INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of literature on prehospital care and epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) in India. This study highlights the profile and characteristics of TCA. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to study epidemiological profile of TCA patients ≥1 year presenting to a level 1 trauma center of India. RESULTS: One thousand sixty-one patients were recruited in the study. The median age (interquartile range) was 32 (23-45) years (male:female ratio of 5...
August 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Scott T Youngquist, Atman P Shah, John P Rosborough, James T Niemann
Most resuscitated victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who survive to hospital expire due to the postresuscitation syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by a sepsis-like proinflammatory state. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether a relationship exists between the rise of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proinflammatory cytokine, following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and early postarrest survival in a clinically relevant animal model of spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF)...
October 2016: Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
Cyril Stechovsky, Petr Hajek, Simon Cipro, Josef Veselka
Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed...
September 2016: International Journal of Angiology: Official Publication of the International College of Angiology, Inc
Ruiying Zheng, Shengyuan Luo, Jinli Liao, Zhihao Liu, Jia Xu, Hong Zhan, Xiaoxing Liao, Yan Xiong, Ahamed Idris
BACKGROUND: The prognostic implication of conversion from initially non-shockable to shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. Our objective is to determine whether the conversion to shockable rhythms is a reliable predictor of short- and long-term outcomes both in patients who initially presented with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and in those with asystole. METHODS: A secondary analysis was performed on non-traumatic OHCA cases ≥18 years old with PEA or asystole as initial rhythms, who were treated in the field and enrolled in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) PRIMED study (clinicaltrials...
October 2016: Resuscitation
Jonathan Lipps, Andrew Goldberg, Samuel DeMaria, Yury Khelemsky, Adam Levine, Vedat Yildiz, Bryan Mahoney
With pulseless electrical activity (PEA) emerging as one of the leading cardiac arrest arrhythmias, the rapid response and accurate diagnosis of PEA is essential to improve survival rates. Although the use of invasive blood pressure monitoring to more quickly detect changes in blood pressure is widespread, evidence for its use is largely anecdotal and placement is not without risk. This is a prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled trial involving 58 senior anesthesiology residents undergoing a simulation of intraoperative PEA using high-fidelity simulation...
August 13, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
David Hamon, Vincent Algalarrondo, Estelle Gandjbakhch, Fabrice Extramiana, Eloi Marijon, Nathalie Elbaz, Dounia Selhane, Jean-Luc Dubois-Rande, Emmanuel Teiger, Violaine Plante-Bordeneuve, Thibaud Damy, Nicolas Lellouche
BACKGROUND: Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is associated with a poor prognosis with the proposed mechanism of sudden cardiac death in the majority of patients being pulseless electrical activity. However, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) indications in CA patients are unclear. We performed a detailed evaluation of our CA population undergoing ICD implantation and assessed appropriate ICD therapy and survival predictors. METHODS: We included consecutive patients from June 2008 to November 2014 in five centers...
November 1, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Philippe Haouzi, Nicole Tubbs, Matthew D Rannals, Annick Judenherc-Haouzi, Larry A Cabell, Joe A McDonough, Takashi Sonobe
Our objective was to determine how circulatory failure develops following systemic administration of potassium cyanide (KCN). We used a non-inhaled modality of intoxication, wherein the change in breathing pattern would not influence the diffusion of CN into the blood, akin to the effects of ingesting toxic levels of CN. In a group of 300-400 g rats, CN-induced coma (CN IP, 7 mg/kg) produced a central apnea within 2-3 minutes along with a potent and prolonged gasping pattern leading to auto-resuscitation in 38% of the animals...
August 10, 2016: Shock
Christine M Murphy, Cliff Williams, Michael E Quinn, Brian Nicholson, Thomas Shoe, Michael C Beuhler, William P Kerns
Animal studies and human case reports show promise in using lipid rescue to treat refractory calcium channel antagonist toxicity. However, the majority of research and clinical experience has focused on non-dihydropyridine agents. Thus, we sought to investigate the value of lipid emulsion (ILE) therapy for dihydropyridine-induced shock. This IACUC-approved study utilized seven swine that were sedated with alpha-chloralose, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented for drug delivery and hemodynamic measures...
August 8, 2016: Journal of Medical Toxicology: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology
Masaomi Gohbara, Tsutomu Endo, Kazuo Kimura
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 1, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Helaleh Rabiei, Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran
Kimberly A Fox, Todd M Phillips, Joseph H Yanta, Michael G Abesamis
CONTEXT: Post-arthroplasty metallosis, which refers to metallic corrosion and deposition of metallic debris in the periprosthetic soft tissues of the body, is an uncommon complication. Systemic cobalt toxicity post-arthroplasty is extremely rare. The few known fatal cases of cobalt toxicity appear to be a result of replacing shattered ceramic heads with metal-on-metal or metal-on-polyethylene implants. Friction between residual shards of ceramic and cobalt-chromium implants allows release of cobalt into the synovial fluid and bloodstream, resulting in elevated whole blood cobalt levels and potential toxicity...
November 2016: Clinical Toxicology
Mina Attin, Rebecca G Tucker, Mary G Carey
Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy...
September 2016: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
Amit C Nathwani, James F Down, John Goldstone, James Yassin, Paul I Dargan, Andres Virchis, Nick Gent, David Lloyd, John D Harrison
BACKGROUND: Polonium-210 ((210)Po) gained widespread notoriety after the poisoning and subsequent death of Mr Alexander Litvinenko in London, UK, in 2006. Exposure to (210)Po resulted initially in a clinical course that was indistinguishable from infection or exposure to chemical toxins, such as thallium. METHODS: A 43-year-old man presented to his local hospital with acute abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and vomiting, and was admitted to the hospital because of dehydration and persistent gastrointestinal symptoms...
September 10, 2016: Lancet
Dane Scantling, Brian Frank, Mathew E Pontell, Sandra Medinilla
Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest...
September 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
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